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Announcements > Emma Watson & Caitlin Moran in Conversation - Videos

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message 1: by Jo, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Jo (jo_9) | 373 comments Mod
Dear Our Shared Shelf,

Here are all the clips from Emma’s recent interview with Caitlin Moran, exclusively for our club!
https://www.goodreads.com/group/17958...

Please let us know what you think in the thread below...

Thank you,
Jo


message 2: by Savannah, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Savannah (dssharris) | 321 comments Mod
I think the filming and editing is lovely! The content was also great to see.


message 3: by Shana (new)

Shana Kaplan (sek1128) | 93 comments The conversations were excellent and very intriguing. Both Ms Moran and Emma are amazing women. Emma did a great job moderating the conversations. I send thanks to Ms Moran for answering questions from Our Shared Shelf and to Emma and her team for arranging the interview and sharing the videos. I enjoy them very much.


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

Sure, you are big feminists and talk about big stuff, but where are you? In the kitchen.

Nothing further, your honor!


message 5: by Jo, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Jo (jo_9) | 373 comments Mod
Where do you want them to be Adam? Standing on the wings of a jet plane? Camping out at the top of Mount Kilimanjaro?

There is nowhere more welcoming than the central hub of a person's house (the kitchen/diner). You can associate woman with kitchens all you like, but if you ask me that says more about the type of person that YOU are.

Good day to you.


message 6: by [deleted user] (last edited Jul 16, 2016 11:26AM) (new)

The fact that you get offended from such an idiotic argument shows how little self-confidence you have. If you believed in yourselves you would ignore it or you would laugh at it. Misogynist men are not the problem. Weak women that victimize themselves are the problem. Who forces women in our society to procreate like rabbits? Who forces women to sell their bodies? Who forces women to be slaves of their husbands? No one. They do it because of their stupidity. And there will always be idiots out there. The best you can do is protect your own lives. Stop trying to fix everything and help everyone and instead respect yourselves and then you won't need to worry about all the men that try to dominate you. As long as you make a competition to see who is the biggest Messiah you will always be stuck in the system. Because idiots will always sit down and wait for someone else to fix their problems. This society raises idiots systematically. Leave them alone and then they'll move. Or maybe not, but at least you will empower yourselves.

Take care of your own lives and let fall everyone else. If everybody did that, problem solved. And if they don't do it, at least you'll make your lives worth living. It's not your fault that you live surrounded by morons.


message 7: by Jo, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Jo (jo_9) | 373 comments Mod
Adam, i know how much you love ranting, but for goodness sake stay on topic for once.

This topic is to discuss the video clips, so let's do that. Any more off topicness will be deleted.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Jo wrote: "Adam, i know how much you love ranting, but for goodness sake stay on topic for once.

This topic is to discuss the video clips, so let's do that. Any more off topicness will be deleted."


Well in fact you went off topic, what I said first was clearly on topic, insulting, but on topic.


message 9: by James (new)

James Corprew My favorite interview so far.


message 10: by Christine (new)

Christine Periña | 67 comments Excellent interview! Full of sense!


message 11: by Helen (new)

Helen (helen2u) | 306 comments James wrote: "My favorite interview so far."
yep, but it has a big FLAW, they're too short, Emma I want a one hour kinda video! xx


message 12: by Helen (new)

Helen (helen2u) | 306 comments Savannah wrote: "I think the filming and editing is lovely! The content was also great to see."

talking about the editing I woulda wanted them in one video because they're so short, and they're amazing together.


message 13: by Ashwin (new)

Ashwin (ashiot) | 215 comments I just finished reading 1984. I can relate to what Emma is saying. I like the concept of culture being the catalyst of change.

Thanks Jo for the clips!


message 14: by Martin (new)

Martin Felando Watch the Emma Watson and Caitlin Moran video clips. Below find notes I jotted down to improve my understanding of what they talked about, and I hope you find them helpful.

Clip 1: Feminism is like a coat or force field that protects you against the coldness of sexism and patriarchy. Thanks to the incremental advances of courageous women there’s never been a better time to be a woman. Keep the conversation going and come up with great ideas to achieve gender equality.

Clip 2: Believe things can be solved. Share your hope, belief, and optimism about humanity’s ability to improve the world. The future is a propaganda war. We can do something positive about the future, but not if we always are creating and watching negatives about our future. “Fate depends on the tone of your voice.”

Clip 3: Heroes in our culture need to reflect our diversity. Love is love. Caitlin: “Culture is there to show you possible futures.” Storytellers should show us a better, more fun, inclusive future. Stories play an important role in our future.

Clip 4: Watch the documentary Ascent of Woman by Amanda Foreman. Equality is inside us, and was in us from the beginning of time. Sexism was unnaturally constructed. Women can flourish even more without cultural constraints.

Clip 5: What would a religion made by a woman be like? Our technical, cultural, and religious inventions should free us, inspire us, guide us, and improve gender equality.

Clip 6: We need more honorable people in government who will address long-term problems, including gender equality. Perhaps this is where new storytelling (review Clip 2) can make a difference.

Clip 7: Regarding sex workers, first do no harm. Stop the raping, beating, and killing. Regarding educating children about sex, the less porn they watch the better. We need to remove the violence from porn, and focus on consensual, loving sex.

Clip 8: Women arguing and disagreeing about this and that will happen, so let it be. Maintain calm and your sense of humor to reduce the fear and anger. Be a social conversationalist; attend meetings, do positive things together, come up with ideas that result in direct action. You don’t have to be perfect to share your ideas. Don’t wait for the perfect book that has all the answers because we’re all flawed and we all add to this patchwork quilt called feminism. It’s about collaborating to come up with the right ideas and tactics that win battles.


message 15: by Genny (new)

Genny Pisano | 21 comments First, I would like to say that I am beyond honored that Ms. Emma choose one of my questions for Ms. Caitlin!

Second, admiring both Ms. Emma and Ms. Caitlin, I really appreciated the discussion about all the questions! One can never have enough of thought-provoking talks about delicate and important matters... Enlightening!

Oh, and good job to whoever edited the video and made the clips... I so wish it was a bit longer though ^-^


message 16: by [deleted user] (last edited Jul 16, 2016 10:11PM) (new)

Religions were not made by people Caitlin. Religions were made by Nature. When it comes to the establishment of a society from "zero" the existence of individual opinions and freedom of thought is counterproductive. It's way more efficient to create a common "action protocole" for everybody. The bad point of this is that you create pseudo-individuals that sacrifice their own individuality for the sake of the community. Those pseudo-individuals lack an own conscience, or they repress it. Their conscience is God, or similar.

And as I said this works while you try to create a common base and just develop socially, but you don't advance. When it comes to advance this becomes a problem, because you need individuals to create difficult things, and they must see things themselves in all its complexity in order to be able to handle it, instead of the decaffeined reality that a common moral base offers to you.

Christianism is the most extreme example of a society based on religion, even though nowadays Islam is very similar to it, and Judaism is the origin. And the existence of such an individual as Christ made the group somehow realise unconsciously that they were disposable, and that when this process was over there was no need for it, and that's when it became extreme, as a attempt to avoid it. Nature had to protect the community in disfavor of capable individuals. That's why they killed scientists and smart women and so on. That's why they put Christ on the cross as a symbol, is makes them feel safe. They've just been trying to run away from their fate.

And I guess you know what the opposite of this system is ;).

And a religion created by women would be useless because the fact that you give birth prevents you from lacking a personal conscience. You need it. That's why they opressed you, that's why these religions opress women.

PS: I hope this is on topic!


message 17: by Martin (new)

Martin Felando Genny wrote: "First, I would like to say that I am beyond honored that Ms. Emma choose one of my questions for Ms. Caitlin!

Second, admiring both Ms. Emma and Ms. Caitlin, I really appreciated the discussion a..."


I really liked how relaxed they were. I felt like we were sitting at the table enjoying two friends sharing their truths. Caitlin makes a lot of good sense.


message 18: by Ross (new)

Ross | 1444 comments Adam wrote: "Religions were not made by people Caitlin"

Yes they are , this is the best approach to take if we are to achieve change. This is my option of course and Caitlin was stating hers. The assertion that children should have that question what would your religion look like if you created one is valid.

The questions children male and female ask will determine there view of the world and in turn the world itself. One where gender is important in terms of the identity but not in opportunity.


message 19: by Sebastian (new)

Sebastian Temlett (sebtemlett) | 8 comments On the segment on Porn -
This was interesting. I feel her views are much nuanced than I initially thought after reading her book. And I agree with her.

Depictions of people having sex are as old as humanity. Pornography was "invented" by Victorian lawmakers! There's a great documentary on the discovery of Pompey and the erotic images found preserved in the ruins.

I do think there is a big problem with the porn industry and its depiction of women (and men) and I definitely think there are risks of addiction, or habitual use by viewers.

Great interview.


message 20: by Eman (new)

Eman Zahra Adam wrote: "The fact that you get offended from such an idiotic argument shows how little self-confidence you have. If you believed in yourselves you would ignore it or you would laugh at it. Misogynist men ar..." I kinda have to agree to that. I am a female but I get disgusted sometimes that women go through plastic surgeries to have bigger breasts, a good butt and wear revealing clothes just to impress men. If women fight for their rights, they can achieve incredible things (I am not saying women should be superior) but the problem is that they don't choose to fight. They easily get under men's clutches just because they are mesmerized by their looks. If idiots aren't spoon fed, they'll just do something even more idiotic.


message 21: by Ross (new)

Ross | 1444 comments Eman Wrote: " I kinda have to agree to that"

I think equality means people women or men can if they wish alter there appearance as they chose and still be treated with respect. it is a personal matter.

Perhaps in an equal world people would do less of this maybe they would do more so what, people should be judged on what they say and do how they want to look doing that is up to them really.

Not every woman (or man) believes as most of us do here they should have that right unless it actively impinges on another well being.


message 22: by Dario (last edited Jul 18, 2016 03:04PM) (new)

Dario | 7 comments I find this interview enlightening, especially the second clip. It's about time we stop complaining about what's wrong in this world (sadly a lot) and start figure out how it should be, how we'd like it to be.

Optimism to me is one of the most important traits a person can have, because in order to change something you must be able to imagine it in a different way. I really think we are on a good path to equality, even if still far away.

I also enjoyed the last clip. Together we are stronger, divided we can't make such a big cultural change of something that's been radicated in our society for thousands of years.

Thanks to Emma and everyone in the staff for letting us enjoy this brilliant conversation.


message 23: by Dusti (new)

Dusti Prioux | 11 comments Clip 1 - it is a great time to be a woman. I've been seeing more things of sexism in the past, like hiding pregnancies through the 1940s, and I'm grateful for where we are today, but I can't wait to see where we can be. I hope we can come together as a society, but the media desperately tries to hide the truth. And all the recent debates in the US about Black Lives Matter, Blue Lives Matter, It should be ALL LIVES MATTER!

Clip 2 - 1984 is on my list to read! Disappointing people can't come together to realize our full potential. Emma such wonderful points about the shift of focus from utopia to dystopia. I can't wait to read Moranifesto! Be the change you want to see in the world. A woman thought today's feminist movement was a shadow of the pasts' because we choose equality! She believed that everyone should believe what she did and those are the only ones she supported! So close-minded and you're hurting yourself the most by acting this way.

Clip 3 - I would love for more people to feel more comfortable speaking up and doing more for each other.

Clip 4 - I wish I could watch the ascent of women! Oh Netflix is amazing! Netflix for women!

Clip 5 - A religion made by women...wow. A whole new perspective. I'll be following for your next books.

Clip 6 - It's so difficult to be a woman and put yourself into politics especially when you have stones being thrown at you just for being a woman and you want to stay away from the toxicity for your own sanity. Takes a strong woman to make it far and its inspiring to see Clinton where she is (despite mistakes), but who's perfect?!?!

Clip 7 - Thank you so much for addressing this issue. A lot to consider and share with others.

Clip 8- such EPIC suggestions, but how to motivate women and men in this direction. I think you hit the nail on the head with social media and it's such a shame that people can't RATIONALLY share their ideas. "Never a feminist Jesus." Just like it was said in The Color Purple, when did African Americans start wondering when the white male Jesus had cursed them based on their color and gender. We live in such a patriarchal society and I'd love for people to spread the word of #HeforShe! Thank you to the people that have fought the battles for us already and I encourage those that are holding back - we need you to fight and voice your concerns.

@EmmaWatson may you, pretty please, curate a list of all the books you're reading, want to read, or recommend? I'd love to see more of this! I was very disappointed I wouldn't be able to read the full 12 books recommended by you! I want more!


message 24: by Justice (new)

Justice Alisto | 1 comments Jo wrote: "Dear Our Shared Shelf,

Here are all the clips from Emma’s recent interview with Caitlin Moran, exclusively for our club!
https://www.goodreads.com/group/17958......"



message 25: by Ana (new)

Ana | 2 comments I liked a lot this interview❤️


message 26: by Dagny Moland (new)

Dagny Moland Seim | 48 comments Enjoyed the interview, have to read Moranifesto now :)

For a long time I have agreed with everything Emma/Caitlin said during the "culture is key" clip. When I read this article today (link below), about a woman writing about the horrors she experienced as a child bride and the book selling well Afghanistan, the idea resonated with me even stronger.

Link to the article: https://www.theguardian.com/world/201...


message 27: by Rose (new)

Rose (reradford) | 58 comments Lovely interview. Thanks to both of them for talking about the diversity question, even if the question was deliberately left unstated.


message 28: by Genny (new)

Genny Pisano | 21 comments Martin wrote:I really liked how relaxed they were. I felt like we were sitting at the table enjoying two friends sharing their truths. Caitlin makes a lot of good sense."

Yes, Martin, I have to agree. Relax, and most important, POLITENESS, are what makes a discussion good, thought-provoking and significant.

To this, I would like to add that, as another user stated before me, that is really a remarkable thing to see two great women, admired and followed, promoting some OPTIMISM.

I really appreciated that part because, as things are today (just to name few, Brexit, Trump running as US President, deterioration of relationships between many countries especially western and middle-eastern ones, Russia getting kicked out of a worldwide joyous event like the Olympics, random violent attacks like the ones in France, Germany, Afghanistan and many others...) people are becoming more and more inclined to negative thinking and we all know, that such a thing is exactly the beginning of the end.

I know I risk to sound a bit too idealist here, but really, we need optimism now more than ever; we need to be able to believe again, as only the capability of dreaming has led us so far.

Hope more and more famous people will start spreading some optimism so to give back to everybody their will to dream enabling them to achieve great things again.


message 29: by Lizbeth (new)

Lizbeth (goodreadscomlameredith) | 2 comments What an interesting and fresh take on sex workers. It reminds me somewhat of the heroin controversy with clean-needle programs in that we need to worry about safety first and foremost of those impacted.

Love the humor and the bravely shared opinion. Thanks for posting this.


message 30: by Mahir (last edited Jul 25, 2016 11:28AM) (new)

Mahir Mustari | 3 comments Adam wrote: "Well in fact you went off topic, what I said first was clearly on topic, insulting, but on topic. "

how you expect someone to be not offended then? If I saw something annoying I would reply; if that means I have 'little self-confidence,' so be it.


message 31: by Max W (new)

Max W | 1 comments It feels good to listen to such a deep and profound discussion. I really think that the "culture is the key" part is a very essential one in our contemporary society since a lot of the representation of gender roles (not just feminist!) relies on the way on how they are depicted in the received media and in social media as well.

Regards from Berlin.


message 32: by Anne Elisabeth (new)

Anne Elisabeth   (anneelisabeth) | 90 comments This was a good interview. They had a good, reasonable discussion and managed to make me more optimistic.
I feel much of the discussion taking place today is focused almost solely on the negative aspects of life, feminism and our future. This discussion made me focus more on the positive sides of life and how we can affect things. I also hope that being a politician can become a positive thing, not a negative one, as we need good politicians who will help shape our future for the better.


message 33: by Ashwin (new)

Ashwin (ashiot) | 215 comments I must say I don't agree with Caitlin on Twitter being the cause of fights. Those who have a propensity to fighting will fight; no matter the medium. And it's pretty ok to have heated arguments IMHO, as long as people don't hold a grudge.


message 34: by Ross (new)

Ross | 1444 comments Ashwin Wrote: "I don't agree.. Twitter being the cause of fights. "

I think Caitlin was referring to the anonymous nature of twitter allowing people to take arguments to extremes they would not be able to in other mediums. Trolls used to be very limited to the poison pen letter in the past, now they have the world to abuse for example.

I like twitter and social media in general, but it can be abused particularly if you are famous or make a public stand for something.


message 35: by Ana, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Ana PF | 746 comments Mod
Hey, hey! Those of you who enjoyed the videos and are concerned about the content being readily available for non-native English speakers can head to the Multilingual folder - we've got something new for you there! :)


message 36: by Robert (new)

Robert | 6 comments I've seen the videos those days, and now finished chapter one of "How to be a woman". (I'm no 'big-reader', I know ;-) )
I re-read some parts of it again, and - after watching the videos - I understood some things better. Interestingly, when I read these parts in the first time, I was skeptic and prejudiced (negatively) and sometimes, I couldn't really "follow" Caitlin Moran.
After watching the videos, I was more open-minded towards her (seeing her moves, and the way she expresses), and I think that's been the clue to understanding her better in the book.
I can identify with nearly all she wrote in chapter one of "How to be a woman" and enjoyed the videos.

Through her writing (as far as I read), Caitlin really pointed out what life "unfortunately" (?) is: sometimes bitterly sad and painful, and sometimes full of extraordinary coincidences an intelligent and humorous writer and thinker like Caitlin - solely meant positively - can really make profits out of, through mindfulness and humour.

Thanks to Caitlin and Emma, my thumbs are up :-)


message 37: by Brebis (new)

Brebis Emplumée | 5 comments Hello I watched the videos yesterday. For a none native of English language, I found that Caitlin speak very very fast. :D

But it was an enjoyement to listen to her. So I began her book yesterday night (in french :P ).

In chapter one I found myself in some of her descriptions. You don't dare ask question and you are not invited to do it. You have to suffer in silence.
I'm currently reading chapter two. In that chapter Caitlin says that we need more porn. I don't quite agree with her. My opinion is that we don't need more porn, but, like Caitlin, I think we need different porn.

Well all that to says that it is quite enjoyable to read somebody to whom you can relate about ideas.


message 38: by Ana, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Ana PF | 746 comments Mod
Brebis wrote: "Hello I watched the videos yesterday. For a none native of English language, I found that Caitlin speak very very fast. :D

But it was an enjoyement to listen to her. So I began her book yesterday ..."


Well, we have an upcoming translation of these talks into French, so in case you missed some details, don't fret! :D Oh, and also, you can always read the English transcription available here:

https://www.goodreads.com/topic/group...

;D


message 39: by Robert (new)

Robert | 6 comments I know this is not the right place for the following suggestion for improvement, please move it (if you find a better one ;-) )

When you login to Our Shared Shelf, you can see a stable pattern for the places of the conversations. However, meanwhile, OSS already has already got so many discussions that I think it might be well to create an additional section on top (!) where the most actual ones (where people just have made a comment in) appear automatically on the top.
This would prevent some "old" discussions placed somewhere "far away" from simply being overseen by the OSS-members.

I know this is a matter of software, so the realisation might not be so easy, however, I think this would be really fine.

would be glad for input, Robert


message 40: by James (new)

James Corprew Robert wrote: "I know this is not the right place for the following suggestion for improvement, please move it (if you find a better one ;-) )

When you login to Our Shared Shelf, you can see a stable pattern for..."


I generally just click on the "unread" option when i first log in and then go to the threads ive been following discussions in. Im assuming that is what you are talking about?


message 41: by Katelyn, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Katelyn (katelynrh) | 836 comments Mod
Meelie wrote: "Robert wrote: "I know this is not the right place for the following suggestion for improvement, please move it (if you find a better one ;-) )

When you login to Our Shared Shelf, you can see a sta..."


And I'll add on, that this is not something that our moderation team can create. That would be a job for the Goodreads programmers, and I don't think they can make changes like that just for one group. Perhaps if there were a need for that across groups, it might be something they'd look into. You could perhaps suggest it to them by contacting them: https://www.goodreads.com/about/conta...


message 42: by Angie (new)

Angie (lifewithalyons) | 11 comments Evan wrote: "Really inspiring and insightful interview -- I especially loved Clip 2's statement about the importance of optimism in determining humanity's future, Clip 3's emphasis on culture as a force for cha..."

I really like the quote that you picked put, I think that conceptualizing intersectional feminism as a quilt or puzzle where all the pieces are different but all equally important in creating the 'bigger picture' is so simple and powerful as a metaphor. Without the intersectional element I feel that any movement, whether its feminism or the Black Lives Matter movement cannot only not accurately represent the people that it is fighting for, but it will not gain the large numbers and support needed to affect real change in the world. I particularly appreciated that she mentioned trans women because it's important to remember that all people who identify as women ARE women and their issues are OUR(the feminist movement's) issues.

I just joined the book club, in part because of this interview and I am excited to read through past books!


message 43: by Aglaea (new)

Aglaea | 987 comments I watched all the clips as well as Caitlin's letter yesterday, and enjoyed them a great deal. What jumped out the most was the patchwork idea combined with feminist Jesus. We would never ask from a man to be all things, so why put others under such pressure?

Gloria Steinem and Caitlin Moran both have expressed themselves such that even in this group they were practically hanged by some members, but look at what Moran has accomplished so far in terms of contributing to the discussion. She also criticises partly her own heroine, Germaine Greer, yet says her work is part of the foundation and hence what we are standing on today. Good point.

Are these people supposed to be perfect first, before being allowed to speak in the name of feminism? Moran did mention in one of the clips that in the five years since her writing the book, she has kept educating herself on women in history for example. Another good point.

Look at how much we stumble in this very group, when trying to sort our thoughts on a vast array of topics, none of us are feminist Jesuses and have a very long way to go. At least we aren't leaving the dialogue, which is more than can be said for many others.


message 44: by Ross (new)

Ross | 1444 comments Aglaea Wrote: "none of us are feminist Jesuses and have a very long way to go. At least we aren't leaving the dialogue, which is more than can be said for many others. "

Very true and we shall continue on until we have the Equality the whole species needs. Now more than ever.


message 45: by Ana, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Ana PF | 746 comments Mod
Hi there, people! Just thought I'd let you know that translations into Spanish (clips 1 to 6), Dutch (clips 1 to 3) and Italian are now available for the Moran talks! Stay tuned for more and please contact me if you'd like to contribute to our Translation Service!


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