Books of Literature by Nobel Prize Winning Authors: 2020 Challenge discussion

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message 1: by Tracey (last edited Mar 13, 2017 08:08AM) (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments 1900-1909: Kim by Rudyard Kipling (1901) (English author) READ
1910-1919: Dubliners by James Joyce (1914) (Irish author) READ
1920-1929: The Beautiful and Damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1922) (American author) Read
1930-1939: Out of Africa by Isak Dinesen (1937) (Danish author) READ
1940-1949: For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway (1940) (American Author) READ
1950-1959: Imperial Woman by Pearl S. Buck (1956) (American author) READ
1960-1969: Picnic at Hanging Rock by Joan Lindsay (1967) (Australian author) READ
1970-1979: Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy by John le Carré (English author) READ
1980-1989: Echoland by Per Petterson (1986) Norwegian author READ
1990-1999: Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende (1998) (Chilean author) READ


message 2: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 263 comments The Master and Margarita is a wild and wonderful book- a unique novel.


message 3: by Deborah (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) I loved A Handmaiden's Tale.


message 4: by Haaze (new)

Haaze A wonderful and colorful list! It is fortunate that Kim is from 1901! :) Was that a coincidence (I think not)? LOL I am quite intrigued by your choices! They look like great reads!!


message 5: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments Haaze wrote: "A wonderful and colorful list! It is fortunate that Kim is from 1901! :) Was that a coincidence (I think not)? LOL I am quite intrigued by your choices! They look like great reads!!"

No Kim was a book that I have wanted to read for awhile and I thought was a great book to start this group off with. Kim straddles both the century that had passed and was looking towards the new century that had begun. The old British Empire and the new changes in Europe that were just about to break on the World.


message 6: by Haaze (new)

Haaze True! Kipling definitely straddles the centuries. Have you read him before? I come across his name quite often, but have never really dwelled upon his works apart from a read aloud "Jungle Book" with my kids.


message 7: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments Haaze wrote: "True! Kipling definitely straddles the centuries. Have you read him before? I come across his name quite often, but have never really dwelled upon his works apart from a read aloud "Jungle Book" wi..."

I have read some of his poetry, children's books and The man who would be king. When I lived in England I visited his house, Bateman's, which is owned by The National Trust. I thought he was a fascinating man and my reading of Kim was long overdue.


message 8: by Haaze (new)

Haaze I now remember watching the film based on The Man Who Would Be King (starring Sean Connery among others). Like you I have certainly neglected Kim for way too long. Is the Bateman house now a museum displaying Kipling's life?


message 9: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments Haaze wrote: "I now remember watching the film based on The Man Who Would Be King (starring Sean Connery among others). Like you I have certainly neglected Kim for way too long. Is th..."
I saw that movie too. I don't think they make movies as good these days. And yes, Bateman's is held in Trust and can be viewed by the public. Kipling's study is set up as if he had just left the room.


message 10: by Haaze (new)

Haaze Tracey wrote: "Kipling's study is set up as if he had just left the room. .."

Kind of eerie.....


message 11: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 263 comments I finished reading Kim and really enjoyed it. I would not have read it if you hadn't chosen it, Tracey. Thanks.


message 12: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments Haaze wrote: "Tracey wrote: "Kipling's study is set up as if he had just left the room. .."

Kind of eerie....."


In some ways maybe but the scene was one of comfort also, for those bookish people like us


message 13: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 263 comments I use Pinterest when my eyes get tired from reading, and one of favourite topics is books. There are quite a few photos of Kipling there, at all ages.


message 14: by Haaze (new)

Haaze I always like to learn more about the authors I read (including paintings and photographs if they exist).


message 15: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments Haaze wrote: "I always like to learn more about the authors I read (including paintings and photographs if they exist)."

Me too! I wonder, is this common amongst bookish people?


message 16: by Haaze (new)

Haaze Is your pile of literary biographies growing in magnitude as well?


message 17: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments I go through phases of reading biographies. If a book resonates with me, and I feel a connection between myself and the author, then I tend to want to read about the author. I am fascinated by the Bronte family and many other Victorians, including children's authors ( Hans Christian Andersen, Lewis Carroll) and those who inspire other authors.


message 18: by Haaze (new)

Haaze I tend to gravitate towards the authors' time and culture rather than the author. Of course, this is typically the realm of a biography (but not always - can be a bit psychological at times). Sometimes a simple history book suffices. :) I have had my eyes on Joseph Frank's multivolume Dostoyevsky biography for a couple of years now... One of these years! :)


message 19: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments That would definitely be interesting. I suppose I like to understand the mind behind the book and the way that a person's culture and upbringing effects their personality and psychology.
Haaze wrote: "I tend to gravitate towards the authors' time and culture rather than the author. Of course, this is typically the realm of a biography (but not always - can be a bit psychological at times). Somet..."


message 20: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 263 comments When I was studying literature in university, we also learned about the society and the history of the time. I find that I really enjoy reading more non-fiction than when I was younger, but literature still takes first place.


message 21: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments For my list(s) I am trying to have no more than 5 English authors, the rest from other countries. The whole idea of the challenge is to broaden a person's reading base and try books that otherwise would sit on the shelf untouched. I tend to read mainly English authors so I am hoping this will work for me. How are you (group member) forcing yourself a little out of your reading comfort zone?


message 22: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 263 comments Tracey, I am also trying to broaden my reading spectrum. That is why I am glad you are limiting it to one book per author per year.


message 23: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments Rosemarie wrote: "Tracey, I am also trying to broaden my reading spectrum. That is why I am glad you are limiting it to one book per author per year."

I believe we all have a tendency to stick with what we have tried and liked. I am getting so much out of seeing other people's choices.


message 24: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments I have one more book to read and will have fulfilled the challenge.


message 25: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 263 comments That's great. I have two books to go. I finished one this evening.


message 26: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments I have finished this first year challenge and will restart the challenge again in July.


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