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message 1: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments I have chosen the author of the month for August. It is....(drum roll):

John Douglas


message 2: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments John Edward Douglas is a former special agent and unit chief in the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). He was one of the first criminal profilers and has written books on criminal psychology.


message 5: by Lady ♥ Belleza, Gif Princesa (new)

Lady ♥ Belleza (bella_foxx) | 3415 comments Mod
Thanks for remembering this Koren and starting the thread.


message 6: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Lady♥Belleza★✰ wrote: "Thanks for remembering this Koren and starting the thread."

You are welcome Belleza. I've been trying to decide for months but made my final decision today. I think there will be lots of room for discussion.


message 8: by Rita (new)

Rita (crimesleuthjunkie) | 1111 comments Oh gosh, I haven't read anything by John Douglas. I am sure his books are fascinating though.


message 9: by Shelley (new)

Shelley | 1225 comments Add: Sexual Homicide: Patterns and Motives to the list. I read it years ago and gave it 4 Stars.

Also read:
Law & Disorder - 4 Stars
Inside the Mind of BTK - 4 Stars
Journey Into Darkness - 4 Stars
The Cases That Haunt Us - 3 Stars
Mindhunter: Inside the FBI's Elite Serial Crime Unit - 3 Stars

Good books but he can come across as egotistical sometimes. Seems to be a common trait of profilers.

The only other one I might read is The Anatomy of Motive.


message 10: by Lady ♥ Belleza, Gif Princesa (new)

Lady ♥ Belleza (bella_foxx) | 3415 comments Mod
I do have "The mind of btk" have to add it to my tablet so i can read it


message 11: by Terri (new)

Terri (terrilovescrows) | 292 comments I have read many of his over the years and really enjoyed them. When he and his partner formed Mindhunters, a company I worked with did business with them and that is how I found out about them. I have several in my TBR piles as well


message 12: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Koren wrote: "I will be reading Law & Disorder: The Legendary FBI Profiler's Relentless Pursuit of Justice and [book:The Anatomy of Motive: The FBI's Legendary Mindhunter Explores the Key to Unde..."

The two books I have are pretty thick so I think that is all I will tackle for the month.


message 13: by Fishface (new)

Fishface | 13698 comments I just sent for Law & Disorder: The Legendary FBI Profiler's Relentless Pursuit of Justice, as I was planning to get to that one anyway.


message 14: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Started Anatomy of Motive and I'm stalled at p. 98. This is just too text-bookish for me. Going to start Law and Disorder and may come back to Anatomy of Motive when I am done. So far Law and Disorder is going better. I'm not really sure how the story about the Salem Witch Trials ties in at the beginning. I know he explains it at the end of the chapter but I still dont get it.


message 15: by Fishface (new)

Fishface | 13698 comments I am halfway into Law & Disorder and it's utterly riveting.


message 16: by Koren (last edited Aug 16, 2016 06:51AM) (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments I'm up to page 100 of Law and Disorder and agree with Fishface. This will give me a lot of insight when I read other TC books. For those who haven't read John Douglas yet, he is a profiler, someone who gets into the minds of killers to see what makes them tick and helps solve crimes based on common traits. Here is something interesting. On page 92 (my paperback copy) he explains that eye witness testimony can change as witnesses learn more about what happened. For instance, if a witness thinks that a suspect's behavior seemed unusual at the time, suddenly when the witness finds out that the suspect has been accused of murder the witness decides the suspects behavior at the time was EVEN MORE UNUSUAL than previously thought. Thoughts?


message 17: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Koren wrote: "I'm up to page 100 of Law and Disorder and agree with Fishface. This will give me a lot of insight when I read other TC books. For those who haven't read John Douglas yet, he is a profiler, someone..."

One typo noted on page 93. Todd Willingham was, indeed, executed on Feb. 17. However, I don't believe that would have been Valentines Day.


message 18: by Terri (new)

Terri (terrilovescrows) | 292 comments Koren wrote: "I'm up to page 100 of Law and Disorder and agree with Fishface. This will give me a lot of insight when I read other TC books. For those who haven't read John Douglas yet, he is a profiler, someone..."

That actually makes sense. Memories are easy to distort without meaning to.


message 19: by Fishface (new)

Fishface | 13698 comments Koren wrote: "
Here is something interesting. On page 92 (my paperback copy) he explains that eye witness testimony can change as witnesses learn more about what happened. For instance, if a witness thinks that a suspect's behavior seemed unusual at the time, suddenly when the witness finds out that the suspect has been accused of murder the witness decides the suspects behavior at the time was EVEN MORE UNUSUAL than previously thought. Thoughts?


That struck me as very, very true. I've certainly done it myself.


message 20: by Terri (new)

Terri (terrilovescrows) | 292 comments A very interesting exhibit in The National Crime & Punishment Museum had you watch a VERY short video of a suspect (just a glimpse like you might see). Then they have you answer a bunch of questions (hair color, clothes etc...) and even knowing you have to pay attention, it is REALLY hard to get it right


message 21: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Terri wrote: "A very interesting exhibit in The National Crime & Punishment Museum had you watch a VERY short video of a suspect (just a glimpse like you might see). Then they have you answer a bunch of question..."

That would be very interesting. I'm sure I would be horrible at that. I cant remember anything for two seconds.


message 22: by Shelley (last edited Aug 16, 2016 12:40PM) (new)

Shelley | 1225 comments I took a few of those eye witness tests they have online. I did terrible.


message 23: by Terri (new)

Terri (terrilovescrows) | 292 comments It's no wonder eyewitness testimony is often so inaccurate


message 24: by Fishface (new)

Fishface | 13698 comments Koren wrote: "Koren wrote: "I'm up to page 100 of Law and Disorder and agree with Fishface. This will give me a lot of insight when I read other TC books. For those who haven't read John Douglas yet, he is a pro..."

Yeah, I noticed that too! Now, Andrei Chikatilo was executed on February 14th, but almost no author makes note of the fact that it's Valentine's Day.


message 25: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Law & Disorder: The Legendary FBI Profiler's Relentless Pursuit of Justice

Page 176: As the trial got underway she saw the manipulation continue. "The lawyers told Sedley to wear light blue"she recalls, "because it was an 'innocent' color".


I had never heard this before and the author does not explain why blue would make a difference in a court of law.

Any thoughts?


message 26: by Fishface (last edited Aug 20, 2016 10:38AM) (new)

Fishface | 13698 comments That line immediately made me think of all the discussion of what colors people should wear during the John T. Malloy's New Dress for Success era. There were whole training seminars on what to wear for job interviews. I went to one of them, as I was about to graduate college, and there were literally hours of intense conversation about what shade of gray was too flippant or too undertakerish, whether your jacket should be single- or double-breasted, and whether camel is ever an acceptable color to wear if you want to be taken seriously at an interview, especially for a job with a large company. I guess there is still some of that thinking hanging around. Remind me -- when was Sedley Alley tried? I know he killed Suzanne Collins at the very height of that ridiculous era, which was also the height of the Satanic Panic.


message 27: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Fishface wrote: "That line immediately made me think of all the discussion of what colors people should wear during the John T. Malloy's New Dress for Success era. There were whole training seminars..."

Convicted in 1987. Strangely enough, every job I've ever had I got without regard to what color I was wearing.


message 28: by Koren (last edited Aug 21, 2016 11:48AM) (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments thoughts on Law and Disorder:

I thought his views on capital punishment were fascinating. I'm kind of on the fence about capital punishment. I've always wondered if the person that does the job is as guilty of murder as the one that committed the crime. Also, as we know, it happens more often than we care to admit, especially people convicted before the advent of DNA testing, and the Innocence Project has found quite a few people that were falsely convicted. I like the author's viewpoint on capital punishment. I wont tell any more as it might be a spoiler. You will have to read the book to find out.


message 29: by Fishface (last edited Aug 21, 2016 12:12PM) (new)

Fishface | 13698 comments I like the way he appears to have really thought out all his opinions and fills you I on his thought process.

Honestly, Koren, to this day I hear people talking about what color to wear to the interview if you really want to job. I just got an e-mail from someone I worked with at the reform school who very gravely explained to me when we were both still there that she has gotten every job she ever applied for if she made sure to wear a shirt with a white collar. She said it makes you look honest, or something.


message 30: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Fishface wrote: "I like the way he appears to have really thought out all his opinions and fills you I on his thought process.

Honestly, Koren, to this day I hear people talking about what color to wear to the in..."


I will remember that next time I interview, which may be soon.

You probably wont believe this, but a couple of years ago I saw a gal come to an interview in t-shirt and hole-y jeans. Granted, she had worked there before so the boss knew her, but still...oh and she also brought her boyfriends two kids with her. And...she got the job. Oh, and she was pregnant. She worked until she went on maternity leave and then never came back because she wanted to stay home with her baby. No big loss.


message 31: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Law and Disorder: I like how the author gives his own opinion and then backs it up with facts. For example, on page 468 he writes about the Amanda Knox case:" I have never seen a judges ruling so bizarre or nonsensical". Then he backs it up with facts. This is so much better than some crime writers that just give the facts and don't elaborate.


message 32: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Chapter 33 of Law and Disorder offers ways to solve the problem of people being falsely accused of a crime. Very interesting.


message 33: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments For those who haven't read Law and Disorder yet, there are case histories of Jon Benet Ramsey, The West Memphis 3, and Amanda Kutcher. Probably most of us have read about these cases before but the author offers solutions to solving these cases and opinions on why the investigations went wrong. Interesting stuff!


message 34: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Koren wrote: "Started Anatomy of Motive and I'm stalled at p. 98. This is just too text-bookish for me. Going to start Law and Disorder and may come back to Anatomy of Motive when I am done. So far Law and Disor..."

OK. I figured out how the Salem Witch trials tie into the book. You have to get to the end of the book (Page 498) to find out. Now if I haven't whetted your appetite nothing will.


message 35: by Fishface (new)

Fishface | 13698 comments Yeah, on top of everything else, Douglas and Olshaker really know how to put together a well-constructed book.


message 36: by Fishface (new)

Fishface | 13698 comments Terri wrote: "It's no wonder eyewitness testimony is often so inaccurate"

A great whole book on this subject is Witness for the Defense: The Accused, the Eyewitness, and the Expert Who Puts Memory on Trial.


message 37: by Lady ♥ Belleza, Gif Princesa (new)

Lady ♥ Belleza (bella_foxx) | 3415 comments Mod
I have that book if anyone wants it.


message 38: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Fishface wrote: "Yeah, on top of everything else, Douglas and Olshaker really know how to put together a well-constructed book."

Yes, I would say it was very well written. At times my mind would start to wander when he is talking about case histories that I have already read about, but all in all, a good book.


message 39: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments I'm one-third into The Anatomy of Motive: The FBI's Legendary Mindhunter Explores the Key to Understanding and Catching Violent Criminals. I put this one aside to read Law & Disorder: The Legendary FBI Profiler's Relentless Pursuit of Justice. I'm glad I did. I am more into Anatomy of Motive now as it seems like an extension of the other book. Not sure which book came first and you don't have to read it in any order but I would recommend Law and Disorder first.


message 40: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Just wanted to point out an error on page 201 of The Anatomy of Motive: The FBI's Legendary Mindhunter Explores the Key to Understanding and Catching Violent Criminals. If I didn't live in Minnesota I wouldn't have caught it. There is no Chicago county in Minnesota. It's Chisago, pronounced Chi-sah-go.
Chi is like chit without the t.


message 41: by Fishface (new)

Fishface | 13698 comments Spellcheck strikes again!!!


message 42: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 1415 comments Fishface wrote: "Spellcheck strikes again!!!"

Maybe, although I can see how he could get it mixed up. One letter difference. On the next page he does talk about the real Chicago.


message 43: by SouthWestZippy (new)

SouthWestZippy Anyone You Want Me to Be A True Story of Sex and Death on the Internet by John E. Douglas
Anyone You Want Me to Be: A True Story of Sex and Death on the Internet
3 stars
Very disturbing book about sex predator, John Robinson. The lack of focus takes you away from the story and it is over the top with unnecessary details. Still worth reading but not one I would strongly recommend.


message 44: by Fishface (new)

Fishface | 13698 comments SouthWestZippy wrote: "Anyone You Want Me to Be A True Story of Sex and Death on the Internet by John E. Douglas
Anyone You Want Me to Be: A True Story of Sex and Death on the Internet
3 stars
Very disturbin..."


I agree 100% with your assessment of that book.


message 45: by SouthWestZippy (new)

SouthWestZippy Fishface wrote: "SouthWestZippy wrote: "Anyone You Want Me to Be A True Story of Sex and Death on the Internet by John E. Douglas
Anyone You Want Me to Be: A True Story of Sex and Death on the Internet..."



I agree 100% with your assessment of that book.


Thank you. :0)


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