The F-word discussion

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TALKING POINTS > Teen Feminism!

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LilyCat (Agent of SHIELD)-- on hiatus :( (lilycat_reads) | 19 comments Hey guys, what issues do you think are the most important for teenage girls and teenage feminists to address?


message 2: by Moni (new)

Moni (macaroon-dream) | 32 comments Slut shaming and self objectification. It's confusing to me but when was a teen a big thing was calling other girls sluts for dressing too sexy and getting many boyfriends, while simultaneously looking at ourselves through the male gaze to see if we were sexy enough. I don't know if teens are still feeling it.


LilyCat (Agent of SHIELD)-- on hiatus :( (lilycat_reads) | 19 comments I think victim blaming is a big problem. In my opinion, rape is rape. However, it's more convenient to shame a victim for what they were wearing or doing at the time instead of telling the perpetrator that what they did was awful.

Also, teen pregnancy is an issue. In this country, it's just hard for people to have a meaningful discussion about sex with their children and give them a healthy outlook on relationships. In more conservative parts of the country, people say, "don't give them sex ed or birth control, it'll make them do it more!" but plenty of teens are still getting pregnant there or even getting STD's because people make it into a talking point about morals instead of addressing real girls being harmed.


LilyCat (Agent of SHIELD)-- on hiatus :( (lilycat_reads) | 19 comments What are your opinions on modesty? Is it a feminism issue or not?


message 5: by Amanda (new)

Amanda | 1 comments I think modesty is a tricky one, because many standards of modesty are based off of fear of the female body - dress codes are often focused on what women can't wear because they'll "distract" the men around them. In this case, enforced modesty is akin to slut shaming. That said, I don't think there is anything wrong with women (or men) who wish to dress modestly - I grew up in a Catholic household and have friends who practice Islam. Both of these religions encourage modest dress and I have been fortunate enough to have friends and family who do not require a certain level of modesty or tell me I'm improper if I don't dress a certain way. I think it's having the choice that matters. There isn't a right or wrong choice. I think modesty becomes an issue when its used a vehicle for control - when its forced upon someone. So long as the choice is available I don't think it's an "issue" either way. Although I guess that goes for most feminist issues right? It's all about availability of choices.


message 6: by Moni (new)

Moni (macaroon-dream) | 32 comments In my state we have one of the most teen pregnancies in the country. A big reason why I think is because we have abstinence only education (which makes no sense and multiple studies show that it has no effect on teen pregnancy rates). I went to school out of the state and we got a better sex Ed and that actually did more for me than saying "don't have sex" because safe sex is expensive.


LilyCat (Agent of SHIELD)-- on hiatus :( (lilycat_reads) | 19 comments Amanda wrote: "I think modesty is a tricky one, because many standards of modesty are based off of fear of the female body - dress codes are often focused on what women can't wear because they'll "distract" the m..."

Why don't they have modesty standards for men b/c some women would totally be like "OMG :DDD" at the sight of a man's buff, muscled chest? There seems to be an attitude that only men suffer from (sinful) lust and women don't, making women constantly in danger of "tripping up" a lustful man with immodesty. If a woman starts lusting after a man for him showing skin, it's her problem, but if a man starts lusting after a woman for her showing skin, it's also her problem.

I guess people immediately associate a woman showing off skin as overtly sexual, while a man taking off his shirt is just... being a man? Sweating? Why can't women show off their great abs?


message 8: by LilyCat (Agent of SHIELD)-- on hiatus :( (last edited Jul 06, 2016 12:11PM) (new)

LilyCat (Agent of SHIELD)-- on hiatus :( (lilycat_reads) | 19 comments Moni wrote: "Slut shaming and self objectification. It's confusing to me but when was a teen a big thing was calling other girls sluts for dressing too sexy and getting many boyfriends, while simultaneously loo..."

I think it's because as teenagers, everyone is insecure, and calling someone a "slut" is a society- provided weapon to get out jealousy at another girl's body or relationships. We may feel envious that another girl's body is more mature or that she's already had a few boyfriends, so we say mean things about her to tear her down and make us feel better about ourselves, or "punish" her for being sexier than us.

In addition, society sends a very mixed signal about sex. The authorities are like, "don't have sex! You'll die!" Meanwhile, "rebellious teen culture" says, "just have sex whenever you want, screw birth control/condoms/etc. PARTY!!!" So slut shame is a 2-sided coin. We may shame a girl for having sex, while we also want to be in her place, since society says that we are valuable based on how sexy we are.

We only feel this jealousy because women are constantly given a value in society based on their bodies (and their value to their partners). If another girl is thinner or she has bigger breasts, we're jealous of her because we see her as more "valuable" than ourselves. So EVERYONE IS BEAUTIFUL!! END SHAME NOW!


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