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The Reason I Jump: The Inner Voice of a Thirteen-Year-Old Boy with Autism
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Previous BRs - Authors; E - H > Higashida, Naoki- The Reason I Jump: The Inner Voice of a Thirteen-Year-Old Boy with Autism- Informal Buddy Read; Starts July 10, 2016

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message 1: by Moderators of NBRC, Challenger-in-Chief (new)

Moderators of NBRC | 31507 comments Mod


This topic is open for discussion of The Reason I Jump: The Inner Voice of a Thirteen-Year-Old Boy with Autism by Naoki Higashida.

Synopsis:
You’ve never read a book like The Reason I Jump. Written by Naoki Higashida, a very smart, very self-aware, and very charming thirteen-year-old boy with autism, it is a one-of-a-kind memoir that demonstrates how an autistic mind thinks, feels, perceives, and responds in ways few of us can imagine. Parents and family members who never thought they could get inside the head of their autistic loved one at last have a way to break through to the curious, subtle, and complex life within.

Using an alphabet grid to painstakingly construct words, sentences, and thoughts that he is unable to speak out loud, Naoki answers even the most delicate questions that people want to know. Questions such as: “Why do people with autism talk so loudly and weirdly?” “Why do you line up your toy cars and blocks?” “Why don’t you make eye contact when you’re talking?” and “What’s the reason you jump?” (Naoki’s answer: “When I’m jumping, it’s as if my feelings are going upward to the sky.”) With disarming honesty and a generous heart, Naoki shares his unique point of view on not only autism but life itself. His insights—into the mystery of words, the wonders of laughter, and the elusiveness of memory—are so startling, so strange, and so powerful that you will never look at the world the same way again.

In his introduction, bestselling novelist David Mitchell writes that Naoki’s words allowed him to feel, for the first time, as if his own autistic child was explaining what was happening in his mind. “It is no exaggeration to say that The Reason I Jump allowed me to round a corner in our relationship.” This translation was a labor of love by David and his wife, KA Yoshida, so they’d be able to share that feeling with friends, the wider autism community, and beyond. Naoki’s book, in its beauty, truthfulness, and simplicity, is a gift to be shared.


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Moderators of NBRC | 31507 comments Mod
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Laura | 9707 comments I'm looking forward to reading this! I have the kindle addition so no page numbers. I will use locations and % in my spoilers.


Laura | 9707 comments Here we go:-) I'm not very far in.
12% Preface

(view spoiler)

I work with children with special needs.


message 6: by Laura (last edited Jul 10, 2016 09:39AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Laura | 9707 comments Up to 25% Q 13 Do you prefer to be on your own?

(view spoiler) I am so impressed with this young man!


Beth | 1601 comments I just started as well.

I have a son diagnosed with Asperger's, so I've dipped my toes in some of these issues. His language skills are great and he's very bright, but from kindergarten on he always seemed a bit different from other kids. Learning about autism really helped understand him and give him the tools to succeed, as well as figure out where upcoming problems might be. I'm looking forward to this book to see another's boy journey.

My nephew has special needs, so I spend a lot of time in his class and have seen and worked with kids with a much more difficult diagnosis. So that's my background :-)

(view spoiler)


Laura | 9707 comments Up to 50%
(view spoiler)


message 9: by Laura (last edited Jul 10, 2016 12:30PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Laura | 9707 comments finished
(view spoiler)
I gave it a 5 stars!


Laura | 9707 comments Beth wrote: "I just started as well.

I have a son diagnosed with Asperger's, so I've dipped my toes in some of these issues. His language skills are great and he's very bright, but from kindergarten on he alwa..."


I'm pleased to hear that your family doesn't have that problem with feeling "different". It is society that I have a problem with as it is society that labels people as different. I love David Mitchell's comment at 96 % in (view spoiler)


message 11: by Beth (new) - rated it 4 stars

Beth | 1601 comments But it is society that I want to accept the idea of different as real and OK.

I just finished the physical copy, and I'm getting the kindle version from the library so I can see the afterward. Mine ended with Higashida's short story (view spoiler)

I want a society that accepts difference, even differences that require accommodations. We do need to label people as different when they are different. Putting children like Naoki in a regular classroom and punishing him for not following rules would be terrible. The problem is the idea that different is bad, that different is less than.

I loved Naoki's voice, but I didn't hear him saying he wasn't different. He was saying he's still valuable, he is worth loving, he has important things to say.

I gave it 4 stars, because I wanted a few more acknowledgements that different people deal with autism in different ways. There are few things that are true about everyone. Of course, the author was only 13, so I don't expect him to fully grasp that yet.


Laura | 9707 comments Beth wrote: "But it is society that I want to accept the idea of different as real and OK.

I just finished the physical copy, and I'm getting the kindle version from the library so I can see the afterward. Min..."


My copy had the afterward and I enjoyed that as well. I agree with most of what you are saying. I too would love to see a society that accepts differences but so far I don't see that happening. I saw and still see children like Naoki put in a regular classroom and "punished" for not following rules. It is terrible and sickening and just plain sad.

Thanks so much Beth for buddy reading this book with me! Hopefully others will read it too and we can come back and chat with them as well.


message 13: by Beth (new) - rated it 4 stars

Beth | 1601 comments Thanks Nancy! I was glad we both read the book in a day!


Charlie (miss_charlie_d) | 178 comments I'm going to get this at the library this afternoon. My niece has severe autism, and I've read quite a few biographies, mostly from parents. I started In a Different Key: The Story of Autism, and it is fantastic. It's shelved right now, and probably will be until the end of WOBBLE, but I'd recommend it to anyone just from the few chapters I read. Sienna is the most wonderful human being in my life and I wish everyone would take the time to understand autism on a deeper level.

PS. This will be my first buddy read.


Laura | 9707 comments Charlie wrote: "I'm going to get this at the library this afternoon. My niece has severe autism, and I've read quite a few biographies, mostly from parents. I started [book:In a Different Key: The Story of Autism|..."

HI Charlie and welcome! I hope you like the book as much as I did! I guess I would recommend not reading our comments and especially our spoiler comments ( comments behind the spoilers) until you are at the same spot in your book as we were. Beth and I both finished but I will definitely come back and chat with you about the book! Yeah I am excited you are jumping head first into your first buddy read. My first buddy read was two autumns ago for Tower Teams. Happy reading:-)


message 16: by Beth (new) - rated it 4 stars

Beth | 1601 comments It's a very short book -- I think at message 5 Laura was done and I caught up at 11 :-)

I really like reading books written by autistic authors; it gives real insight into their perceptions.

My son has Asperger's so I'm also personally interested in this stuff, but I also volunteer with children with special needs.


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