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Archives > Guest Narrator Scott Brick - July 12 & 13

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message 1: by AudioFile (new)

AudioFile Mag | 1945 comments Good Morning. This is Aurelia for AudioFile and as promised, Scott Brick will be joining us today and tomorrow to answer questions and chat about all things audiobook.

Scott narrates everything from non-fiction to mystery, suspense, and lots of science fiction and fantasy. He won a 2010 Audie Award for Ron Chernow’s biography of our first president, Washington. This year, he won an Audie for his reading of Jurassic Park. There have been many other honors in between, including being named an AudioFile Golden Voice and winning several AudioFile Earphones Awards.

Given Scott’s special connection with science fiction and fantasy titles, we’re particularly delighted that he’s visiting during what we’re calling SciJuly.

Here’s Scott’s website: http://scottbrick.net.

Here’s his AudioFile page: http://www.audiofilemagazine.com/narr..., which includes a couple of videos of Scott.

Welcome Scott! I'll get the ball rolling with the question - Scott, your Jurassic Park reading was so fresh and your own. Did you banish all previous versions from your head to do it or did memories of the film actually help?


message 2: by Jeanie (new)

Jeanie | 3750 comments Hi Scott!

Thanks so much for interacting with us. My first question is general... what is your preparation for reading an audiobook like? How much time do you spend on the book before recording, do you ever get to consult with the author regarding characters or special pronunciations, how do you track your character voices, etc. Do you have any particular practices when recording--lots/no coffee, morning versus evening sessions, always wear a lucky t-shirt, etc.?

Finally--for now--what book or handful of books you've recorded stand out for you as favorites?


message 3: by MissSusie (new)

MissSusie | 2033 comments Hello Scott and welcome!

Most of your narrations I have listened to are mysteries I have truly enjoyed your narrations of Harlan Coben and Greg Hurwitz but I have also enjoyed your narration of Dead Wake by Erik Larson. So my question would be do you have a preference of Fiction or Non-Fiction? When I read non-fiction I always seem to end up doing more research on the subject do you ever find yourself still curious about a subject after you have narrated non-fiction? Or do you have a favorite Genre you enjoy a little more than others?

Again thanks so much for joining us!


message 4: by Grumpus, Hearing aide (last edited Jul 12, 2016 12:49PM) (new)

Grumpus | 473 comments Scott,

It is an honor to have you here!!

It was your reading of Alexander Hamilton that hooked me on the world of audiobooks forever and I have been a fan of yours and audiobook ever since. So, I just wanted to thank you for the introduction to audiobooks, your performance, and the positive impact that introduction has had upon my life; both in terms of allowing me to absorb more knowledge and entertainment while doing other things, which allowed me to be lucky enough to stumble upon Goodreads and setting up this audiobook group. This group has introduced me to so many friends and new books. I can’t imagine how I would have found so many great reads without this group. And to think, it all started with your reading of Alexander Hamilton. Just curious, how long did it take you to record that?

I have a bunch of questions for you but; I’ll leave just that one for you now in addition to my sincere thanks.


message 5: by Michael (new)

Michael (mobe1969) | 463 comments Scott,

Any news on the Second Chronicles of Thomas Covenant? I've purchased all your prior Thomas Covenant releases from your old web site, but news on the missing middle series has been absent the last 5 years.


message 6: by Donna (new)

Donna | -43 comments Hi Scott,

Welcome. It's hard not to gush all over the place because I'm a huge fan. All I need to see is your name as narrator and I'll pick up the audio.

I particularly enjoyed your reads of Orson Scott Card's work, Jurassic Park, David Baldacci's, Jon Krakauer's, Justin Cronin's, & Harlan Coben's stuff and even more.

I like that you do so many different genres. My question for you is how do authors "land you" as a narrator? Does it just happen or do they just line up and wait their turn? I've also wondered if the publisher matters or how well-read an author is.

Thanks Scott, and again welcome.


message 7: by Leslie (last edited Jul 12, 2016 03:50PM) (new)

Leslie | 581 comments Welcome Scott! I recently finished my first audiobook narrated by you -- First King of Shannara. I liked it even though I had in my head pronounced Shannara differently when I read the original 10-12 books in the series in paperback! It took me a while to adjust :)

Coincidentally, my next (and current) audiobook is also one you narrated -- In Cold Blood.


message 8: by AudioFile (new)

AudioFile Mag | 1945 comments Aurelia here to say that I completely messed up and didn't give Scott the info he needed to get on this morning. Beat me with a stick. He's coming soon. Huge apologies, everyone.


message 9: by Jeanie (new)

Jeanie | 3750 comments Scott is worth waiting for... no need to get out the sticks!


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Welcome Scott
I'll add my question to your list also.

My comment is also about Alexander Hamilton. I just started listening to it this week. You've done an outstanding job with it.

My question is , how do you feel about all the recent popularity of the book since the musical came out , and have you been fortunate enough to get to see it ?

I' d think it'd be exciting to be a part of the success and to see how many thousands have now purchased the book because of it.

Quite a clever idea . It makes me wonder what Mr Hamilton would think if he could see all this now. :)

Enjoy your visit with the group and thank you for helping me to get to know more about Alexander Hamilton.


message 11: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments AudioFile wrote: "Good Morning. This is Aurelia for AudioFile and as promised, Scott Brick will be joining us today and tomorrow to answer questions and chat about all things audiobook.

Scott narrates everything f..."


Hi Aurelia, thanks for inviting me and thanks for kicking things off with the first question! Regarding Jurassic Park, I had to do a bit of both: try to incorporate aspects of the film while completely jettisoning others. For instance, Jeff Goldblum is easily the most recognizable aspect of the movie franchise, yet the way the character Ian Malcolm is written it's pretty clear he's British; but when we recorded The Lost World, nearly 15 years ago (yep, we did them out of order, oops!) I'd made him American, like Goldblum, so I opted to be consistent with that choice for the original volume. Hammond, however, was nothing at all like he is in the film: he's Texan, not British, and he actually doesn't even like his grandkids. So in that case, we had to be faithful to the book.


message 12: by Ashley Marie (new)

Ashley Marie  | 294 comments Hi Scott!

I think the first audiobook of yours I listened to was The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America and I've loved your work ever since, nonfiction and fiction alike. You've become one of my go-to narrators and I get so excited when I see that the books in my OverDrive list are read by you, because they get bumped up to the front of the queue immediately.

I'm really partial to your nonfiction work because between the author's words and your reading, I'm utterly fascinated for the whole book. Chernow, Krakauer, Larson, and Philbrick have all become newly-loved authors of mine thanks to your reading.

Do you have a preference for what you read, fiction vs nonfiction? Do you have a favorite book you've narrated?


Incidentally, I just finished listening to 12 Years a Slave as narrated by Richard Allen, and saw the memoriam post on your website. I had no idea he'd passed away as this was my first audiobook by him. I'm glad he was able to touch your life in such a huge way.


message 13: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Manda wrote: "Hi Scott, I've just re listened to The Passage and am about to re listen to The Twelve prior to the eagerly awaited The City of Mirrors

My first ques..."


Hi Manda, thanks for the note and all the kind words! And no, I don't mind personal questions at all, I actually appreciate you asking about my health. I'm thrilled to say my doctors pronounced me cancer-free right before Christmas, which is easily the best gift I've ever received. I'm grateful to God every day. And actually, your first question about The Passage trilogy kinda touches on my health; the day I was diagnosed was four days before we were scheduled to record the second in the series, The Twelve. I got into a clinical trial and moved to New York with only three days' notice and started The Twelve on time, but in another city. My first call was actually to the publisher to try and switch things around, and I wondered, "Am I being crazy here, to focus on a book instead of my health?" But the first in the series was so brilliant that I knew it would be the greatest disappointment of my career if I missed out on the rest of the series.

Regarding Justin Cronin, he's just the loveliest guy, so kind and generous. I've met him on each of his book tours, and on the most recent one he outed me when someone in the audience talked about the audiobook scaring the crap out of her; Justin pointed to me and basically said, "Blame him!" Really, a truly great guy.

Lastly, yes, my experience during that trying time has made me a different man, and I carry those lessons with me today. And some of the books I read were absolutely instrumental to me getting better -- Salt, Sugar, Fat by Michael Moss fundamentally changed the way I eat and live my life now. So grateful.


message 14: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Jeanie wrote: "Hi Scott!

Thanks so much for interacting with us. My first question is general... what is your preparation for reading an audiobook like? How much time do you spend on the book before recording, d..."


Hi Jeanie, thanks for the questions, I'll try to answer as best I can. Prep for books can be a lot or a little, depending on the type of book I'm working on. Narrating straightforward thrillers may require no more than looking up names/geographical locations, whereas the Dune novel I'm working on right now has taken hours and hours and HOURS of prep. When I started that series in 2001 or thereabouts, I called Brian Herbert, son of Frank Herbert, to go over the way his father pronounced all those words and names he'd made up for the original volume, all 498 of them. I'd record the conversation, type everything out phonetically, then put it in an audio glossary I keep for the series. (There's a youtube video that shows it, I'll see if I can find the link and post it later.) Anyway, now that we're working on the 20th volume in the series, that glossary has grown to over 1800 words.

As for practices, my primary one is hydration: I never start recording until I've downed two liters of water, then continue to hydrate like mad while I'm in the studio.

Oh, and as for favorites, there are so many:

The Passage Trilogy
The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant
Fahrenheit 451
Salt, Sugar, Fat
Bladerunner
Alexander Hamilton/George Washington
Dead Wake
What Makes Sammy Run?
Pretty much the entire John Corey series by Nelson DeMille
You're Next by Gregg Hurwitz

Thanks for asking!


message 15: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments MissSusie wrote: "Hello Scott and welcome!

Most of your narrations I have listened to are mysteries I have truly enjoyed your narrations of Harlan Coben and Greg Hurwitz but I have also enjoyed your narration of De..."


Hi Miss Susie, great questions, and you mention many of my own favorite books as well. (Harlan Coben is a wonderful guy, so nice and generous, and Gregg Hurwitz has actually become a good friend, he lives not far from me in LA, he even came to my girlfriend's cookbook launch party. Terrific guy, brilliant writer!)

As for favorites, I try not to discriminate between fiction and non-, at least when I'm working, only because I always want to keep learning, and nothing does that like reading non-fiction. And yes, I often find myself wanting to learn more about subjects; in fact, while working on Dead Wake, I went to our local video store--which still has VHS tapes!--and rented everything I could find on the Lusitania. Many of the survivors and witnesses quoted in the book were shown on the documentaries, so I found it endlessly fascinating.

Lastly, as for favorite genres, when it comes to reading for pleasure, the books I read are typically science fiction and mystery/thrillers. Thankfully I've been able to narrate a number of my all time favorites!


message 16: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Grumpus wrote: "Scott,

It is an honor to have you here!!

It was your reading of Alexander Hamilton that hooked me on the world of audiobooks forever and I have been a fan of yours and audiobook ever since. So, I..."


Wow, Grumpus, I'm humbled by this, and quite grateful. Thank you for sharing that with me, it's an honor to have been your introduction to this wonderful world of audio...! Seriously, when you hear back from people who listen regularly, it's quite affecting, when we're in the studio it's easy to forget the impact our work has, especially for those who are vision-impaired. We don't want to sit around and lick ourselves like cats in self-congratulation or anything, but nevertheless we don't want to forget the fact that it helps. Anyway, I'm rambling, but again, thank you. As for how long it took to record, we typically record about three finished hours a day, and that book was about thirty two hours, is that right? So, probably eleven or twelve days. Eleven or twelve FASCINATING days, I learned so much! Oh, and when I moved to NY briefly for medical treatment, I lived in the building next door to Trinity Church, and my living room window looked down on Alexander Hamilton's grave. I went there the day before moving home to pay my respects. So great to see his story having such an impact on Broadway today!


message 17: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Michael wrote: "Scott,

Any news on the Second Chronicles of Thomas Covenant? I've purchased all your prior Thomas Covenant releases from your old web site, but news on the missing middle series has been absent th..."


Hello Michael, so great to talk to a Covenant fan here! And yes, I'm happy to say there is news: we just signed a contract last week for The Second Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the first volume, The Wounded Land, will be available on my website August 1st. We'll be sending out emails to everyone who purchased the previous series with details about the new ones. Thank you for your support in the past, as well as for your patience; I announced on my website several years ago that I'd had been diagnosed with cancer and had to focus on getting well for a while. Which I am, thankfully, so it's back to The Land I go! After finishing Covenant, we're also talking about doing his backlist: short story collection and the Reed Stephens mysteries as well. Again, many thanks!


message 18: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Donna wrote: "Hi Scott,

Welcome. It's hard not to gush all over the place because I'm a huge fan. All I need to see is your name as narrator and I'll pick up the audio.

I particularly enjoyed your reads of Or..."


Hi Donna, thanks for the kind words, and for mentioning so many of my favorite authors...! Seriously, it's an honor to be associated with all of their work. I am only as good as the elbows I rub, and those are some fabulous elbows indeed. As for how authors land me, it happens any number of ways: typically it's through the publishers (they'll get in touch and ask if I'm interested in doing a book, the answer to which is typically yes, I try not to turn down too much because I want to expose myself to more and more authors and learn as much as possible) but sometimes authors will get in touch directly and we'll figure out a way to make it happen. I've also approached certain favorite authors of mine to license their work and publish it myself, which has been hugely exciting and as creatively rewarding as anything I've ever done. I'm currently trying to secure the rights to a book about the making of my favorite film of all time, and just landed the rights to a biography of Frank Herbert call Dreamer of Dune, both of which I hope to have on sale before the end of the year. So, yeah, it can happen any number of ways. Thanks!


message 19: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Leslie wrote: "Welcome Scott! I recently finished my first audiobook narrated by you -- First King of Shannara. I liked it even though I had in my head pronounced Shannara differently when I read the..."

Hi Leslie, funny you mention Shannara: when I interviewed him years ago for a magazine article, Terry Books told me over and over it was SHAN-uh-ruh. Later, when I called him to verify this before narrating four of those books, he told me the same thing. Well, now the TV series has come out and they either didn't pay attention or never asked Brooks, because they pronounce it shuh-NAH-ruh! Ah well, I'm pretty sure if asked now, Brooks wouldn't mind it, either way. ;-)

I hope you enjoy In Cold Blood as much as I did! A political reporter from the NY Times wrote an article about audiobooks recently, how she's listening to them while driving around the country on the campaign trail. In it, she said that I scared her so badly while driving through Kansas, listening to In Cold Blood, that she couldn't get out of her car. I perversely felt really terrific about that!


message 20: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments AudioFile wrote: "Aurelia here to say that I completely messed up and didn't give Scott the info he needed to get on this morning. Beat me with a stick. He's coming soon. Huge apologies, everyone."

No worries, I found it! Thanks again for having me, this is great!


message 21: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Jeanie wrote: "Scott is worth waiting for... no need to get out the sticks!"

Hahahaha! Thanks!


message 22: by AudioFile (new)

AudioFile Mag | 1945 comments Jeanie wrote: "Scott is worth waiting for... no need to get out the sticks!"

Thanks Jeanie.


message 23: by AudioFile (new)

AudioFile Mag | 1945 comments Scott wrote: "AudioFile wrote: "Good Morning. This is Aurelia for AudioFile and as promised, Scott Brick will be joining us today and tomorrow to answer questions and chat about all things audiobook.

Scott nar..."


That is fascinating. What nuanced thinking- for which we listeners thank you! Including those of us who loved the book and the film - and now the audiobook.


message 24: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Julie wrote: "Welcome Scott
I'll add my question to your list also.

My comment is also about Alexander Hamilton. I just started listening to it this week. You've done an outstanding job with it.

My question ..."


Hi Julie, wonderful question. Seeing America discover and embrace Alexander Hamilton through the musical has been hugely rewarding for me. Working on that book was a terrific highlight of my career, and I respect Ron Chernow so much for how much he's educated us about our Founding Fathers, and to see him serve as the technical adviser for the musical is just wonderful. As for how Hamilton himself would feel, I think he'd feel hugely vindicated; he was a very misunderstood man, often reviled (by some) in his time, and as a result of his life being cut short, never got the recognition he deserved. But the financial system he built has weathered the test of time, the policies he created for the Coast Guard were still as he'd written them all the way into the Kennedy administration, and his name is now known by more Americans than at any other time in our nation's history. I think he would be proud indeed. Thank you for your question, it's always a privilege to get to speak about Hamilton! (Oh, and no, like everybody else it's maddening trying to score tickets...! But it's here in LA now so I'm hopeful.)


message 25: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Ashley *Hufflepuff Kitten* wrote: "Hi Scott!

I think the first audiobook of yours I listened to was The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America and I've loved your work ever..."


Wow, Ashley, those books all were deeply affecting, Erik Larson's work just blows me away. I hadn't narrated anything of his after Devil in the White City, so being picked for Dead Wake was a privilege. I love both fiction and non-fiction, simply because I learn so much from both.

And regarding Richard Allen, well, I still miss him every day. I mentioned him in a class I taught about narration just the other day in fact. He passed so young, and there were so many more books for him to read, but I'm grateful for all those he left behind. I still have not listened to 12 Years a Slave, I think I've been saving it up until the time was right, but I have listened to his production of Uncle Tom's Cabin, and that man was brilliant. Thanks for mentioning him, it's always great to talk about Richard.


message 26: by CatBookMom (new)

CatBookMom | 1082 comments Hi, Scott! Thanks for taking the time to join us. It's interesting to read your comments on the research you do for a book.

I bought Jurassic Park last summer the day the audio was released, and really enjoyed listening to it. I wanted to ask how you decide on the pacing of your narration, the emphasis or excitement that you choose to add.

And, of course, do you listen to audiobooks in your so-called spare time?


message 27: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments AudioFile wrote: "Scott wrote: "AudioFile wrote: "Good Morning. This is Aurelia for AudioFile and as promised, Scott Brick will be joining us today and tomorrow to answer questions and chat about all things audioboo..."

Well, it's always a delicate balance: how much to you bow to the popular version of the story, versus how much do you want to make it its own original thing? Sometimes you have to faithfully present the way it's done in the book (you can't growl while doing Frankenstein the way Boris Karloff did, the monster actually narrates about 40% of the book...!) but others you have to bow to what's expected: I did The Graduate, and just HAD TO read "Elaine!!! Elaine!!!!" like Dustin Hoffman did in the film.


message 28: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments CatBookMom wrote: "Hi, Scott! Thanks for taking the time to join us. It's interesting to read your comments on the research you do for a book.

I bought Jurassic Park last summer the day the audio was..."


Great questions! I thin the pace is always determined by the action, but in kind of the reverse of how you'd expect it: when the action speeds up, we need to slow down. It's counter-intuitive, almost perverse in a way, but nothing will amp up the tension more than slowing down when the audience wants you to speed up. But there's also the technical aspect of it: if we sped up our pace during action sequences, the listener would probably miss most of it. Then there's also parts where you have to let the tension flow out of the scene, present it where it sounds like all will be well again, but usually only in scenes right before something really scary or surprising happens. All storytelling is manipulation: we don't mind it, though, when we're being manipulated artfully, and when doing an audiobook, I have to be sensitive the way the author manipulates the audience and try to help him or her do their job.

Loved Jurassic Park! Thanks for bringing it up, love talking about the book.


message 29: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments CatBookMom wrote: "Hi, Scott! Thanks for taking the time to join us. It's interesting to read your comments on the research you do for a book.

I bought Jurassic Park last summer the day the audio was..."


Oh, sorry, forgot the last question:

I ABSOLUTELY listen to audiobooks! Every spare moment I can. Some personal favorites are the Robert Galbraith/J.K.Rowling mysteries, The Book Thief, the Harry Hole books by Jo Nesbo (Robin Sacks is easily my favorite narrator of all time, it is such a devastating shame that he's gone), and In a Dark, Dark Wood (Imogen Church is mind-bogglyingly good!).

I'm currently splitting time between three books:

Living on Air by Joe Cipriano (fascinating memoir of a man who started in radio, then became THE voice in TV promos)

Huckleberry Finn, narrated by Patrick Fraley (legendary in the VO world, has done more than 4,000 hours of animation, his voices are brilliant...!)

Killing Floor, the first Jack Reacher novel, narrated by Dick Hill. Dick is an old friend, we were introduced by Richard Allen years ago, but this is the first time I'm listening to one of his books...! Having a blast.


message 30: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Okay, everyone, just found a great old video on youtube that we made eons ago while putting together the multi-voice audiobook of Dune by Frank Herbert. I was asked earlier by Jeanie about the prep we do, and my answer dealt with the audio glossary I've assembled for the series. Well, the video shows how that all came together. Lots of fun seeing those faces: Simon Vance, Katy Kellgren and Euan Morton! Hope you enjoy it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vENYX...


message 31: by CatBookMom (new)

CatBookMom | 1082 comments Scott wrote: "Okay, everyone, just found a great old video on youtube that we made eons ago while putting together the multi-voice audiobook of Dune by Frank Herbert. I was asked earlier by Jeanie about the prep..."

Loved it! Dune is one of the first multi-voice audiobooks I heard, and it is outstanding. Thanks for sharing this fun.


message 32: by Mara (new)

Mara Pemberton (marapem) | 233 comments Scott,

I believe when I listened to THE DIVIDE by Nicholas Evans was the first time I encountered you being the narrator of the book. You wonderful and your voice so pleasant to my ears.

I know there have been a few other books you have narrated but I can't remember them now.

I am a big David Baldacci fan and I know you narrated a couple of the KING & MAXWELL books. I personally wish you had narrated all of the KING & MAXWELL series.

You are in my top 10 of great narrators, along with Kate Reading, Barbara Rosenbalt, and Susan Eriksen and a few others.


message 33: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments CatBookMom wrote: "Scott wrote: "Okay, everyone, just found a great old video on youtube that we made eons ago while putting together the multi-voice audiobook of Dune by Frank Herbert. I was asked earlier by Jeanie ..."

Oh I'm so glad. It was great seeing it today, especially, because I'm immersed in the Dune universe on the latest novel in the saga. Glad you enjoyed it!


message 34: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Mara wrote: "Scott,

I believe when I listened to THE DIVIDE by Nicholas Evans was the first time I encountered you being the narrator of the book. You wonderful and your voice so pleasant to my ears.

I know..."


Thanks so much, Mara, you've put me in some great company...! Kate, Barbara and Susan are all friends of mine, and terrific narrators, I love listening to them. And yes, I did the first handful of King and Maxwell books, really enjoyed those, and I have to say, Baldacci is such a nice guy, very generous, not to mention creative. Thanks for listening!


message 35: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 581 comments Scott wrote: "Leslie wrote: "Welcome Scott! I recently finished my first audiobook narrated by you -- First King of Shannara. I liked it even though I had in my head pronounced Shannara differently ..."

After the second or third time I heard SHAN-uh-rah, I poked around on the web looking for information about how it was supposed to be pronounced. I did find info saying Brooks considered it to be pronounced with the accent on the first syllable, so I sadly concluded that I had been mispronouncing it for years! You have just confirmed that ;)


message 36: by Michael (new)

Michael (mobe1969) | 463 comments Scott,

That is fantastic news on the Second Chronicles. I look forward to the email. I'm still on the same address as when I purchased the others!

Fantastic news!


message 37: by Grumpus, Hearing aide (new)

Grumpus | 473 comments I'd like to know how you got started in the industry and more specifically, I always like to ask about the "aha" moment. The time when you first realized you had a special voice, one upon which you thought you'd could make a living with it.


message 38: by [deleted user] (new)

Scott
I was wondering how many authors of the books you've narrated , have you gotten to meet ?

Also, have you been a lifelong reader, and who would you credit for giving you such a love of books ?


message 39: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (stewartry) | 196 comments It's supposed to be "SHAN-uh-rah"?? Count me in with the people who've been saying it wrong for always ...

Welcome, Scott, and thank you for taking the time to hang out with us! I'm another fan of your reading of Alexander Hamilton (just last month I went from loving the book to beginning to appreciate the musical (which I'm sure I'll never get to see)) - I think it's wonderful that not only is Hamilton getting all the attention he ever could have wished for, but Eliza too is finally emerging from the shadows and getting recognition for her strength and loyalty. Thank you for a beautiful narration of a fantastic book.

I appreciated your blog post on "breaking into narration" - I revisit it now and then trying to bolster my courage to do something about it. I was going to ask you about getting started, but that post is terrific - so, no questions, just: thank you!

Wait, I do have a question - how are you?


message 40: by John, Moderator (last edited Jul 13, 2016 07:43AM) (new)

John | 3724 comments Hey, Scott!

I had heard of your work for a long time, but you seem to work on books (genres) that just don't intersect with my reading. And then, along came The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, which I really liked. Now that the project's a done deal, did you have to think about whether you wanted to accept that that job at all?


message 41: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Leslie wrote: "Scott wrote: "Leslie wrote: "Welcome Scott! I recently finished my first audiobook narrated by you -- First King of Shannara. I liked it even though I had in my head pronounced Shannar..."

Heh heh, for what it's worth, Leslie, every time that name came out of my mouth, I had to struggle to say it Brooks' way, my instinct has always been to say it the same way as you!


message 42: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Michael wrote: "Scott,

That is fantastic news on the Second Chronicles. I look forward to the email. I'm still on the same address as when I purchased the others!

Fantastic news!"


I'm so glad, and thanks for letting me know about the address. I'll be writing the email later today, then after that, we're just waiting for the cover artwork. Soon...!


message 43: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Grumpus wrote: "I'd like to know how you got started in the industry and more specifically, I always like to ask about the "aha" moment. The time when you first realized you had a special voice, one upon which you..."

Like most narrators, I got started by being an actor; I'd been a working actor for over ten years by the time I got my first narration gig. For me, the "Aha!" moment came when I was a Theater major at UCLA. I auditioned for a professor, Gary Gardner, at the beginning of my third year, and he took me aside afterward and said, "What have you done with your voice?" I had no idea what he meant, so I said I didn't do anything to it. "No," he said, "somewhere over the summer you realized it was a very potent instrument and you learned how to use it." I just shook my head, had no idea what he was talking about, but I trusted that something had happened, even if I couldn't recognize it. Now, I didn't think, "Aha, audiobooks!" or "Voiceover!" or anything like that, but when I think back now to the beginning of my voiceover career, it was that day in room 1330.

The cool third act of the story is that last year UCLA brought me back to the Theater Department as an instructor, I'm teaching two classes on campus, Audiobook Narration and Introduction to Voiceover, the latter of which was taught in room 1330. The first day of class, I stood in the spot where I'd stood all those years ago and told the class my story about Gary Gardner. Then I went outside to the spot where Gary would always grab a smoke, what we call the Gary Gardner Memorial Bench, and thanked him.


message 44: by Grumpus, Hearing aide (new)

Grumpus | 473 comments Scott wrote: "Grumpus wrote: "I'd like to know how you got started in the industry and more specifically, I always like to ask about the "aha" moment. The time when you first realized you had a special voice, on..."

Great story! Thanks for sharing it with us.


message 45: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Julie wrote: "Scott
I was wondering how many authors of the books you've narrated , have you gotten to meet ?

Also, have you been a lifelong reader, and who would you credit for giving you such a love of books ?"


I wish I'd been able to meet them all, especially those that are gone now, but I'm grateful to have met as many as I have. To me, that's my favorite part of this business, meeting the men and women whose work I've loved for years and years. I mean, I got into this business because I'm just like you, first and foremost I'm a book fan, so meeting your favorite authors is an absolute thrill. And quite a few of them have become a huge part of my life, close friends.

I started an album on Facebook a while ago, Pictures with Authors or something along those lines, and keep meaning to add new shots to it that I've collected over the years. One of these days...


message 46: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Julie wrote: "Scott
I was wondering how many authors of the books you've narrated , have you gotten to meet ?

Also, have you been a lifelong reader, and who would you credit for giving you such a love of books ?"


Woops, sorry, forgot the last question: I think my love of books came from my parents. Not only would they read to me at night, but they encouraged me to read anything I wished. (Within reason, of course.) When I developed a passion for comic books, they supported it, this despite the fact that they'd grown up through an era where comic books were not only discouraged but almost suppressed as a communist influence. (Any book fans have a copy of Seduction of the Innocent out there...?) And I think that was key. LeVar Burton said something like that as well, "If your kid loves to read and wants to read comic books, let him read comic books!" Ultimately that love of reading is what's most important, not just the subject matter.

I absolutely attribute my success to my passion for reading. Without a doubt.


message 47: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments Tracey wrote: "It's supposed to be "SHAN-uh-rah"?? Count me in with the people who've been saying it wrong for always ...

Welcome, Scott, and thank you for taking the time to hang out with us! I'm another fan o..."


Thanks Tracey, I'm glad the post was a help to you, and here's hoping you do something along those lines very soon! No pressure, of course, but I think we're all happier when we indulge our creative side, in whatever avenue that leads us. And thanks for the reminder, I wrote that post close to ten years ago, when the industry was different, so I should really update it a bit.

Lastly, I'm great, thank you for asking. I haven't written and posted any updates on my health, only because when I wrote about my illness and my choices to treat it, I got the most horrendously angry mail in response, from fans and friends alike, so I chose not to open myself to anything like that again and only tell people when they ask. But I am well, and cancer free, and hugely grateful.


message 48: by Scott (new)

Scott Brick | 39 comments John wrote: "Hey, Scott!

I had heard of your work for a long time, but you seem to work on books (genres) that just don't intersect with my reading. And then, along came [book:The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry|18..."


Hey John, thanks for mentioning one of my all time favorite books. LOVED The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry. As for your question, I'm not sure I'm understanding it, because for the life of me I can't for a moment think of any reason why I wouldn't have wanted to do it. It was beautiful from start to finish, and the ending was so poignant that I delayed finishing the book for an extra day or two, simply so I could prolong the experience. Wonderful book, beautiful writing. Thanks again!


message 49: by Denise (new)

Denise (drams5) | 84 comments Hi Scott- thank you so much for taking the time to join us! I love Jo Nesbo (the audio of The Son was amazing) and Ruth Ware, too!

I'm enjoying reading your Q&A and wanted to say congratulations on your cancer remission. Thanks for bringing so many great books to life! (My most recent listens were Harlan Coben titles -- nice job!)

Thanks again!


message 50: by Mara (new)

Mara Pemberton (marapem) | 233 comments Scott,

All I can say is that many of the new narrators that are up and coming can learn a lot from you and many of my other favorites narrators.

Hope listen to a book soon with you as the narrator.

Wish producers if audiobooks would realize that what you is an ART just like writing, and acting.


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