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message 1: by Chris (new)

Chris Jags | 16 comments I'm currently working on a novel from a first person perspective. However the prologue would necessarily have to be from a third person perspective, as the protagonist would not be there at the time.

So the question is: would this switch seem jarring to readers? I'm keeping the prologue no matter what; it's critical. I'd rather re-write what I have entirely in third person than lose the prologue.

Thoughts? Thanks!


message 2: by Joy (new)

Joy Valentine (joyvalentinebooks) | 9 comments I think that would only add to the book itself for the readers as long as it is clear who is speaking in the prologue. Sounds like a clever idea actually


message 3: by Joanie (new)

Joanie Pariera (joaniepariera) | 7 comments Yes. I agree . I've used this and people who read it liked it.


message 4: by Lenita (new)

Lenita Sheridan | 104 comments As long as you keep changes in points of view in separate chapters it should work.


message 5: by Jan (new)

Jan Notzon | 221 comments Funny, the novel I'm working on now has that very change. I'm also pretty committed to a second 1st person narration for the second part of the book. But I'm nervous about it. Cormac McCarthy goes one better in The Orchard Keeper with a prologue that doesn't seem remotely connected to the story.
I recently read "The Watch" written in various 1st person accounts and I thought it was extraordinary.


message 6: by Jan (new)

Jan Notzon | 221 comments Anyway, all that's to say I think it could work just fine.


message 7: by Chris (new)

Chris Jags | 16 comments Thanks, I appreciate all the feedback! I'm going to go ahead as planned, then.


message 8: by Will (new)

Will Once (willonce) | 210 comments I suppose I'm honour-bound to trot out the usual advice. Standard stuff, cut to fit or ignore as you wish,

Prologues are a hot topic amongst writers. Some hate them, some love them. I've never seen a prologue that absolutely had to be there. The same story told by a prologue-hater would have been prologue-less. But if you know the risks (and why many authors don't like prologues) then feel free to prologue away. All I would say is that it's probably best to keep it short.

Switching perspectives is also a hot topic. It's one of those things that writers like to do a lot when they are starting out because it feels clever and edgy. But it can very easily be overdone or badly done. The reader can feel confused if there is too much perspective-hopping.

Having said that, two perspectives (third for the prologue and first for the rest of the book) seems fine. It will depend on how well you write it, of course, but that holds true for just about everything.

My slight worry is when you say that the prologue has to be in third person perspective and you have to have a prologue. In writing there are very few things that "have to" be done a certain way. We generally have more choices than we think.

Fr' instance, your prologue which has to be written in third person because your narrator isn't there could be written in first person simply by choosing another narrator. Or insert it into the main novel in a flashback. Or insert it into the main novel as exposition. Or have a character explain it to the main character. Or not explain it and leave it to the reader's imagination.


message 9: by Chris (last edited Jul 04, 2016 07:31AM) (new)

Chris Jags | 16 comments I'd prefer not to choose another narrator, because I feel that two first person perspectives might be more disorienting than switching from third to first. I'd also prefer to commit to the first person narrative once it engages and not change perspective midway. Exposition is, IMO, dull and distancing, as is having something explained which could instead be shown.

So while it is fair to say that I don't "have to" have a prologue, I feel that removing it would cripple the foundation of what I am going to be trying for. I understand having it there may be divisive, but I feel it's important... and I'm not concerned about pleasing everyone as I don't tend to write in (sub)genres that interest many people anyway.

I don't feel like I'm trying to be 'clever' or 'edgy'. As I said, if the perspective switch truly doesn't work, I'd be prepared to change my entire post-prologue body of work into a third person perspective to match the prologue if need be (in that scenario I'd also be more prepared to cut the prologue and include a flashback sequence later on, although I worry - as it would only be one chapter - that it would feel more like an 'intermission' and disrupt the flow of the story).

I appreciate your input, which got my gears turning a little more than they probably were, and will give it due consideration. I will certainly keep the prologue short and hopefully painless.


message 10: by Eric (new)

Eric Westfall (eawestfall) | 183 comments Chris,

For what it's worth, virtually everything I write is in first person, and since I write MM romance (mostly fantasy and historical) that means the tale is told by my two leading men in 1st person, in mostly alternating chapters. Occasionally one of my guys will need to narrate a couple of chapters in a row, because that's what the story needs. (Oh, and one done, one in progress involve three main characters.)

I have absolutely no idea what current theories are about the "best" way to write a novel in terms of POV, or what's in vogue, or what's clever or edgy (to crib from Will), as I don't research writing theories, or read "how-to" books. To go all Rhett on you all: "Frankly, my dear(s) [no offense intended], I don't give a damn."

Digression: I do find Will's contributions to various writing topics very educational, though! *s*

I write for me, and tell my stories in the way my guys want their stories told. (And no, I didn't sit down with Peregrine, Rory and Michel and discuss points of view possibilities, before letting them each contribute to the total tale.)

As for prologues, I use them when the story requires it. I have a series of historical novels in progress, 3 Regency (1 done), 1 Victorian (done), plus one contemporary, set in "Another England." I'm using the same prologue for each one to set the stage for why this is "another" England. Readers who've read one book can skip the prologue, but for new readers it's some necessary background.

I'm currently working on what'll probably be a novella in the 25K range. I got about 15K in, and while I know the guys are gonna get their HEA, I realized I'd written myself to a standstill. The way I'd written it (it's a fantasy, by the way), MC1 was a cop/investigator, and the story required some sort of crime as the reason for him being in the particular place at the particular time when he meets MC2.

The problem: While I love mysteries, and procedurals, I haven't the foggiest notion how to write one; my mind just doesn't work that way.

So I was stuck. Until suddenly I had an alternative explanation for his presence "there"...but it needed a prologue to set it up.

I wrote it in third person, though from MC1's POV, got 2/3 through and realized it would work better in 1st person, again MC1's POV, but without identifying him.

I'm about done with it...but (sorry, folks) this ain't a "short" prologue. It's about 2800 words. It establishes a legitimate reason for MC1 being where he is at the start of the story, even though at the end of the prologue he's only just figured out the "where." It also pretty much sets up the universe in which this happens, but without (hopefully) formal exposition, but instead through what's happening to MC1.

So, my personal theory is that you write what feels right for you and the story you're telling. Of course you have to follow some of the rules/most of the rules about grammar and stuff like that there, but you can adapt/modify/bend if your story needs it. Thus, Chris, I suggest you don't write a "short" prologue. I suggest you write the prologue your story needs...yes, Will, I understand *teasing smile*...and if it's short, so be it. If it ain't, it ain't.

Just my USD .02.

Eric-the-ever-offering-penny-thoughts


message 11: by Chris (last edited Jul 04, 2016 07:34AM) (new)

Chris Jags | 16 comments Eric wrote: "So, my personal theory is that you write what feels right for you and the story you're telling. Of course you have to follow some of the rules/most of the rules about grammar and stuff like that there, but you can adapt/modify/bend if your story needs it. Thus, Chris, I suggest you don't write a "short" prologue. I suggest you write the prologue your story needs..."

My story only needs a short prologue. Without it, though, I truly feel like the whole tale would be less impactful. It really would be my best opportunity to give voice to something that would just seem awkwardly shoe-horned in if I add it later.

I do tend to write what I instinctively feel is "right" (quote-unquote, I know I don't always nail it), and I believe I will in this case as well. I think I've made the right choice. I'm glad to get some different perspectives, though, because I find it's easy to get tunnel-vision when it's your own project (and mistake it for determination).

Thanks for the advice and good luck with the novella!


message 12: by Edna (new)

Edna Bell-Pearson | 5 comments I don't know if we're talking about the same thing here but, I like to use Ernest Hemingway's format for "In Our Time" for books in which I have something else to say. For example, "Fragile Hopes, Transient Dreams" starts off each story with thoughts from Eva, written in the third person. "17½ Big Steps," on the other hand, leads off with a first person related viewpoint.


message 13: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Goerl | 137 comments No. It's perfectly acceptable to change viewpoints from chapter to chapter in a novel.


message 14: by Sally (new)

Sally (brasscastle) | 261 comments Agreed that changing POVs from chapter to chapter is no problem - not in the least bit uncommon. Even within a chapter, doing so between paragraphs or sections within a chapter is acceptable if it is well attributed so as not to lose the reader. This is my current challenge in Novel #2, blending the POVs of the two main characters, who are psychically linked, and as their life paths travel closer and closer, ultimately merging into one path, their POVs become more closely linked. This is very tricky for me, and I am still working on it. I want it to work, and I think it can, but it is taking some very careful writing. I'm getting important feedback from my beta readers on this. (Hooray for beta readers!)


message 15: by Delores (new)

Delores Cremm | 20 comments I'm not sure if this is relevant to this group discussion but I am working on a novel that has very poor english and writing it has been a challenge. My character's dialogue for example would say dat instead of that and what fer instead of what for. My question is how could one edit such poor english. The story is written in the first person with narratives. Should I narrate proper english and do dialogue in the backward phrases or should I keep it consistent with the backward english


message 16: by Jan (new)

Jan Notzon | 221 comments Hmm. Interesting dilemma. Obviously there are many examples of writing in dialect. My initial impression is that if the reader can make sense of it, keeping the feel of the narrator is important.


message 17: by Delores (new)

Delores Cremm | 20 comments Would Alice Walker's The Color Purple be an example? I'm asking this because my novel is situated in the early 1960s and African American southern dialect.


message 18: by Sara (new)

Sara Caudell (saracaudell) | 19 comments if you are using Word spell check you can add to the vocabulary.

When you check the spelling, there is an 'ADD' button .


message 19: by Delores (new)

Delores Cremm | 20 comments My mentor suggested to drop the g in certain words such as fixing which turns into fixin this can train the readers eyes and distinguish dialect at the same time. I've added to my word vocabulary. My problem was words like that pronounced as dat. The phonetics is difficult because on paper it appears to be a great deal of gibberish and distracting to the reader. I need suggestions on fixing this. Should I use proper english at some point to clean it up or go on and write true to my characters?


message 20: by Sara (new)

Sara Caudell (saracaudell) | 19 comments You might want to put fixin' this way every time the reader see the apostrophe he knows there is a letter missing.

As long as you only use this in dialog only you can easily get away with it. Have you ever read Home From the Hills? Very old book.

You have to make the book 'real' and this dialog helps define the characters.


message 21: by Sara (new)

Sara Caudell (saracaudell) | 19 comments I don't think there is a problem with the word dat as long as it is in with "You no fixin' dat, are ya?" Readers can handle it.


message 22: by Delores (new)

Delores Cremm | 20 comments Sarah what wonderful suggestions thank you so much for your help.


message 23: by Sally (new)

Sally (brasscastle) | 261 comments I'm working with this dialog/dialect issue a bit myself, in my current work. My main character interviews a old fellow with a heavy local accent, so heavy that even my main character has trouble deciphering what the old man says until he's listened for a while. So far, none of my beta readers has mentioned finding difficulty with the vernacular as I have written it, including a blind woman who has to listen to it on her computer reader. If I get any comments from other beta readers about this, I will consider toning it down a bit. But I am pleased that this is not raising a red flag among my beta readers so far. I hope it means I've struck a balance between the richness of the language and the necessity of the reader to know what's being said.

I agree that such "bad English" should be restricted to dialog alone, with this exception: If the story is in first-person and is narrated by that main character who is poorly educated in English, then selecting a few key words (as suggested by others here) to misspell consistently to indicate to the reader that this is how the narrator speaks (internally as well as externally) is an acceptable way to go. That vernacular and its colloquialisms can lend much richness to the story.

But again, as pointed out by others here, this kind of dialog/dialect/narration should be thoughtfully and carefully done.


message 24: by Delores (new)

Delores Cremm | 20 comments Good morning Sally thanks for your insight. My narrator speaks poor English as well, below is a passage from her narrative:

Sunday mornin' started as usual mama-fixin' pannycake with the crust burnt round the edgas and fryin' salt bacon fo goin' to Sista Jackson's church on Washington Street. Mr. Joe would say, "she aint no saint, shackin' up with Ezel and runnin' numbas". Mama and he always had the same argument every Sunday. "It don’t matter what she does long as she speakin' the words from the good book, mama say and us kidz laugh when he pretendit to be sista Jackson in mama's wig flyin' off his head whilst he get the Holy Ghost. A knock on the back door shook me up dis mornin'. Miz Watson and Sabrina's two brothas came over askin if anybody saw her.

My character did not pronounce the word door, and that is my challenge. I'm finding it difficult to keep consistent with her speaking. If you notice in the first line I used the instead of what she actually said. Is it okay to use proper phrases in this style and not take away the richness of the dialect?


message 25: by Sally (new)

Sally (brasscastle) | 261 comments Wow! This sounds really rich! I like it. It is full of the dialect flavor, and I don't find any difficulty in understanding what the narrator is saying. I don't think you'll want to alter ALL of her language into dialect, but your selections of certain words to alter and dropping the 'g' from 'ing' words is doing the trick. And of course, much of the richness comes from the words that such a narrator would use naturally , like turns of phrase.

The voice of a story can be a funny (and powerful) thing. I wrote a short story a number of years ago - actually, the story insisted that I write it, it would not leave me alone until I did so - about Abraham Lincoln as told by a ghost flag that flies over his tomb. I am a white woman, with deep New England roots, but the voice of this story (a story ), as I wrote it down, was clearly the voice of a black man in my ear. I have been thinking about asking a friend of mine, a black Navy veteran with a strong interest in Civil War history, to read it aloud for me so I can record it as I hear it in my mind.


message 26: by Delores (new)

Delores Cremm | 20 comments Wow it is amazing what lives in an author's mind. Sue Monk Kid is the author of the Secret life of Bees and she wrote her story which included Southern African American women and done a superb job in dialect.

I was raised in Midwest Ohio and have a series with French speaking characters and have never traveled abroad or studied the language. When I am able to do audiobooks, I would prefer my work to be read in a European voice because it's the voice I heard in my mind.

Your story is pure muse and of course muse does not care about your nationality. I hope you published it because the synopsis is magnificent.


message 27: by Sally (new)

Sally (brasscastle) | 261 comments I've printed it out and sold a few copies of it, but although I have submitted it to a few places (literary magazines, contests), so far no one has been interested in publishing it. One fellow who bought it emailed to me that he found it "charming." It may yet find its day...


message 28: by Mary (new)

Mary Nickum | 11 comments Delores wrote: "I'm not sure if this is relevant to this group discussion but I am working on a novel that has very poor english and writing it has been a challenge. My character's dialogue for example would say d..."

Delores, as a writer/editor/publisher, I recommend you keep the poor English to dialogue only. Keep the narrative and anything else that is information for the reader in perfect English.


message 29: by Mary (new)

Mary Nickum | 11 comments Delores wrote: "My mentor suggested to drop the g in certain words such as fixing which turns into fixin this can train the readers eyes and distinguish dialect at the same time. I've added to my word vocabulary. ..."

Stay true to your character, otherwise you will confuse the reader.


message 30: by Delores (new)

Delores Cremm | 20 comments Thank you Mary, but the story is written in the first person and she is the narrator and her English is poor. Should I use perfect English in this case?


message 31: by Victor (new)

Victor Rangel-Ribeiro | 19 comments No, Delores, you should not. In a first person story, the way the narrator speaks is ruled by who the narrator is as a person. If he is, shall we say, partly educated, both the dialog and the narration should consistently portray that.

You can find good models in novels by Hemingway set in Spain and Italy, and also in Naipaul's A House for Mr. Biswas. However, these are not first-person narrations. You will have to be careful that if the language in your story is too poor, it may turn off your readers who think the narrator is indeed you, the author. Your first paragraph therefore should present an incident or a situation that gets the readers hooked right away, so they will keep on reading until the end.


message 32: by RLB (new)

RLB Hartmann (rlbh) | 10 comments Delores wrote:

Sunday mornin' started as usual mama-fixin' pannycake with the crust bur..."


When you want a dash, use an m-dash (the long kind). What I see above in "mama-fixin'" is a hyphen. Also, I tend to just drop those final "g's" with no apostrophe needed (enough of those appear in words that actually must have them!). Too, when "mama" is used as the person's name, it should be capitalized. When the possessive adjective comes first, it isn't. For example: Mama told me to fix supper. My mama told me to fix supper.
As for that narrator, I see you have conflicting advice. Can you rethink the narrator to allow for BETTER English, though by no means perfect (even us old English teachers in the South don't always talk in perfect English).


message 33: by Mary (new)

Mary Nickum | 11 comments Delores wrote: "Thank you Mary, but the story is written in the first person and she is the narrator and her English is poor. Should I use perfect English in this case?"

If not in dialog, I'd say yes. But, I'd have to actually see the story to give you good advice. My advice, at this point, is to join a critique group, either local or online, and run it by them for advice.


message 34: by Danny (new)

Danny Johnson | 41 comments Hi, Delores...the best advice I've ever gotten (from a best selling author) is when you are using dialect, first use it as an example of the character's voice, but from then, speak as you would in correct English...it sets the dialect in the reader's mind, but then allows them to read and follow the story without stumbling over words they may not be familiar with...hope it helps. best


message 35: by David (new)

David Ssembajjo | 82 comments You need to use language that is understandable even though it is not written in perfect English. Place yourself in the boots of the reader and the message must be accessible and the language should be appealing and the most important thing for an author is to put across the message in a detailed and coherent style.


message 36: by Elyce (new)

Elyce Wakerman | 35 comments As I found with my novel, A Tale of Two Citizens, writing with an accent is tricky business. Especially when you want to record the character's thoughts and interweave these with the narrator's standard English, you have to mostly use your ears and hope that they will get you to a place that will be comfortable for the reader. It's all about hearing and sensitive transitions.


message 37: by Will (last edited Jul 18, 2016 12:48AM) (new)

Will Once (willonce) | 210 comments I read somewhere, or mebbe I dreamt it, that putting dialeck into speech is like sprinkling salt and pepper on your chips. A little bit makes everythink taste better. Too much and it'll taste like poo.

One dialeck word per sentence is a decent rule of thumb. If thumbs could rule, Two words per sentence ifn you like it salty. Any more 'n that and it all starts to get too salty.

'Member also that first person speech ain't just about the choice of words. You can also mess with stuff like sentence length, vocab choice, use of imagery, that sort of stuff. Just don't forget the golden rule. One per sentence is well seasoned. Two is on the salty side. You really don't wanna go more than two.


message 38: by Danny (new)

Danny Johnson | 41 comments good comment, Will..agree completely...


message 39: by Michael (new)

Michael (michaelelias) | 5 comments Delores, you're doing just fine. I think you have the right balance between authenticity of speech and clarity for the readers. David, you summed it up well; nicely put. In my own book, I also have one of the main characters as African-American (40s, male), and he's grown up in a Black family and in mixed communities, thus he has a certain accent and idiom which is reflected in the way I have spelled the words when he speaks. He uses many expressions which originated in Black society. I love accents in writing; I think they add realism and color for the reader. Also, I have a Hispanic (from Colombia/Panama) younger male character whose accent is also reflected in phonetic spelling of speech (altered vowels, verb grammar, words like 'escared' for 'scared', etc.). I used this device a lot, but I think the meaning of each word remains clear to the readers. I can give you more examples if you're interested.
Hope this helps,
Michael Elias


message 40: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Goerl | 137 comments Ever since I found this thread, I've been trying to remember this interview I read with this author about how she handled her rural Tennessee dialect. She ended up using a lot less local flavor than her early drafts had, and the critics loved the result for how "accurate" her rendering of the dialect was. Will's probably given you the best advice so far.

As to narration, keep in mind that narration's more writing than remembered dialog; the same person who knows enough to write "Mama told me to get some collard greens, because she was going to fix supper," might read it as "Mama tol' me t'git sum colla'greens, 'cause she's gonna fix supper." So I'd say back off on the narration: if it's actually a different word, use it; if it's just a matter of pronunciation, use standard spelling.


message 41: by Delores (new)

Delores Cremm | 20 comments Fusty wrote: "Delores
I enjoyed your dialect excerpt. When it has a rhythm it becomes almost like rap:

"En wid dat I fetch' her a slap side de head dat sont her a-sprawlin'. Den I went into de yuther room, en '..."


Wow what a piece for an example from Mark Twain. I noticed at the end of the paragraph, legible words were written and I believe the era is set in the late 1800s. Mine's written in 1965 were education was more available but in conversing with relatives, neighbors and friends the tone is different.


message 42: by David (new)

David Ssembajjo | 82 comments Michael wrote: "Delores, you're doing just fine. I think you have the right balance between authenticity of speech and clarity for the readers. David, you summed it up well; nicely put. In my own book, I also have..."

Please give me some examples and I know you are skilled enough to handle language in its own context.


message 43: by Delores (last edited Jul 19, 2016 10:26AM) (new)

Delores Cremm | 20 comments I can give you my character's closing paragraph, which inspired the initial story. It's amazing that she spoke these words first and my job is to listen and develop the actual plot. This is still in a draft stage. I free write and critique after the story is complete.

I sometimes think about Moochie, Alice, Buddy, black Jim, white Jim and his sister Jolene, Parnell, Miz. Wilma, Ralphie boy, Cecil, Mr. Collins and the bull daggers Edda May and Miz Lucy. It's funny how our lives changed from the summer of 1965.
Who woulda thought back den Mr. Collins would shoot Parnell in a boot joint broil, and Moochie get killed in Vietnam. I heard Ralphie boy went to jail fo robbin' the national bank on third street with Cecil. They say black Jim went off to California and made a lot of money at Paramount Pictures, but I aint never seen em star in nothin'. White Jim went into politics and spoze t' be a Mayor of some city in Virginia and his sister Jolene teach school fo retarded kidz. My brother Arnie married Miz. Wilma's daughter Jeanie and they got three children and own a gas station on Milford Road, but the rest of Miz. Wilma's kidz never mounted to nut em special. I don’t know what happen to Buddy but I sometimes see Alice walkin' round the old neighborhood wit her clubfoot and it saddens me of how she got it saving my life.
The city finally tow down, the house on Gunther, twenty five years later and dey found small human bones buried in the rubble. I guess Sabrina Watson finally came home.


message 44: by Delores (new)

Delores Cremm | 20 comments Using English I would write her closing line as follows.

The city tore down the house on Gunther, twenty five years later and found small human remains in the rubble. Sabrina Watson finally came home.


message 45: by David (new)

David Ssembajjo | 82 comments Delores wrote: "I can give you my character's closing paragraph, which inspired the initial story. It's amazing that she spoke these words first and my job is to listen and develop the actual plot. This is still i..."

It sounds perfectly visible and you need to work out your audience. However I loved the rhythmical narration which could attract a significant readership and the beginning is gripping; and ends on a optomistic note. I can't suggest any changes but carry
on. If you are satisfied with it then go ahead.


message 46: by Delores (new)

Delores Cremm | 20 comments David wrote: "Delores wrote: "I can give you my character's closing paragraph, which inspired the initial story. It's amazing that she spoke these words first and my job is to listen and develop the actual plot...." Thank you David, the novel is titled the Dead alligator on Gunther Road. Its pre-released in B&N and scheduled for release in November. I haven't worked out my audience as of yet but I feel the story is powerful enough to attract a great deal of readership but with all author's we write our stories and cross our fingers.


message 47: by Perry (last edited Jul 20, 2016 04:58PM) (new)

Perry Lake Although white, I grew up in a predominantly black neighborhood and I write various dialects in my stories. I have some suggestions, based on what I see in your sample. Asking your indulgence, I present them here:
"Sometimes I think about Moochie, Alice, Buddy, Black Jim, White Jim, his sister Jolene, Parnell, Miz Wilma, Ralphie boy, Cecil, Mr. Collins, and the bull daggers, Edda May and Miz Lucy. Funny how our lives changed in the summer of 1965.
Back den who woulda thought Mr. Collins would go shoot Parnell in a boot joint broil, or dat Moochie would get himself kilt in Vietnam? I heard Ralphie boy went to jail fo' robbin' the national bank on third street with Cecil. They say Black Jim went off to California and made a lot of money at Paramount Pictures, but I ain't never seen 'im star in nuttin'. White Jim went into politics and spoze t' be a Mayor of some city in Virginia and his sister Jolene teach school fo' retarded kidz. My brother Arnie, he married Miz Wilma's daughter, Jeanie, n' they got three children and own a gas station on Milford Road, but the rest of Miz Wilma's kidz, they never mounted to nuttin'. I don’t know what happen to Buddy but I sometimes see Alice walkin' round the old neighborhood wit her clubfoot and it saddens me of how she got it saving my life.
The city finally tow down the house on Gunther, twenty-five years later and dey found small human bones buried in the rubble. I guess Sabrina Watson finally came home. "
Remember, these are only suggestions.


message 48: by David (new)

David Ssembajjo | 82 comments There is nothing wrong with this peace of work. You have a good story opportunity to improve on the work and so far, this is a great piece where everybody goes to find work and in a tragic sort of way ends by finding bones buried in the rubble. You should try and pace your story and give it a launch.


message 49: by Michael (last edited Jul 21, 2016 07:36AM) (new)

Michael (michaelelias) | 5 comments David, I'm assuming you meant the request for Delores when you asked for some examples, and she has furnished some. Just in case you (also?) meant it for me, I'll illustrate (even if not, this might further help Delores and many other authors): [Malcolm is addressing protagonist Mark]: "...an' lock it when you come in. Don' want no muthaf***as botherin' me up in here." I've got a lot more if interested, lol....
Cheerfully,
Michael Elias


message 50: by Mary (new)

Mary (maryhagen14yahoocom) | 28 comments I think your comments are worthwhile and something to think about. I use dialect in my western historical books with some characters, but not all. I grew up on a ranch in Wyoming and heard cowboy dialect, but also know not everyone in the state used cowboy dialect.


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