RDG 6346 Summer II, 2016 discussion

11 views
When My Name Was Keoko

Comments Showing 1-24 of 24 (24 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (drld) | 17 comments Mod
Japan owned Korea and Keoko is proud to be Korean and her heritage.


message 2: by Nickole (new)

Nickole Castillo | 48 comments I found this book hard to read. I liked the message and the inspiration that this story can bring to students, however I don't think I will have this book in my classroom library. Keoko was loyal, patriotic, and determined to represent Korea and her heritage. I would have students compare Korea and the United States using a double bubble map. Students can compare a time in history when the United States was owned by Britain against a time when Japan owned Korea.

-Nickole Castillo


message 3: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Thornton | 45 comments Not going to lie, I listened to this book instead of reading it. It was read in different voices for the two perspectives, which made it engaging for me. What do you all think about having the students listen to the book on tape and following along in their own copy?

I love that the author writes this novel in different perspectives. I think this makes it engaging for both male and female readers. I was really interested in this book because I never thought about the Koreans who had to fight for Japan. I never thought about what they went through when Japan took over Korea. I was so happy when Tae-yul showed up at the house. I had a feeling that he was still alive but was not sure. I also love how the kids learn that their father was just as courageous as their uncle. I love that they learn to respect the type of man he is. This book would go with many of the other historical fiction books. You could do a whole unit over World War II and students could have different novel studies using these books to see what was going on in different parts of the world.


message 4: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Garcia-Dominguez | 45 comments The author tells a sensitive and intense story from two viewpoints, both in first person, of a brother and a sister. The depth of understanding that the characters acquire becomes our own, and inadvertently reminds us of the price and value of freedom.
Social Studies lesson- students can identify North and South Korea, Manchuria, and Japan on a world map or globe to familiarize themselves with the setting of the story. They can compare the Korean flag with the Japanese flag. They can explore both cultures and locations.


message 5: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Garcia-Dominguez | 45 comments Nickole wrote: I would have students compare Korea and the United States using a double bubble map.

Great idea! You can also compare Japan and Korea.



message 6: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Garcia-Dominguez | 45 comments Victoria wrote: It was read in different voices for the two perspectives, which made it engaging for me. What do you all think about having the students listen to the book on tape and following along in their own copy?

I'm on board with having them listen to the book on tape. A different way of reading their book. They would probably understand both perspective better.



message 7: by Ashley (new)

Ashley Ram Gosnell | 48 comments I love this work for geography, WW2, and cultural lessons. I really enjoyed having two shifting perspectives. It is wonderful to see the differences of a female/male, as well as, the age differences. This would pair very well with a story told by a North Korean girl near the same timeframe, Year of Impossible Goodbyes. It is so sad to learn about kids being used as weapons. I would incorporate a reader response asking what they would bury and where.


message 8: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Skiles | 35 comments If you like historical fiction books this one is perfect for you. This is not my favorite gene, so it was hard for me really get into. I think this may be a little hard for young readers to follow because of the flip-flop narration between the brother and sister. Even though it was a difficult read for me, it was a beautiful story about family, friends, and hope.

I would use this a Social Studies lesson over Korea. Students would learn about the culture and history of Korea. To spice it up a little, I would through a math lesson in there as well. Students would learn about the Korean cuisine and then have them do a cookbook. This could be used with fractions. They would adjust the amount of ingredients needed, either up or down. Example: If the original recipe called for ½ of a particular ingredient and that makes 4 servings…how would they adjust if they needed to make 6 servings. Or, increase all of the ingredients needed by 1/3.


message 9: by Ashley (new)

Ashley Ram Gosnell | 48 comments Stephanie wrote: "If you like historical fiction books this one is perfect for you. This is not my favorite gene, so it was hard for me really get into. I think this may be a little hard for young readers to follow ..."

Love using cuisines as an interaction-cultural opportunity! Great idea about the math tie-in!!


message 10: by Ashley (new)

Ashley Ram Gosnell | 48 comments Nickole wrote: "I found this book hard to read. I liked the message and the inspiration that this story can bring to students, however I don't think I will have this book in my classroom library. Keoko was loyal, ..."

What a great idea to compare across cultures and spanning time!


message 11: by Ariel (new)

Ariel Peaks | 38 comments I actually enjoyed this book. I like the Korean words that were in this book. I didn't think this book was going to be interesting, but I was very surprised. I will have my students research WW2 and Korea. The students could make a poster, a power point or anything else that they would like. I would also allow the students to research a famous person from Korea. Then the students would come together and share as a class.

Ashley I agree this book would be great for a geography unit and Victoria I wish I would have thought of listening to this book.


message 12: by Tanner (new)

Tanner Pruitt | 47 comments I couldn't really get into this book. Historical fiction just really isn't my thing. However, these past few books over this time period would be great to have on hand to give students choice in certain activities or for research purposes.

I really liked the thought of a book banquet for this one because food is mentioned quite a bit and so you announce at the beginning of the book that you will be doing a book banquet instead of a traditional book report and (depending on hat kind of economic area you're in) the students can each bring something from the book or the teacher can just pick out a few easy things and you use the opportunity to eat and freely talk about the book. They do have to fill out a paper with little points that they want to cover to turn in but it's fun and not as formal and nerve racking as a book report.


message 13: by Tanner (new)

Tanner Pruitt | 47 comments Stephanie wrote: "If you like historical fiction books this one is perfect for you. This is not my favorite gene, so it was hard for me really get into. I think this may be a little hard for young readers to follow ..."


I always forget about math. Math is pretty much in everything we do. Great idea!


message 14: by Tanner (new)

Tanner Pruitt | 47 comments Ariel wrote: "I actually enjoyed this book. I like the Korean words that were in this book. I didn't think this book was going to be interesting, but I was very surprised. I will have my students research WW2 an..."

I love when students can choose alternatives to a traditional book report. Novel posters and powerpoints are great examples!


message 15: by Marion (new)

Marion Oliver | 33 comments I did not like this book.


message 16: by Nickole (new)

Nickole Castillo | 48 comments Victoria wrote: "Not going to lie, I listened to this book instead of reading it. It was read in different voices for the two perspectives, which made it engaging for me. What do you all think about having the stud..."

Victoria,
I didn't know you could listen to this book. I think it's a great idea and would make the story better with voices to match the characters. I will look for the audio version of this book, thanks for the idea!
-Nickole


message 17: by Nickole (new)

Nickole Castillo | 48 comments Ariel wrote: "I actually enjoyed this book. I like the Korean words that were in this book. I didn't think this book was going to be interesting, but I was very surprised. I will have my students research WW2 an..."
Ariel,
I like your idea. I actually looked up some facts about Korea and WW2 after reading this book. I think students would like researching more facts based on this book.

-Nickole


message 18: by Ixtchel (new)

Ixtchel Olalde | 44 comments Victoria wrote: "Not going to lie, I listened to this book instead of reading it. It was read in different voices for the two perspectives, which made it engaging for me. What do you all think about having the stud..."

I think books on tape is an awesome idea...it offers a choice of how to interact with literature...especially when it is read in different voices which helps you to experience the characters more and enjoy the reading more...also you never know when a student will need to have something read to them through an accommodation or just the need for listening practice...


message 19: by Ixtchel (new)

Ixtchel Olalde | 44 comments This was a very interesting read for me....having the perspective of two characters did take some time to get straight in my head but perhaps it would be good to buddy students up and have them read through with the characters that way they are able to listen to both and experience both a little better...overall the story is a powerful one...it is hard again to think that these kinds of things happen in the world to children of all people....we sometimes focus on certain areas only during the WWII era that we forget about the many other untold stories of other places....


message 20: by Ixtchel (new)

Ixtchel Olalde | 44 comments Tanner wrote: "I couldn't really get into this book. Historical fiction just really isn't my thing. However, these past few books over this time period would be great to have on hand to give students choice in ce..."

Historical fiction is something hard for many students to understand and rap their brain around what is going on...but also making it interesting for them and getting them to share their opinions although these things happened in the past...


message 21: by Ami (new)

Ami Winkelbauer | 23 comments This was a hard read for me. I understand that the author added Korean and Japanese words to get a feel for the culture but this was a little confusing. It was interesting to read the different view points between the brother and sister. They both had the same fears and confusion of being forced into the Japanese culture. It was also interesting to see this family's point of view during WW2.

In the classroom I would focus on the cultural aspect of the novel. Students could write about the fact that the characters were forced to take on a Japanese names, language, style of clothing, and even the type of trees. For a Geography lessons, students could identify these countries on a map. The book discussed how Japan took over several countries. Students can keep an ongoing map and indicate these countries as they read.


message 22: by Ami (new)

Ami Winkelbauer | 23 comments Ixtchel wrote: "This was a very interesting read for me....having the perspective of two characters did take some time to get straight in my head but perhaps it would be good to buddy students up and have them rea..."

Great idea on having students read in partners. This would definitely help students identify with the changing POV.


message 23: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Thornton | 45 comments Joanne wrote: "The author tells a sensitive and intense story from two viewpoints, both in first person, of a brother and a sister. The depth of understanding that the characters acquire becomes our own, and inad..."

I like this idea to learn about the cultures of both places. I agree that I felt a personal connection with the characters.


message 24: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Thornton | 45 comments Ixtchel wrote: "This was a very interesting read for me....having the perspective of two characters did take some time to get straight in my head but perhaps it would be good to buddy students up and have them rea..."

Great idea to have students buddy read. I think that would be fun for them and like you said easier to keep characters straight.


back to top