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message 1: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1014 comments The current issue of Library Journal has a notice about an event called Indie Author Day, to be observed on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016, and apparently sponsored by Library Journal and its SELF-e affiliate. As explained there, this is aimed at raising librarians' awareness of self-published e-books, which reportedly "now account for 80% of Amazon's bestseller lists" (not surprisingly, since Amazon pushes e-books to save shipping costs), but are only carried by 20% of the libraries that responded to a recent survey. The day will feature local author events at "hundreds of libraries all over North America," as well as a mid-day digital discussion by a panel of "industry leaders." More information is supposedly available at www.indieauthorday.com , but in fact that link does not work, at least just now when I tried it.

Personally, I'd like to see the event include authors of print books as well as e-books, and for it to be inclusive of small-press authors as well as those who self-publish; but I'm sure the sponsors have their own particular agenda. But in any case, I think it's valuable for librarians to be made aware of this vital and growing branch of the book trade, and to begin to consider making their collections more inclusive of these books! E-book independent authors in this group might be interested in touching base with their local libraries about this.


message 2: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1014 comments This link is actually functional: http://indieauthorday.com/ .


message 3: by E.M. (new)

E.M. Swift-Hook | 75 comments I think this is a fabulous idea!

Sadly not one I can take part in as it seems to be for North American ebook authors only, but I will spread the word to those who can benefit.


message 4: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1014 comments Thanks, E. M.! Yes, their original focus seems to have been on North American libraries; but I'm guessing that they wouldn't refuse to let a British library take part, if one wanted to. (If they set up something similar next year, I'd like to see them make it a worldwide effort --and, as I said above, broaden their focus to include print books, and small-press authors.)


message 5: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) | 102 comments Werner wrote: "This link is actually functional: http://indieauthorday.com/ ."

I have sent off my information. Thanks. The devil will be in the details, so I'll see what, if anything, comes of my registration.

Personally, I'd like vanity and subsidy publishers not included, though their authors could be if they choose. Small legitimate presses already have access to library distribution. Indies in general don't make the effort, since they are often rebuffed.

The world is changing - it is always disruptive to the old ways.


message 6: by E.M. (new)

E.M. Swift-Hook | 75 comments Werner wrote: "I'd like to see them make it a worldwide effort --and, as I said above, broaden their focus to include print books, and small-press authors."

I agree both points - though I would say as an ebook only author myself the opportunities for myself and my ilk are waaay less than for those who can afford - or who manages to earn - access to the printed market, so it is wonderful to see something directed at that group in particular.

I shared this on an fb group I am in and already have had a lot of interest, so thanks on behalf of those people for bringing this here!

Alicia wrote: "Personally, I'd like vanity and subsidy publishers not included, though their authors could be if they choose."

One big advantage of it being only ebooks is most indies who go this route are solo flyers like myself. But I agree your point.

Hope you participate and have a good experience and let us know how it goes!


message 7: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1014 comments Alicia wrote: "Small legitimate presses already have access to library distribution." Yes; theoretically, if a small press book is marketed online, or even carried by a wholesaler such as Ingram, the library market has "access" to it to purchase it. As a librarian, though, I'm aware of a significant difference between theory and actual practice.

Librarians typically don't even consider selecting a book by a new or unfamiliar author unless it's reviewed in a venue like the ALA's Booklist or Library Journal; and small-press titles are rarely reviewed there, even if the publisher can afford to take a chance on furnishing a review copy. Most small presses can not afford to offer the library discounts that library selectors usually demand. And very few library patrons have ever heard of most small-press books/authors, so pressure from that quarter to purchase these books is pretty much nil. :-(


message 8: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) | 102 comments E.M. wrote: "...One big advantage of it being only ebooks is most indies who go this route are solo flyers like myself. But I agree your point.

Hope you participate and have a good experience and let us know how it goes! "


I realized after I sent them my information that I will be out of the country on that day, the only time in two years. Sigh.

I still don't understand people who only do ebooks (unless their work is short). Createspace requires a pdf of the interior and a pdf of the cover - and that's it, and your print version is on Amazon.

I encourage you to think about print as easy - instead of earned.

Now, for libraries, you do have a problem - and I haven't tried that yet - if they want a hardcover. And the distribution may be much harder if you don't go with Ingram or something. No ideas there.


message 9: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) | 102 comments Werner wrote: "Alicia wrote: "Small legitimate presses already have access to library distribution." Yes; theoretically, if a small press book is marketed online, or even carried by a wholesaler such as Ingram, t..."

So true. Marketing and distribution are much harder than writing.

Indies have control over the process, so it will happen if they put the effort in; small press authors may have a harder time depending on their contracts.


message 10: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1014 comments Alicia wrote: "Now, for libraries, you do have a problem... if they want a hardcover."

The popular (mis)perception that present-day libraries are reluctant to purchase paperbacks is based on the historical memory that in the 1950s, when paperbacks were relatively newfangled things, some librarians were openly disdainful and suspicious of the new and untried medium. However, that attitude has long since gone the way of the dodo. All modern libraries purchase paperbacks, and many have special paperback racks to display them to better advantage. When I do up to-order forms for books at the BC library, I always do them for a paperback edition, if there is one, to save money; and I believe that's a fairly common practice on the part of library selectors.


message 11: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) | 102 comments Werner wrote: "Alicia wrote: "Now, for libraries, you do have a problem... if they want a hardcover."

The popular (mis)perception that present-day libraries are reluctant to purchase paperbacks is based on the h..."


But do they file them on the regular shelves? We have racks of mass-market paperbacks in various places - I don't think they even have catalog numbers. Mostly Romance and mysteries, some SFF.

I haven't checked in a while - the energy to go around the library is significant - but I remember the last time I did, and the only books on the shelves were hardcovers, probably sturdier library editions. I'll check again next time I go.


message 12: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1014 comments The Bluefield College library definitely files paperbacks on the regular shelves (we don't own any mass market paperback racks, but trade paperbacks wouldn't fit on those anyway). That was also the practice in two public libraries I worked at in Indiana in the 80s (though we also used paperback racks to house some of the mass market paperbacks in a more space-efficient way). I haven't made a special attempt to observe other libraries that do the same, since it never occurred to me that any might do it differently --it's never been an issue discussed in library school or library trade journals and conferences-- but I'll have to do that the next time I visit another library.

Libraries do sometimes refrain from cataloging donated books if they expect their appeal to be ephemeral and their shelf life to be short. All books in that category tend to be paperbacks, but not all paperbacks are in that category (if that distinction makes any sense :-) ). Some paperbacks may also be re-bound in Mylar bindings to make them more durable (especially if the binding is falling apart); but library bindery budgets in the U.S. have tended to take a hit because of the ongoing recessed/depressed economic conditions.


message 13: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) | 102 comments Everything educational is taking a hit, which I think is shortsighted. Education is the expenditure with the largest return on investment.

I'll have to stop by one of these days, and see where they've put me! I donated a couple of copies to my local public library.

Or is that an embarrassing question for them - if they have handed my books over to the Friends of the Library booksale! Maybe shouldn't ask.

IF you have done enough publicity, people will be clamoring for you book when it appears in the library. If not, you won't circulate much. Same as usual: the rich get richer.

I have so much to do on the promoting side - but I'm focusing on finishing the trilogy, so it will have to wait.

Also, I need to visit the two other public libraries within driving distance, and possibly the Princeton U. Library. If they accept books from alumni and staff.

Does yours?


message 14: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1014 comments Alicia wrote: "Or is that an embarrassing question for them --if they have handed my books over to the Friends of the Library booksale!" A painless way to find out would be simply to look up the books by title or author in the library's online catalog, to see if they're listed, and where they're shelved. (You actually can do that from your home computer, without even visiting the library.) But it's not likely they handed your books over to be sold; most public libraries are eager to stock books by local authors, even indies.

After I posted message 12, it occurred to me that many of the interlibrary loan books I've handled over the years, for myself and others (that's another of my jobs at the BC library), which we borrowed from other libraries, have been paperbacks. That means the lending libraries both own them as part of their collections and have them in their catalogs (otherwise, those particular paperback holdings wouldn't show up in the OCLC World Catalog database, which was where I found them to request them, in the first place.)

Alicia wrote: "If you have done enough publicity, people will be clamoring for your book when it appears in the library." Hmm! I'm not aware of any indie author's books that people have ever clamored for in a library --though, granted, none of their books have ever gotten the publicity that those put out by Big Publishing often get. My book has circulated some in the local libraries (and been stolen three times!), but people haven't clamored for it. I'm open to suggestions for publicity methods that will produce that result! :-)

Alicia wrote: "If they accept books from alumni and staff. Does yours?" Yes, Alicia, we certainly do; in fact, we accept donations from just about anybody, as long as he/she got the books legally! (If they're titles we already have, or that aren't what we need for the collection, we'll put the books on the free rack; but we appreciate any donation we receive.) We've also accepted several donations from indie authors (not necessarily local ones) over the years, as long as the books aren't erotica and don't have excessive foul language, etc.


message 15: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) | 102 comments I'm impressed - your book has been stolen three times! I'm guessing it was popular, and the borrower didn't want to let go of it.

There are other interpretations; ignore them - since you'll probably never know for sure, pick the one which suits you and encourages you.

I'll check my online catalog - of course! Why didn't I think of that?

And the other libraries have phone numbers - I can call their acquisitions departments. Part of Pride's Children, for example, is set in Princeton and on the university campus - that may be enough for them to be at least mildly interested.

It goes on the (very long) To Do list.

Merci.


message 16: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1014 comments Glad I could help, Alicia!

Yes, over the years since 2004, my novel has been stolen from the shelves of the BC library twice, and from those of the public library once. This could have been done by someone who was scandalized by the idea of vampire fiction in the library, and wanted to cleanse the shelves; but since our other vampire books weren't bothered, and all of the patron feedback we've gotten has been complimentary, our honest theory is that the thieves were people who wanted to own a copy, and figured it was cheaper to steal one off the shelf than to buy one. (That's not something I encourage!)


message 17: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) | 102 comments I still think it's people who intend to return your books - after they've read them and lent them to all their friends and relatives.

Of course, they could BUY some.


message 18: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1014 comments Alicia wrote: "I still think it's people who intend to return your books - after they've read them and lent them to all their friends and relatives.

Of course, they could BUY some."


That WOULD be nice! :-)


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