Georgette Heyer Fans discussion

65 views
These Old Shades - Author Area > If your novel doesn't fit the criteria for promoting here...

Comments Showing 1-19 of 19 (19 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ , Madam Mod (last edited Jul 18, 2016 02:37PM) (new)

Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4435 comments Mod
There are other groups where your novel will be welcome. Make sure you read the group's rules before jumping in.

Detective

https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

I'll let our other members post further suggestions. :)


message 3: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 1419 comments Austenesque fiction: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/... (please note that a new thread is started for the Austenesque Lovers promotion place each month; this link is to July 2016).


message 4: by Jacquie (new)

Jacquie Scuitto | 261 comments I don't write fiction but do have an ongoing story in the Regency genre that I tell myself before going to sleep. The current one has me stuck at a scene between the heroine and her fiance. I'm not sure whether it turns into a hot love scene or the heroine calls the whole thing off or whether the hero prevails and talks her into having an immediate secret wedding three months before the planned one. Real authors must have to make decisions like this all the time!


message 5: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 1419 comments You must let us know how it turns out, Jacquie! Or do you have different endings depending on your mood of the day?

I can appreciate your dilemma. I tried to write a pastoral romance in the style of As You Like It when I was fourteen, and I fetched up on the rocks at the proposal scene. I’d come to like my heroine and thought the hero was a twit, so I couldn’t make her say yes! Of course, the genre depends on the heroine saying yes, so this was a major fly in the ointment.


message 6: by Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ , Madam Mod (new)

Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4435 comments Mod
I wrote a regency when I was about 12. So long ago I can't remember much about it. :)


message 7: by Louise Sparrow (last edited Jul 19, 2016 05:28AM) (new)

Louise Sparrow (louisex) | 458 comments I write other stuff, (roleplay and fanfic, not books) I should really try a regency romance sometime!


message 8: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1390 comments Jacquie wrote: "I don't write fiction but do have an ongoing story in the Regency genre that I tell myself before going to sleep. The current one has me stuck at a scene between the heroine and her fiance. I'm not..."

OMG I am so thrilled to hear someone else does this too! I change up my story depending on my mood. You can try out the different scenarios in your head on different nights. Some nights my heroine does say no.


message 9: by Jacquie (new)

Jacquie Scuitto | 261 comments Glad to know I'm not alone in this! I did another that went for several generations and finally became unwieldy -- too many characters! The original hero was killed in a curricle race leaving his younger brother who was married to the granddaughter of a Welsh shepherd to inherit the title. Another character was the son of an Indian rajah by an English governess, sent to England for schooling and to keep him safe from his much older half-brothers, who is befriended by another brother of the original hero. I also had an orphan adopted from a workhouse by the widow of the original hero. As I said, it became a bit unwieldy!
My current hero has gone to clean up from his journey while the heroine changes from the gown she had been wearing while working in the still room. I hope they can manage to get down to business before the rest of the household comes home!


message 10: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Grant (elsiegrant) | 83 comments Jacquie wrote: "Glad to know I'm not alone in this! I did another that went for several generations and finally became unwieldy -- too many characters! The original hero was killed in a curricle race leaving his y..."

That's how I started writing! I used to tell my brother very long, very involved adventure stories after we'd gone to bed, always featuring an incredibly clever and courageous brother and sister... When we each had our own room I just told the stories to myself instead. The type of story changed as my reading changed, and yes, the scenes still change quite a lot depending on my mood, too.

Jacquie, one of the central scenes in my newly published novel takes place in the still room ;-). Where has your story gone from there, I wonder?


message 11: by sabagrey (new)

sabagrey | 71 comments Jacquie wrote: "I don't write fiction but do have an ongoing story in the Regency genre that I tell myself before going to sleep. The current one has me stuck at a scene between the heroine and her fiance. I'm not..."

I stumbled over this thread just now ... and I'm so glad to find out that I'm not the only one telling book-length stories to myself! Honestly, I thought I was going crazy.

And the craziest thing about it is that these stories come to me in English - and me not even a native speaker.

It feels as if these stories and characters were swirling around out there - in a narrative universe, or in L-space? (a very Terry-Pratchett-ish thought) - and some of them hit me on the head. And it is true that these characters want to have it their own way, whatever I had planned for them.


message 12: by Susan in NC (last edited Mar 19, 2022 06:51AM) (new)

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3610 comments I love your comment, especially the bit about coming to you in English, not even your native tongue! Which of course fires up my imagination for the absurd - what if the stories were coming to you in a language you weren’t even familiar with? Can you see the characters, as well? Would there actions, accompanied by incomprehensible language, help you interpret what they are trying to convey? Would their clothing, demeanor, living conditions help to convey their character? Do you think by observing them living out their story in your head space, you could eventually write a version of their story? Obviously have to be third person POV…hmmm…possibilities are fascinating!🤔

Fascinating thread, ladies, thank you, and a lovely, imaginative, clever way to fall asleep!


message 13: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 1419 comments Ha, Sabagrey, if you’re crazy then a lot of us are! I’ve had a particular narrative in my head since December 2000. It morphs over the years but the basic premise is the same. BTW, I would never have guessed that English is not your first language—very impressive!


message 14: by sabagrey (new)

sabagrey | 71 comments Susan in NC wrote: "I love your comment, especially the bit about coming to you in English, not even your native tongue! Which of course fires up my imagination for the absurd - what if the stories were coming to you ..."

ha, a fascinating thought ... it leads me directly on to the philosophical - Wittgenstein and so on - question if you could invent a private language that you don't understand yourself.

VERY dangerous ;-) ground to tread, as we know that it was a fascination with languages that made J.R.R. Tolkien write his LotR, and all the rest. High-Elvish (inspired by Old Finnish, it seems) came first, and thousands of pages followed ...


message 15: by Susan in NC (new)

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3610 comments sabagrey wrote: "Susan in NC wrote: "I love your comment, especially the bit about coming to you in English, not even your native tongue! Which of course fires up my imagination for the absurd - what if the stories..."

You never know where it might lead you, but what an adventure!


message 16: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Grant (elsiegrant) | 83 comments sabagrey wrote: "And the craziest thing about it is that these stories come to me in English - and me not even a native speaker."

That makes sense to me, Sabagrey. During my itinerant childhood I had to learn several languages, and I often found that I'm more relaxed, less reserved, in a foreign language. This could be conducive to storytelling, too, don't you think?
What is more, after a certain period in a new country, I'd start dreaming in foreign! This happened again when my husband and I spent a few months in Japan some years ago. It's always the same dream: I'm standing at a crossroads, and people are energetically arguing with me, presumably about which way to go, but they're speaking whichever language it is I'm trying to learn, and I can't quite follow....


message 17: by sabagrey (new)

sabagrey | 71 comments Elizabeth wrote: "That makes sense to me, Sabagrey. During my itinerant childhood I ... I often found that I'm more relaxed, less reserved, in a foreign language. "

Yes, you've nailed it.

I'm reflecting the reasons for being "less reserved" in a foreign language. My mother tongue is German, and I suppose that, when formulating in it, too many connotations and meanings and associations come to mind, and too many literary and other references for every single word. Words feel "heavier". - It must be like this in any mother tongue (Shakespeare & co. must weigh as heavily on you as Goethe & co. on me)

When I wrote in English (in my professional life as a scientist), I sometimes missed the precision and the nuances that my mother tongue would have afforded me. But for telling stories to myself, it is just fine.

I studied languages and spent months and years in the U.S., France, Belgium, and Italy - and yes, I started dreaming in the language of the country. It set in as soon as I stopped to translate inwardly. It's neurologically plausible, of course, because the brain "digests" the day's work in sleep, and releases tension - in my dreams, I was always much more fluent than in daily life.


message 18: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1390 comments I'm glad to know I'm not the only one who tells themselves stories as they go to sleep!


message 19: by Jackie (new)

Jackie | 1352 comments Elizabeth wrote:

During my itinerant childhood I had to learn several languages, and I often found that I'm more relaxed, less reserved, in a foreign language. This could be conducive to storytelling, too, don't you think?

that is such an interesting idea!

Sabagrey, I'd love to hear more about whatever writing in English (or other languages) you've done.


back to top