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Never Cry Wolf: The Amazing True Story of Life Among Arctic Wolves
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Book Clubs - general/business > Never Cry Wolf by Farley Mowat

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SamZ (samwisezbrown) This is the story of one man's journey in the Canadian wilderness to observe and learn more about the wolf and to (hopefully) de-villianize the animals.
*There is some controversy about whether Mowat fictionalized some of his experiences. I don't know for sure, but it was certainly meant to be truthful. Someone online compared it to James Herriot's recollections of life as a country vet: mostly true with a little bit of color thrown in.


Tracey (traceyrb) Sam wrote: "This is the story of one man's journey in the Canadian wilderness to observe and learn more about the wolf and to (hopefully) de-villianize the animals.
*There is some controversy about whether Mow..."

Sam, I have heard the same but Mowat studied the Canadian wild life all his life and it is possible he added some of his other experiences to this story. I believe it will be an overall honest rendition. I will be reading it and leading this discussion and will post here my thoughts.


Tracey (traceyrb) Chapter 1-8. I have got so far in the book. The first few chapters were not that good and Farley admits in the introduction that he was originally writing a book about the 'silliness' of bureaucracy but then it became a book advocating the rights and safety of the wolves. In chapter 8, after having met with both adult wolves and their den, and four pups, and in which they had made no attempt to attack him never mind eat him, he says:
'the most blood thirsty animals in the Artic are not wolves, but the insatiable mosquitoes.'


Tracey (traceyrb) My review of the book:

To celebrate Canada Day I decided to read in July a book by a Canadian author, and chose this book.

In the early 1950's Farley Mowat, a then young man undecided on his career, was sent by the Dominion Wildlife Service to study the wolves in the Barren Lands of Canada's northern regions. The caribou population was declining and the study was to determine that the wolf was a menace to man and beast. He spent 2 summers and 1 winter living near a Timberwolf group, the largest species of wolf. The group, consisted of 2 adult males (George and Uncle Albert), 1 female (Angeline) and 2 pups, and the evidence he brought back showed that rather than a menace, the wolf is an important part of the eco system and a creature of great intelligence which lives in a social/family order and harmony with nature.

The book's beginning is somewhat less interesting as Mowat was originally intending to show the ridiculousness and nonsense at times of bureaucracy. The book picks up at about chapter 5 and most of Mowat's days from then on are spent observing the wolves and coming to love them. At one point he states that 'the most bloodthirsty animals in the Artic are not the wolves, but the mosquitoes.'

These graceful intelligent creatures he determined had an incredible range of vocal sounds and communication system amongst themselves and over distances to other packs.
Man was the reason the caribou were declining, and the enemy of much of nature, not the wolf.

This may not be the best book written in defence of these beautiful creatures but is one of the first and is worthy of a place in any library and being read at least once.


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