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Conversations: books & readers > How illustration helps children ?

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message 1: by Joann (new)

Joann Kinlaw (joannkinlaw) | 2 comments Illustrated books are a great source to teach children about the particular subject. As pictures leave a positive n deep impact on the brain of the child. Its increase their recall memory. It’s a human psychology that we love visuality. When we see picture or portrait , we are trying to figure out it n try to learn what the portrait want to convey us.
Illustration speaks itself n children love to watch them.Children love listening to stories and by illustrated storybooks they can match what they hear to what they watch about the story and understand the real contexts of the story. Illustration helps in developing children visual literacy and appreciation of art. Joann Kinlaw


message 2: by Rosemary (new)

Rosemary Lister | 4 comments I agree so much with your comments on the value of illustration. They added so much to my childhood reading and many of my memories of books are tied up with the pictures. However I have also a slight reservation. My two children (now adult) had contrasting approaches to learning to read. My daughter, very verbal, interested in words and listening intently when being told/read stories learned to read very easily. My son however was interested in the visual. He would pore over illustrations, extracting enormous amounts of detail from them, but often disregarded the text as much less informative. He loved Asterix and Tintin books and could tell me what was happening in the stories without reading the text. I remember reading a quote from someone famous (can't remember who) that he only bothered to learn to read when he was given a book which had no pictures. This is very much how it worked with my son. We struggled to get him to read books, although he loved listening to them being read to him and was capable of reading them himself. It was only when I picked out books for older children with few illustrations to read to him that he began to read ahead on his own. I think "Swallows and Amazons" was the breakthrough book. Since then he became an avid, almost obsessive reader and still is today.


message 3: by Becky (new)

Becky Villareal (villarealbecky) For Second Language Learners, illustrations in books are imperative! This is the way they learn the new language by seeing the picture and hearing the new vocabulary word at the same time. This isn't necessarily limited to children, but students of all ages who are striving to learn a second language.


message 4: by Robin (new)

Robin | 2 comments I know for us the illustrations help out with my daughter. She identifies the words with the pictures and it helps her. Also, often I get picture books and she will make up her own stories to the pictures that she sees. Some of the stories she creates to the pictures are incredible, her imagination runs wild.


message 5: by Manybooks (last edited Sep 02, 2016 01:18AM) (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
Becky wrote: "For Second Language Learners, illustrations in books are imperative! This is the way they learn the new language by seeing the picture and hearing the new vocabulary word at the same time. This isn..."

For many if not most ESL or any second language learners, illustrations are, indeed, essential, but there are also those who tend to find especially wordless illustrations somewhat distracting. While I do make ample use of illustrations when teaching first year basic German, I also do not overuse the former (and always have accompanying text) as I know from personal experience (being someone very textual who is easily confused with and by diagrams and illustrations sans narrative) how problematic especially completely textless examples and the like can be for some.


message 6: by Penny (new)

Penny Cline (pennycline) | 79 comments Rosemary wrote: "I agree so much with your comments on the value of illustration. They added so much to my childhood reading and many of my memories of books are tied up with the pictures. However I have also a sli..."

That's very interesting, Rosemary. I have three-year-old twin grandchildren, a boy and a girl, and your description of your son and daughter's early approach to books and reading could be about them. The little boy loves books with incredible detail - Where's Wally? is a special favorite, but Asterix and Tintin are popular too. He will sit for ages poring over the pictures. The tip about books with fewer pictures may well come in handy later.

As for illustrations, I believe the visual image has greater power to imprint itself on the memory more quickly than read or spoken words. For me, it feels like a more direct route to the brain, not only for learning but for stimulating and engaging the emotions too. Although I guess it may depend on the way each individual brain is wired up.

Having said all of the above though, I did somehow learn The Rime of the Ancient Mariner just by reading it for pleasure (and sadness) when I was about 12, even though there were no illustrations in the book.


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