RDG 6346 Summer II, 2016 discussion

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Weedflower

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message 1: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (drld) | 17 comments Mod
What happened to the Japanese-Americans living in America during WWII? Read to find out!


message 2: by Nickole (new)

Nickole Castillo | 48 comments Weedflower is a story about the challenges of friendship between two racial divides. Sumiko's family is a victim of racial prejudice. After the bombing at Pearl Harbor the Americans believe that all Japanese people are spies for the emperor. This book was interesting, sad, and hopeful. The friendship between Sumiko and the young Mohave boy is challenging at first, but they become good friends despite their race. I think this book is good for students to read. I would use this book to have a discussion on racial prejudices and stereotypes. As a class we would discuss whether these stereotypes have changed or not. This book is more for upper elementary or middle school students.

-Nickole Castillo


message 3: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Thornton | 45 comments This book started off kind of slow for me but when it picked up I enjoyed it. I cried when she was disinvited to the party because that was so sad. It was interesting to see how Sumiko’s attitude changed and the emotions she experienced through the different changes that occurred. Through her friendship with Frank I think she was able to see that Native Americans were more like them than they realized. I don’t remember learning about Japanese Americans during WWII in school but this book really opened my eyes to think about the war from their perspective and the Native American’s perspective. Her aunt and many of the other families were courageous to leave the camp knowing that they might face such hate from others while her own sons were fighting in the same war. Great book to aid to conversations or projects about how different races were affected by the war. Some powerful and thought provoking conversations could come from this book.


message 4: by Ashley (new)

Ashley Ram Gosnell | 48 comments Another terribly sad story, made even more real since it was here. Love that this perspective from WW2 is also intertwined with a bit of the Native American’s struggle as well. I love hearing George Takei describe his experience, and it would be great to research others that also tell their story. For older students, you could discuss how this is relevant in today’s society around the world. Additionally, this author’s other books look great and could be a gateway.

http://io9.gizmodo.com/george-takei-d...


message 5: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Skiles | 35 comments Weedflower
Again, historical fiction…not my thing, but I absolutely loved loved loved this book. This turned out to be such a great story of an amazing young girl and her journey through war. I loved how the author was able to draw me into the story through the characters. I will definitely have this book in my classroom library.
There is a website that I really like to use, it is called Glogster. Look it up…it is super neat!! I like to use this an alternative to a book report. I think I would use this and allow students to put together a book report using Glogster.


message 6: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Garcia-Dominguez | 45 comments I enjoyed the book. It was sad when Sumiko is excited to be invited to her first birthday party. When the parents at the party learn that she's Japanese, they quietly ask her to leave. Students can have a discussion and write a paper about what they think racial and ethnic profiling means.


message 7: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Garcia-Dominguez | 45 comments Stephanie wrote: There is a website that I really like to use, it is called Glogster. Look it up…it is super neat!! I like to use this an alternative to a book report. I think I would use this and allow students to put together a book report using Glogster.

I will definitely check out the website Glogster. Thank you!



message 8: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Garcia-Dominguez | 45 comments Victoria wrote: I don’t remember learning about Japanese Americans during WWII in school but this book really opened my eyes to think about the war from their perspective and the Native American’s perspective.

I don't remember either. This book was very informative!



message 9: by Ashley (new)

Ashley Ram Gosnell | 48 comments Stephanie wrote: "Weedflower
Again, historical fiction…not my thing, but I absolutely loved loved loved this book. This turned out to be such a great story of an amazing young girl and her journey through war. I lov..."


Wow--- Glogster is awesome-- thanks for the great find! I definitely see Christopher utilizing this site in the next year. Wonderful format to add to my " alternative book report ideas" list!


message 10: by Ashley (new)

Ashley Ram Gosnell | 48 comments Joanne wrote: "I enjoyed the book. It was sad when Sumiko is excited to be invited to her first birthday party. When the parents at the party learn that she's Japanese, they quietly ask her to leave. Students can..."

Great idea Joanne to write about racial/ethnic profiling-- this would really get them thinking about how silly it really is since it is a little girl at a birthday party. :(


message 11: by Tanner (new)

Tanner Pruitt | 47 comments I think this book gives great opportunity to compare and contrast society from then to now. With all the issues of race and stereotyping, I feel like it could really open some eyes about perspectives and maybe how not to judge a book by it's cover


message 12: by Tanner (new)

Tanner Pruitt | 47 comments Stephanie wrote: "Weedflower
Again, historical fiction…not my thing, but I absolutely loved loved loved this book. This turned out to be such a great story of an amazing young girl and her journey through war. I lov..."


You and gloster! I've still never used it but I sure plan to


message 13: by Tanner (new)

Tanner Pruitt | 47 comments Victoria wrote: "This book started off kind of slow for me but when it picked up I enjoyed it. I cried when she was disinvited to the party because that was so sad. It was interesting to see how Sumiko’s attitude c..."

I don't remember much from WWII units. I just really liked seeing it through other perspectives in these past few books. I feel like it gives a more well rounded view of it


message 14: by Nickole (new)

Nickole Castillo | 48 comments Victoria wrote: "This book started off kind of slow for me but when it picked up I enjoyed it. I cried when she was disinvited to the party because that was so sad. It was interesting to see how Sumiko’s attitude c..."

Victoria,
I found it sad when she wasn't invited to the party as well. I agree with you, I don't remember learning about Japanese Americans during WWII, but it is a good book for our students to read.

-Nickole


message 15: by Nickole (new)

Nickole Castillo | 48 comments Joanne wrote: "I enjoyed the book. It was sad when Sumiko is excited to be invited to her first birthday party. When the parents at the party learn that she's Japanese, they quietly ask her to leave. Students can..."

Joanne,
Great idea to use with your students! I think this could lead to great discussions about race and discrimination.

-Nickole


message 16: by Marion (new)

Marion Oliver | 33 comments With this book I would definitely utilize compare and contrast. With my students we would discuss todays situations and compare them to the situations in this book. I'm sure we would have an open discussion about racial prejudice and friendship.

Victoria I like what you said how this is a great book to aid conversations or projects about different races were affected by war.
Joanne; good idea to have students write a paper about what they think racial and ethnic profiling means.


message 17: by Ami (new)

Ami Winkelbauer | 23 comments I really enjoyed this book! It was such a touching story of friendship and going against racial prejudices. I really love the family unit and bond that the characters held onto throughout the story, especially Sumiko and her little brother. Apparently, I don't handle good-byes very well because I was moved to tears when Sumiko had to say bye to Frank.

In the classroom, I would compare and contrast the lives of the family in this book to the experiences in Shades of Gray. Students can explore how these two groups had completely different experiences based on their race and culture. Students could also write letters to Frank, Uncle, Jiichan and Ichiro and explain Sumiko's new life in Chicago.


message 18: by Ariel (new)

Ariel Peaks | 38 comments This book was very interesting and informative. I didn't know a lot do the information that was talked about in this book. The activity I would have my students complete is comparing what is happening with racism in today's society and what happened in this book. I like your activities Ashely and Stephanie.


message 19: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Thornton | 45 comments Ashley wrote: "Another terribly sad story, made even more real since it was here. Love that this perspective from WW2 is also intertwined with a bit of the Native American’s struggle as well. I love hearing Georg..."

Really interesting interview thanks for sharing! I agree, this story definitely seemed more real because it was here.


message 20: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Thornton | 45 comments Tanner wrote: "Victoria wrote: "This book started off kind of slow for me but when it picked up I enjoyed it. I cried when she was disinvited to the party because that was so sad. It was interesting to see how Su..."

I agree I also feel more well rounded about this subject because of these books.


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