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Feminism Is for Everybody: Passionate Politics
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message 1: by Nanania (new) - added it

Nanania Wangare | 50 comments Mod
“Simply put, feminism is a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression...I liked this definition because it did not imply that men were the enemy. By naming sexism as the problem it went directly to the heart of the matter. Practically, it is a definition which implies that all sexist thinking and action is the problem, whether those who perpetuate it are female or male, child or adult. It is also broad enough to include an understanding of systemic institutionalized sexism. As a definition it is open-ended. To understand feminism it implies one has to necessarily understand sexism.”


message 2: by Samira (new) - added it

Samira Ali (smirgolbaggins) I want us to also discuss the point of gender equality. How we say "to be equal to men" are we using them as the standard? do we really want us to be equal to them? or do we Want equal access to power? should we be clarifying our points? anyway, I'm hoping this book touches on that :) so far so good


message 3: by Nanania (new) - added it

Nanania Wangare | 50 comments Mod
Samira wrote: "I want us to also discuss the point of gender equality. How we say "to be equal to men" are we using them as the standard? do we really want us to be equal to them? or do we Want equal access to po..."

I wonder about this too because equality takes the male status quo as the standard to which women aspire.
Also making two things equal on some spectrum doesn't always achieve equality in a greater sense and other philosophies that keep me up at night.

I want equal access to power and opportunities tbh.


message 4: by Nanania (new) - added it

Nanania Wangare | 50 comments Mod
Also I found this long mind-blowing academic resource that solved most of my problems with definition.
You guys should read it, if you haven't already and if you have,read it again :)

Excerpt;
"What would count as (full) justice for women? What is the nature of the wrong that feminism seeks to address? E.g., is the wrong that women have been deprived equal rights? Is it that women have been denied equal respect for their differences? Is it that women's experiences have been ignored and devalued? Is it all of the above and more? What framework should we employ to identify and address the issues?"

For this and more read The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Topics in Feminism.
http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/fem...


message 5: by Nanania (last edited Jul 21, 2016 04:51AM) (new) - added it

Nanania Wangare | 50 comments Mod
In the introduction, when she says,

"There should be so many little feminist primers, easy to read pamphlets and books, telling us all about feminism, that this book would be just another passionate voice speaking out on behalf of feminist politics. There should be billboards; ads in magazines; ads on buses, subways, trains; television commercials spreading the word, letting the world know more about feminism."

What do you think about this?
Is it possible to make it a reality in Kenya, or Africa at large?
Do we have pamphlets, billboards, ads...?
How can we solve the problem of the patriarchal mass media that results in the misunderstandings of feminism?


message 6: by Mwende (new)

Mwende Ngao | 1 comments Getting into reading this and I have to say there are some pretty interesting ideas.
I've thought about how do we disseminate information on feminism as proponents of patriarchy are using various channels to disseminate their messages. Though to be honest, I am turned off by the evangelical approach she proposes. Could be counterintuitive.
There are elements of it that could be up for debate but I think the use of pop culture is seemingly effective.
What I am wrestling with is the accommodative nature of reaching out to people. I find I'm becoming more militant and simply less patient than I initially was with opponents of feminism. How to strike the balance (If a balance should be struck at all) between taking time to reach out and reserving precious energy and time to do the work.


message 7: by Nanania (new) - added it

Nanania Wangare | 50 comments Mod
Mwende wrote: " Though to be honest, I am turned off by the evangelical approach she proposes. Could be counter intuitive..."

I completely get what you mean by this.
Feminism is for everybody but is everybody for feminism?
Consequently, should we be 'reaching out' to everybody?
It can be exhausting trying to convert opponents of feminism and I honestly don't see the point.
However, I think it is necessary, for a mass based political movement to be able to reach out to people(those who don't know, those whose minds are not yet made up).
Maybe as feminism preaches the message of unlearning and relearning, we should compliment it with teaching/ consciousness raising for the younger generation.


message 8: by Nanania (new) - added it

Nanania Wangare | 50 comments Mod
Also, as for pop-culture and feminism, the 'Spice girls feminist remake' music video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZQ2R...
#whatireallyreallywant for the sustainable development goals is a good example.


message 9: by Nkatha (last edited Aug 01, 2016 01:47AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Nkatha | 1 comments Nanania wrote: "In the introduction, when she says,

"There should be so many little feminist primers, easy to read pamphlets and books, telling us all about feminism, that this book would be just another passiona..."


I've just finished reading this book and the whole time I kept thinking how amazing it would be to have a book (pamphlet or not) specifically documenting the evolution of the feminist movement in Kenya .Does anyone know whether this exists? Or is there any resource anyone can point me to?


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