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The Girls
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message 1: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy (asawatzky) | 1739 comments The Girls by Emma Cline

About the Book: (source: amazon.com)
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • An indelible portrait of girls, the women they become, and that moment in life when everything can go horribly wrong—this stunning first novel is perfect for readers of Jeffrey Eugenides’s The Virgin Suicides and Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad.

Northern California, during the violent end of the 1960s. At the start of summer, a lonely and thoughtful teenager, Evie Boyd, sees a group of girls in the park, and is immediately caught by their freedom, their careless dress, their dangerous aura of abandon. Soon, Evie is in thrall to Suzanne, a mesmerizing older girl, and is drawn into the circle of a soon-to-be infamous cult and the man who is its charismatic leader. Hidden in the hills, their sprawling ranch is eerie and run down, but to Evie, it is exotic, thrilling, charged—a place where she feels desperate to be accepted. As she spends more time away from her mother and the rhythms of her daily life, and as her obsession with Suzanne intensifies, Evie does not realize she is coming closer and closer to unthinkable violence.

Emma Cline’s remarkable debut novel is gorgeously written and spellbinding, with razor-sharp precision and startling psychological insight. The Girls is a brilliant work of fiction.

About the Author: (source: http://emmacline.com/about )
Emma Cline is from California. Her fiction has appeared in Tin House and The Paris Review, and she was the recipient of the 2014 Paris Review Plimpton Prize.

Facebook page (no Twitter avail): www.facebook.com/emmaclinewriter

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If you would like to chat about this book, or this author, here's a place to do so!

Happy reading!!


message 2: by Jan (new) - rated it 3 stars

Jan (janrowell) | 1104 comments Just came across this...an interesting interview with Emma Cline. She mentions having four sisters who were close in age (along with several brothers), so she experienced their adolescence in addition to her own. http://www.barnesandnoble.com/review/...


AmberBug com* | 444 comments Thanks for the interview! I love seeing stuff like this.


message 4: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy (asawatzky) | 1739 comments Here's an interesting commentary on both The Girls & The American Girls from the Atlantic: http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainm...


Darryl (audibleclicks) | 12 comments Just finished this one. I liked it but I felt there was a lot of navel gazing in the first third of the book. Also, Evie's fascination/obsession with Suzanne is never explored to the point that I fully understood how Evie feels about her (i hope that makes sense). I enjoyed Cline's descriptive style. The detail involved in describing the major event at the mansion was disturbing and almost unreadable. And that's what made it work. I'd recommend this one.


Caroline   | 150 comments Based on Evie's teenage feelings about Suzanne, I was expecting the book to engage more specifically with queerness -- or, that is, there seemed to be a lot of queerness reflected in Evie's teenage POV, and it seemed pretty on point for a young girl who was figuring stuff out, but there was an opportunity for some more distance and reflection in the adult Evie's sections and she still didn't seem to have figured anything out about herself. It was still all about how women relate to men -- which was very well done but felt like it was missing a piece.


Mainon (bravenewbooks) | 91 comments Caroline wrote: "Based on Evie's teenage feelings about Suzanne, I was expecting the book to engage more specifically with queerness -- or, that is, there seemed to be a lot of queerness reflected in Evie's teenage..."

I'm not sure if this is the same point you're making, Caroline, but I never connected with adult Evie. It wasn't clear to me what she wanted or who she was, or why she was even in the novel, really. Young Evie was much more compelling and "real" to me.


Tiffany | 45 comments Mainon wrote: "Caroline wrote: "Based on Evie's teenage feelings about Suzanne, I was expecting the book to engage more specifically with queerness -- or, that is, there seemed to be a lot of queerness reflected ..."

Yes! I felt adult Evie was very underdeveloped. Either develop her more so that we see a long term impact, or cut the device all together, and let us as readers imagine how the events of that summer would impact a person in the future.


Jason Perdue | 632 comments For anyone else that got interested in the Manson story after reading The Girls, here's a new wrinkle:

http://www.thewrap.com/beach-boys-den...


message 10: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy (asawatzky) | 1739 comments Tiffany wrote: "Either develop her more so that we see a long term impact, or cut the device all together, r..."

I think Evie was meant to be underdeveloped as an adult, as if her maturity stopped at the time of the murders and subsequent send-off to school. But I agree, if her character doesn't give us anything, don't use the device! I kind of felt that the primary reason for adult Evie was an excuse to show us the young girlfriend of her homeowner's son. As if she was both a mirror of Evie's younger self and a symbol of 'nothing changes' (a theme I've seen in other places about how the sexual revolution didn't really liberate females). If so, the message is not fully formed.


message 11: by Jan (new) - rated it 3 stars

Jan (janrowell) | 1104 comments Interesting article by Morgan Jerkins looking at The Girls as a book specifically about the experience of privileged, white suburban females.

http://hazlitt.net/feature/reading-bo...


message 12: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy (asawatzky) | 1739 comments Jan wrote: "Interesting article by Morgan Jerkins looking at The Girls as a book specifically about the experience of privileged, white suburban females.

http://hazlitt.net/feature/reading-bo..."


thanks Jan! that was an interesting analysis


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