World, Writing, Wealth discussion

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message 1: by Mehreen (last edited Jul 25, 2016 03:17AM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1907 comments As an author what can be or should be deemed as success? Money, fame, or the love of writing? Is our impulsive book marketing going to consume us in the end?


message 2: by Tim (new)

Tim Rees | 732 comments Success is subjective. Each of us write for our own reasons and aspire to our own goals. If I was to define my own success it would that I had the courage to embark on the journey.

When I took my first step the goal was to be a published author - published meant traditionally. At that time the only indie authors belonged to what we referred to as the vanity press. I am now a published author so I suppose I succeeded in my initial goal. But during the journey I stretched myself creatively and learned to write properly and so my aspirations are now very different and I'm still reaching for success. I hope that I continue to reach and continue to stretch myself creatively and I hope my goal is always out of reach so I am continually inspired to write the next novel or script...


message 3: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1907 comments Tim wrote: "Success is subjective. Each of us write for our own reasons and aspire to our own goals. If I was to define my own success it would that I had the courage to embark on the journey.

When I took my..."


Quite right Tim. I'm a traditionally published author too and my goal was to write books which I have and will continue. Fame, money and power do not appeal to me that much. Although I do realise that we must all sell books but not to the detriment of my love for writing. Money and power as emanated by publishers and the ever changing publishing world can destroy that soft desire of writing for love. It is a hard call, I know.


message 4: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 15717 comments Mehreen wrote: "As an author what can be or should be deemed as success? Money, fame, or the love of writing? Is our impulsive book marketing is consuming us in the end?"

I guess we want all of these: money, fame and love of writing. In my opinion, the success is dual. The artistic success is to conceive a story, express yourself, see the book aired and have some sort of acceptance from the readers, while the material part - is sales and incomes.
I haven't done marketing that much up until recently, so I don't feel consumed yet, but I do think that if you put reasonable efforts and nothing or very little happens over some period of time, there should be a point to abandon further marketing lest we waste too much time (and money) and grow acrimonious..


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments I want to always love the process of putting my thoughts on paper. Writing is very much essential to who I am. I will always be a writer whether or not i continue to be an author. But as an author I would define my version of success as connecting with readers and knowing that they love what i have produced. There is no feeling like that!


message 6: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) Tara wrote: "BRILLIANT SHIZZ"

+1


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments ikr?


message 8: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasonvigorito) | 5 comments Wow, great topic and phenomenal responses!

My idea of success with my writing is that it gets completed and published. (I have yet to complete my first, by the way.) For me, my passion withstands all other factors. As clichéd as it is, my happiness is in the journey of completion for me.

The first top bonus for me would be that my books are not just read but also talked about. Obviously, I wish everyone would enjoy them, but even those who vehemently dislike it are appreciated. I'm someone who believes that if you spark a debate then you have made a significant contribution to the world.

Second bonus for me would be connecting with others through my writings. A connection spurred by what comes out of my own mind is equivalent to finding kindred spirits. And kindred spirits enrich each others' lives.

Then it's the money and fame and all that other stuff.


message 9: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 15717 comments Jason wrote: "I'm someone who believes that if you spark a debate then you have made a significant contribution to the world. ..."

Hi Jason and welcome,

Completing is indeed the first milestone and for many this is the most enjoyable part.
And afterwards - sparking a debate is huge. Some say there is no such thing as negative PR, for any reaction is probably better than indifference.
Hope you'll find kindred spirits, enjoy and contribute!


message 10: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasonvigorito) | 5 comments Thank you for pointing me to this group, Nik! I seem to have found a slew of them here :-).


message 11: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) Well, since Mr Jason (Hi and welcome!!) resurrected this little zombie, I wanna play too...

Success for me is 1)challenging the status quo and 2)being remembered.

What I love is being in an underestimated (underrepresented?) niche. It's just so darn satisfying to do something that hasn't been done before, ya know? Tell me I can't do something. Then lemme go prove you wrong. That's my hot button. Gives me goosebumps just thinking about it.

Oh, and my absolute favorite thing is having readers say, "This is my first time ever reading a book with..."

More goosebumps.

Anyhoo, welcome again, Mr Jason!

Hugs,
Ann


message 12: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasonvigorito) | 5 comments Thank you for the warm welcome, Annie! With your great comment, I definitely know I'm among kindred spirits :-D!


message 13: by Tim (new)

Tim Rees | 732 comments Jason wrote: Obviously, I wish everyone would enjoy them, but even those who vehemently dislike it are appreciated. I'm someone who believes that if you spark a debate then you have made a significant contribution to the world.

Absolutely spot on, Jason. You hit the nail on the head there. I'm also a writer who seeks to stir debate and if I achieve that goal then that would certainly be a measure of success.


message 14: by Tim (last edited Aug 26, 2016 03:58PM) (new)

Tim Rees | 732 comments A message particularly for Jason: keep your belief, my friend, because it does pay off. After replying to you I received this review and it is a review that justified writing the novel, because if only one person gets it, you've successfully communicated the point you wanted to make... #sigh ... This is a hard business with small but significant rewards... :D

The review from Laela Ae:

I used to really love British thrillers, and so it was fun to return to a genre I hadn't read in a while. "Delphian" hits many hallmarks of the genre, but is also a thriller with a bit of a difference, which made it even more interesting for me.

The main character, Vincent, is an ex-Intelligence agent who goes MIA, presumed dead, and takes up his own personal mission to expose horrific medical testing being funded by the British government. This lands him in the middle of a very sensitive subject: medical research can lead to life-saving breakthroughs, but is based on horrible exploitation and torture. If your life, or your child's life, could be saved by performing experiments on foreign prostitutes, should the experiments be carried out? What about on beagles or rats? Is it okay to torture and kill unwilling and completely innocent victims in order to (maybe) save other lives?

As you can see, this is a book with an agenda, one that I happen to agree with (namely, vivisection is unconscionable and should be replaced with other methods). If the very idea of stopping or changing medical research out of concern for its test subjects is repellent to you, than you're probably not going to like this book. However, if you're interested in a thriller that isn't afraid to delve into some sticky issues with no easy answers (is it okay for a rogue agent to kill killers in order to stop the killing??), this book has a lot to offer. And don't let the "serious" side of the book deter you if you're looking for a fast-paced thriller: this book has lots of tension and some high-action sequences that quite frankly had me on the edge of my seat, metaphorically speaking (I was actually lying down when I read them, but you get what I mean). It uses a sort of stream-of-consciousness narrative technique that sometimes leaves the narration a bit rough around the edges but is an effective tool for putting you in the characters' heads and pulling you into the action as they second-guess themselves and react to the changing circumstances. Overall, an exciting read and a worthy addition to the thriller genre.


message 15: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1907 comments Jason wrote: "Thank you for the warm welcome, Annie! With your great comment, I definitely know I'm among kindred spirits :-D!"

Welcome to the group Jason.


message 16: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) @Miss Mehreen: Do you think it's too soon to break out the group chant?

One of us. One of us. One of us.

Okay. Too soon. Oops.


message 17: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1907 comments Annie wrote: "@Miss Mehreen: Do you think it's too soon to break out the group chant?

One of us. One of us. One of us.

Okay. Too soon. Oops."


Hahaha. *She chants*


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