Tattoos & Children's Literature discussion

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Sources for Book Finding

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message 1: by Jim (new)

Jim Erekson (ereksonj) | 9 comments Mod
Refer back to the survey on sources for Book Finding. Discuss what you might try in the 2nd half of the course to impact the ongoing flow of books. Have you used starred reviews from SLJ, Kirkus, Horn Book? Have you used 'preferred searches' from your local library? Have you used Prospector or ILL to get books not available locally? What professional habits can you create in this last 4 weeks of class?


message 2: by Maddie (new)

Maddie Shell | 13 comments In reflecting on my book finding in the past, I have really tried to focus on a specific topic or subject for each week. I am trying to think ahead of what I know I will be teaching during the school year so that I can build up my ideas for books now rather than later. I find that the most helpful part of Goodreads is following other educators. I love looking at what they are currently reading or wanting to read. I steal their ideas (ha ha!) and see if I can find the same books that they are reading.

I actually have never used any review sources from SLJ, Kirkus, and Horn Book. I have, in the past, just looked at the reviews on Goodreads. I definitely will keep those places in mind in the future when I am looking for books for myself or for my students. I find the easiest way to find books on Goodreads is to actually run a Google search on the topic that I am looking for. It will then pull up a link to Goodreads that has that collection all put together. For the last four units, that is how I have been finding my books to read. Also, I love how Goodreads takes in account my history of searches, habits, and preferences of books and recommends me some more to read. I really must say that I have gotten a lot of great book ideas from that. Also, in commenting on other people's Goodreads blogs on Blackboard, I have gotten even more ideas. It is so fun to read reviews on books that people in our own cohort have read because we are all looking at books in a somewhat similar lens right now and trying to apply all that we have learned, so it's cool to see what great books are out there that apply to this class.

When I go to find the books, I usually go to my classroom library at school or to our school's library. We actually have an awesome variety of books! And, our librarian is always wanting new book suggestions, so if we don't have that book and I think that the school needs it, I will just tell her about it. I have actually been so enjoying finding new children's books that I have been purchasing some of the books I really like online for myself and for my library - Oops...

For the last four weeks of book finding, I definitely want to try the new review sources, award winning books, and go to my own local library more. I want to create these habits now so that they are in place by the time that school starts. Overall, I have really enjoyed my experience on Goodreads. I love being able to connect with other educators or fellow book readers. It is such an awesome way to keep connected with books and get great ideas from others. I look forward to furthering my professional growth as a reading teacher using Goodreads and the above sites that were mentioned.


message 3: by Chelsea (new)

Chelsea Rusch (chelsealanes) | 6 comments For the most part, I have turned to lists on Goodreads as a springboard for my book findings. I will find a few lists, look through the reviews, and then make my own list of books I want to check out. I have rarely looked for outside lists, other than Caldecott's and a few good teaching blogs. While I have begun to build a relationship with my librarian, I'll typically walk in with a list of books I am already set on. It will do me well to start finding other reliable lists outside of Goodreads during the second half.I have relied heavily on the public library for my book findings. In the last few weeks, I want to use more of Prospector and ILL.
In my midterm survey, I said that I am trying to make it a habit to gather books on Sundays. I'm finding that that doesn't always work for me and am looking at other ways I know I'll be able to commit time to picking up books. The weekends have been so busy, and I've been making excuses for that. After I thought about it, my weekends during the school year are even more busy because the week is spent working. Now I am looking for a more maintainable habit, such as making a list of books on Monday and going to pick them up when I'm out and about on Wednesday. I'm glad I have the time to play around with forming a book finding habit before school starts and I completely fall off the bandwagon.


message 4: by Allison (last edited Jul 06, 2016 08:17AM) (new)

Allison Pearse | 24 comments In looking back at my survey and reflecting on my flow of book finding, I'm so pleased that I've discovered some great sources that I will continue to use in both my personal and professional life. With hope, I will continue to find more outlets through which to discover books, too.

I hadn't used Goodreads before this class, and I really like being able to organize books by "shelves." This will make it a quick resource to look back upon during the school year. Also, I really appreciate all of the great book lists that point me toward quality literature. It's fun to see what the rest of my classmates are reading, and it gives me good ideas of how to expand my own repertoire of novels. I hope to continue shelving books and diving into the lists on Goodreads when looking for both personal and professional literature. Also, I've found that Facebook can be a surprisingly good tool through which to get ideas about books to read. It's fun to talk to friends and family online about what books they recommend, and what books they adore for different ages of readers.

A few years back, I spent a brief time working in my school's Media Center, so I'm really fortunate to have a wonderful rapport with the librarians. From working with them, I learned about SLJ and Horn Book Reviews, and also the benefit of looking at award winners (Caldecott, Newberry, etc.). Often the librarians scour these sites for me during the school year and report back on hot titles. We either order or ILL the new books and preview them. I want to get better at digging through Horn and SLJ on my own. Also, I need to check out Kirkus-- I'm not too familiar with that one.

The public library has been my home base during this class. Whatever is unavailable for immediate pickup is typically available through Prospector/ILL. Also, I became friends with a couple of the ladies in the children's department, and they are a wealth of knowledge. I would like to extend this by also getting to know some of the individuals who work in the Young Adult section. I knew some in the past, and they would come to my school to do "book talks," but they have since retired. I would like to reestablish relationships with that department so I can once again have them work directly with my school.

All of this book finding has made me excited about reading again, and it's reminded me that my students sometimes need to get excited about reading, too. I want to be sure that I set aside time in my class to talk about good books, to let kids look at book reviews, and to essentially "advertise" how fun it is to discover stories. Then, I need to be able to get these books in my students' hands. I'm really good at using libraries as free sources of books, but I need to start discovering inexpensive ways to acquire titles in order to build my own classroom library. This is one of my major goals of the last half of this class. My classroom library needs a makeover, and then it will need constant upkeep in order to meet the needs of my students. I want to make this a professional habit. It's time that I start looking to thrift stores, donors, and free library stands. If anybody knows of other good, inexpensive sources of literature, please let me know!


message 5: by Katie (new)

Katie Boisen | 17 comments After reflecting on my book finding in the past, I have to say that I started out using themed weeks such as past read-alouds, folk/fairy tales, adult fiction, and picture books. It was a nice way to help me focus my week in Goodreads. I was putting them all in the categories of either Read, Currently Reading, Want to Read. What I'd really like to do is to be able to categorize them further into those themes, but I haven't found a way yet. I bet I could make a shelf for each type of genre but then they wouldn't be in my EDRD shelf? For the second half of the course, I'd like to continue to focus on themed weeks even though at this point they are all in one big area all together. I'd also like to become friends with more people in the class and use some of their recommendations. I also categorized a lot of the mentor texts from our writing class and want to continue to do that for each subject I teach. I just don't have the time to read everything that I want to read. These are all professional strategies to continue a good flow of books that I will continue to utilize. I have also been sharing many of the new resources (mentor text, mini-lessons) from our writing class with my fourth grade teammates at Zach Elementary, in hopes of building a stronger professional learning community.
I haven't used any starred reviews yet, but I plan to. I find myself utilizing the public library as well as my own classroom library and my school library for book readings. I really like the fact that I've been getting into my classroom and school library more because those are my closest and most realistic resources for books during the school year. I've always utilized my school library, and my librarian loves it and tells me myself and another teacher are about the only ones that do! That seems crazy to me, but who knows, maybe the other teachers have their own resources. I just hope the school librarian continues to love my love for using the library because I anticipate it's going to be doubled this upcoming year.


message 6: by Danielle (new)

Danielle Rossé | 11 comments Before this class my book finding typically consisted of pinterest, friends/colleague recommendations, and what I would find in my frequent perusals of Barnes & Noble. These have all been great resources and I have found tons of great books for my classroom library, but I am glad that this class has given me even more book finding tools. Throughout the first half of this class I have really been utilizing Goodreads for my book finding. I enjoy looking into other groups and what they are reading as well as what other teachers have on their shelves. I have been able to reconnect with my of my English Ed. friends from my undergrad through Goodreads which has been wonderful and a great source of help in book finding.
During the second half of this class I would like to expand my book finding resources to using things such as SLJ, Kirkus, and Horn Book. These are not resources that I was familiar with before this week but in digging through them a bit more they seem like they will be very helpful. In my midterm survey I found that I use very little review sources or award lists when finding books which I would like to begin to do more of. My hope is that this will help me to bring a wider variety of books into my classroom library. I am going to try to turn to these for my last few weeks of book finding so that I can become well versed in using them before the school year begins.


message 7: by Danielle (new)

Danielle Rossé | 11 comments Allison I am also always looking for new and inexpensive ways to get books into my classroom. The thrift stores around town are definitely a great option! I get books from Arc and Goodwill all the time and they are always in great condition and super cheap. Lately I would say that Arc has had a much bigger young adult section than Goodwill. I also know that the library does a sale every summer which could be another way to get affordable books. This might be a good way to replace some of the books that kids love and read constantly because they are often older titles. I know some of my classroom favorites are looking a bit sad and worn and could definitely stand some replacing! Scholastic is also a good source. Twice a year they have warehouse sales at one of the hotel's in town and you can get pretty good deals on books at those as well.


message 8: by Erin (new)

Erin Ewing | 18 comments On looking back at the book finding survey I realize that I have been pretty one dimensional in my book finding. I have been hitting up Poudre Library and perusing the shelves. I have really enjoyed what I have found, but I see that using the book lists and going with a purpose can be important and also frustrating if you don't find what you are looking for.

The book finding right now is enjoyable because we have been given some direction, but otherwise are free to just search. As I stated in my Goodreads blog, I feel that my searching is a bit un-authentic because I don't have students right now driving my book choices. In the past weeks, I have just simply gone to the library and pulled books from the shelves. This week, I was purposeful about looking at different lists (SLJ, Horn Book, Great Kids, We are Teachers, etc.) While these lists are great resources, at first glance, they are overwhelming and I get sidetracked quickly. I am hopeful that I can familiarize myself with these lists so that when school starts I can be spontaneous and quickly find books of interest to capitalize on teaching moments.

As we all know, teaching is a profession of quick-change-plans with teachers requiring cat-like reflexes. Our curriculum plans can change on a dime when a great teachable moment strikes. These lists can be great resources in these situations and I am hopeful that my school library will have ample book choices to access appropriate titles quickly.

My plan for the second half of this course is to really think about the different aspects of my curriculum in literacy and seek out titles that can enhance my curriculum and create book lists for easy reference. Books about school and the joy of reading are great ways to start the year. Familiarizing myself with the K-3 regular education science and social studies curriculum will help me to find specific books to enhance the curriculum or to share with the regular education teachers. Also, kids always enjoy holiday specific titles, so now can be the time to seek out those as well. Having these specific topics in mind when using book lists can really help me to narrow down my search and make book finding not so overwhelming.


message 9: by Megan (last edited Jul 10, 2016 08:22PM) (new)

Megan Downey | 21 comments In addition to suggestions from Goodreads, I have been searching all of the titles that won awards over the past few years and then have purchased some used books online using AbeBooks. I also have asked the public library to find some books for me using Prospector, and I found that process to be very quick and simple.
I have to admit that for my classroom library, I usually choose books that are of high interest or ones that are new releases or free from Scholastic. I think the reason for this is because I have always had easier access to these types of books. Now I know that it's important to have other resources for finding quality books for both free reading time and instruction.


message 10: by Monica (new)

Monica Ver Meer | 13 comments Before this class I brought new books into my room primarily from our school library and from Scholastic book orders. I know that I have already greatly increased my search and that I will be bringing in new books much for frequently. For the second half of this class, I would like to move beyond my renewed love for local library and suggestion lists on goodreads. I have't explored SLJ, Kirkus, Horn Book yet but plan on doing that. I also want to narrow my searches a bit more. Currently I have just been looking for titles that look interesting and new books that help to broaden my current collection. I want to place an emphasis on author studies this year and humanize authors for my students. I need to start researching which authors I want to focus on and begin to explore which books I want to share with my class! I want to get into a habit of researching authors books, both past and current books, so that I can really expose my students to a variety of their work and as many titles as I can. If I can get into this habit now, it will be easier to carry it out throughout this school year.


message 11: by Annie (new)

Annie | 15 comments When I look back at my book finding sources, I think that I have improved but haven't branched out enough. Right now, how I get access to my books is by the local library near me and by using pinterest and other online sources. I have not used the Prospector and ILL source yet, mainly because I am not near a UNC library at all. I have been using Abe Books a lot in order to get my books. My main way of getting access to books and doing my book finding has been just by going to the library and roaming through the popular books at the moment, or ones that are standing up. I also look at what kids around me are reading. I find this way the most successful for me at the moment. During the 2nd half of the class, I want to try different ways of getting access to books and see what other students are using. Through the past weeks that we have been doing the writing class, I have been just attending the library to do work for that class, and to book find. It has been working out nicely!


message 12: by Bri (new)

Bri Schupp | 14 comments I feel like this class has been very beneficial in opening my eyes to a much wider expanse of books, authors, and avenues for bringing books into my classroom. I will be using the mentor text list we created in the writing class for sure. I feel very confident using Goodreads now and will spend the second half of the class familiarizing myself with starred reviews from SLJ, Kirkus, Horn Book. I will also spend more time researching and acquiring award lists. I have been going to local thrift stores and ordering used books that I've fallen in love with as well. I think a teacher recently donated a ton of books. I am also going to do much more with author studies and mentors in my class this year. I love the idea of kids learning to write from a real person and not just a "text." I began this project with my multi-genre project and am excited to continue it. The other thought I have had as I've been thinking about this flow of books is space. I'm in a modular and have limited space for my classroom library. I think I'm really going to circulate my books through more. I think this might help my library always feel fresh and not stagnant. I'll utilize the school and public library much more than I have in the past.


message 13: by Lanae (last edited Jul 06, 2016 04:22PM) (new)

Lanae Zaragoza | 14 comments After reviewing my survey, I have realized I use many resources to find books. Mostly, I look to Goodreads because I am familiar with navigating through the site and we use it often for our course. It is also convenient that there is a Goodreads App. I like to use Goodreads because there is a way to organize books in a way that works for me. It is also nice to friend classmates and friends on Goodreads. This is a great way to see what other people are reading and what they thought of the book. There are so many options on Goodreads, and I like to see the recommendations that pop up after I have finished a book. This keeps a constant flow of books coming my way and I don’t necessarily have to search for them.

Some other resources I have used are Amazon and Pinterest. Pinterest is a great way to see what other teachers recommend, and follow links to new websites with lists and lists of books. Amazon is great for creating a wish list of books. My wish list has grown tremendously this summer and I have been purchasing books all summer. One thing that I have enjoyed about all three sources is they are connected. If I look on Goodreads and Pinterest for specific books, lots of time there is an Amazon button I can click. This is convenient and has helped my Amazon Classroom Library wish list grow.

The Public Library in my area has been very helpful this summer. I have made friends with the librarians and am now comfortable navigating through the library to find books. I love spending time at the library and bringing books home to read. In the two years I have taught, I have never searched out books as much as I have been this summer. I feel comfortable going into my third year teaching with a wide knowledge base of books and will continue to have an ongoing flow of books coming in my direction in my future.

I have never used Horn Book, SLJ, or Kirkus before but I will be looking into those resources in the weeks to come. Over the next few weeks left of class, I would like to broaden my sources for incoming books. I would like to look at award winning lists, and different genres that will help with the organization of my classroom library. I think this assignment has turned into a habit for me and will help me build a classroom library that gets kids excited about reading.


message 14: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Carpenter | 19 comments In reflecting on my book finding over the past few weeks, I have focused on books that I would use in my own class, as well as books from my childhood that I wanted to revisit. I have use the goodreads reviews frequently, as well as recommended books. Seeing what other people are reading has also been insightful. I have also searched for books that have received awards, such as Caldecott winners. I also have two young boys of my own, and I frequently ask them for their thoughts and interests when choosing books. I would like to continue to build my options for searching out new books. I took a look at the prospector tool this week, just to see what was available, and I think this is definitely a tool I would like to use in the future, as would great when there is a particular book that I really want to use and can't find locally. For the next four weeks of class I want to continue to use my library as a resource, as well as the Horn Books, SLJ, or Kirkus, as I really haven't had a chance to use those.


message 15: by KBirdsall (new)

KBirdsall | 14 comments I feel that I have barely scratched the surface of book finding. Before I began this class, my book finding was based on my own personal experiences as an avid reader, recommendations from friends and fellow teachers, a few internet searches, and the occasional time I ask a school librarian. This class as well as the writing class has made me really think about mentor texts and my personal classroom library. I had never used goodreads, but I do feel that my continuous search on goodreads is helping develop good habits. This class also has encouraged me to spend more time in my local public libraries talking to librarians about contemporary popular teen fiction. While I don’t use any of the reviews or preferred searches from the libraries, I feel that I have expanded my book search and my ability to find good books for my students. Also, the mentor list that we made for the writer’s workshop really helped me focus on what I am trying to teach through chosen texts and helped me understand the difference between modes and genres.
I think one habit I would like to develop is transferring my book finding skills into actually developing not only a classroom library, but genre-interest bookmarks. I want to be able to recommend other books students might find interesting based on the genre or author that they already have an interest in. My goal as an 8th grade reading teacher has always been to help create life-long readers, and I think that comes from finding books that interest my students and then expanding on those interests. I would want these bookmarks to be full of new release books and to be ever changing and getting add-ons. I also want to be able to teach my students to do their own book findings and recommendations. Goodreads is easy to learn, especially for my internet-focused kiddos, so they can have fun looking for books and creating their own shelves.
I think as far as professional habits I can develop, I need to work on building that classroom library by looking at Goodwill, Booklovers, ebay, etc. and buying books for my kids. I often have a hard time planning things out far in advanced, so I need to have things prepared by starting to look now. If I am doing a historical fiction/autobiographical unit, I need to have lots of books for kids to choose from if they are interested. I also need to apply for donorschoose and other sites since I already know my budget will be smaller than last year and will mainly go to art supplies (being a K-12 art teacher means ALL of your budget goes to getting enough supplies for those kids!) I need to start to filter and choose the books I put in my classroom library because I have limited space. I also would like to work with the public book mobile so that I can perhaps have 10 books each month that are continuously rotating so that I get new books into my student’s hands. I must always keep in mind that I work in a rural school where they don’t have access to a public library except the book mobile, and they do not take advantage of that or the small school library because it only caters to elementary readers.
So, in the next four weeks I need to find books intended for my classroom library by putting on a more focused lens in my book searches. I need to start buying cheap books, not just borrowing them from the library, in order to get a plethora of books in my classroom. I need to start planning in advances so I can have an ever changing classroom library that fits the needs of my students, and build on the interests of my students by creating genre bookmarks to spark further interests. It seems like a lot to do, but luckily I’m also developing a network of reading teacher peers who can build on those book recommendations!


message 16: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca S | 13 comments Finding a variety of books that appeal to a diverse community is never simple. My first few weeks of book finding focused on picture books and I utilized several familiar book finding strategies including subject and keyword searches in library catalogs, inter-library loans, professional bibliographies, recommendations from friends and colleagues, and just plain old fashioned browsing. All of these worked reasonably well and I plan to continue them. However, while we were on break I discovered a new form of book finding in the form of professional conferences.

I had the opportunity to attend the American Library Association (ALA) conference and was bombarded by brand new books from a variety of publishers. Not only were they giving away "uncorrected proofs" but I also had multiple opportunities to hear from authors themselves. It is amazing how hearing the story behind why a book was written can immediately create a connection with a book you have not even read yet. Now getting books that have not been published can be a little risky since you do not have a lot of professional reviews to rely on, but there is also a unique sense of excitement when you get to read a book before anyone else. Many of the librarians I know have connections with publishers and tend to get a plethora of uncorrected proofs. While these do not hold up as well as the officially published copy, they are free and kids, especially teens, tend to be excited about reading new books that other people don't have access to yet. The additions to my Goodreads list have certainly come from my experience at ALA, and now the challenging part is finding time to read everything.


message 17: by Bri (new)

Bri Schupp | 14 comments Rebecca wrote: "Finding a variety of books that appeal to a diverse community is never simple. My first few weeks of book finding focused on picture books and I utilized several familiar book finding strategies in..."

I love how you said, "... I also had multiple opportunities to hear from authors themselves. It is amazing how hearing the story behind why a book was written can immediately create a connection with a book you have not even read yet."

I have not ever spent much time focusing on the author before. After reading "More About the Authors," I see the value in bringing the authors to life in the classroom. I love the idea of kids feeling as if they are friends with the author and can learn from them not only content, but writing and illustrating techniques.


message 18: by Katie (new)

Katie Boisen | 17 comments Danielle wrote: "Allison I am also always looking for new and inexpensive ways to get books into my classroom. The thrift stores around town are definitely a great option! I get books from Arc and Goodwill all the ..."

Great resources, Danielle! I enjoy going to thrift stores and am going to add a look-see into their book section now!


message 19: by Katie (new)

Katie Boisen | 17 comments Rebecca wrote: "Finding a variety of books that appeal to a diverse community is never simple. My first few weeks of book finding focused on picture books and I utilized several familiar book finding strategies in..."

Bringing authors into the classroom/school setting is such a wonderful resource! We have an array of authors here in Fort Collins, and I've utilized quite a few to come speak to my students about the writing process. Tim Northburg is an author who loves coming to talk to classrooms and Shaundra Schultz is an illustrator who has also come to speak to my class.


message 20: by Jenna (new)

Jenna | 16 comments Reflecting on my book finding that past few weeks has been enlightening. I really did not have any sort of flow in my classroom unless it was science or social studies based books or one mentor text (compared to many many mentor texts). Now I realize the importance of continually bringing in new books. I feel very lucky because I was just given multiple boxes of books that I have really enjoyed going through. I am utilizing the mentor text list that was created in EDRD 642 and am happy to find that a lot of those books are in the boxes I received. I am still using my local library and plan to use my school library more this coming year. Goodreads has become more natural to me and I feel very comfortable using it to search for more books. I was thinking I could even make a shelf for my classroom library or multiple shelves. It would be so helpful to catalogue all my books so I can easily see if I have a particular book or not. The shelves could be by genre, level, topic etc, whatever is helpful for you and matches your classroom library. I have not looked into reviews from SLJ, Kirkus, or Horn Book but am excited to start using that as another resource. It seems very helpful in finding a particular book or just opening my eyes to new books. Personally, I really need to engage in book finding with a purpose otherwise I feel like it is too open ended. I am hoping to work on that so that I can easily stumble across great books and not pass them up even if they don't fit into my book finding goal. Next year, I am definitely going to continue my flow of books as well as share with my students what I am doing. I think if they see me always reading new books and introducing them to the classroom then they will be excited and possibly participate in book finding as well.


message 21: by Allison (new)

Allison Pearse | 24 comments Danielle wrote: "Before this class my book finding typically consisted of pinterest, friends/colleague recommendations, and what I would find in my frequent perusals of Barnes & Noble. These have all been great res..."

Danielle, are there book lists on Pinterest? How does it work? I never considered using Pinterest as a source for book finding---thanks for the tip. I'll have to check it out.


message 22: by Lauren (new)

Lauren Crouse | 13 comments After reviewing my midterm assessment I have realized I have used a variety of sources to gather books for our book finding assignment.

Goodreads has been a popular one for me to use this summer. I like using this source because once I find one title of a poem or fairy tale I like the site will recommend similar titles. This helps when trying to find the genres of books I have been looking into.

I've also realized a big source I have been using is recommendations from other people. I really enjoy reading each others blogs because they can give me ideas for the types of books I might be interested to read for the following week.

Other online sources that I have also used include Google, Pinterest and Teachers Pay Teachers. I have been able to find a list of books on each site and they normally have a teaching point that goes along with the book.

In the next several weeks I hope to explore other resources including Kirkus and Horn book. Hopefully these resources will be another tool I can add to my kit for book finding.

To continue book finding in the future I have realized that I want to find books where they have a purpose in my classroom. During our writing course we were assigned to find mentor texts. Instead of just finding a huge list of books, I went through each book and found a teaching point I could use the book for. I believe this type of record keeping will help alleviate some stress for me because then during the school year I can go back to the list and see the books I have already found for myself.


message 23: by Kiah (new)

Kiah Swanson | 18 comments Maddie wrote: "In reflecting on my book finding in the past, I have really tried to focus on a specific topic or subject for each week. I am trying to think ahead of what I know I will be teaching during the scho..."

Maddie, stealing ideas and books from other teachers is my favorite part of Goodreads as well. I find that I trust the opinions of teachers more, knowing that they are likely seeking books for similar purposes. I also like the idea of looking ahead to what you are going to be teaching during the year and having that guide your book selection.


message 24: by Kiah (new)

Kiah Swanson | 18 comments Reflecting on how I have found books so far, I have used a variety of methods and resources. Honestly, a common method I have used is to Google a certain type of book or a specific genre. This remains a great jumping off point. The searches pull up Goodreads lists, award lists, top choices lists, it even pulls up options from Pinterest.

I also have good luck finding books from the suggestions that Goodreads offers. I follow a trail of books that are usually quite high quality. These suggestions often offer many award winning books. I also love stealing from other teachers in this class. Teachers often provide books that are quite relevant for classroom use.

Typically, I look for books to read after I have already compiled my list of titles to locate. Recently, I went to the library and just wandered. I picked up many of the books that the library had chosen to display. This is where I found the book Lost and Found, which might be my favorite book I have found so far.

I also use an application called Overdrive. This application plays audiobooks that you check out from your library. It lists book suggestions for all ages and genres. I have started using its recommendations for juvinile fiction to help supplement my book findings as well.

I want to continue to expand my methods of finding books, so I will start using School Library Journal, Kirkus, and Horn Book as resources for expanding my book searches. I intend to continue using the variety of sources I am already using in addition to these new sources. With all of these options, I hope to maintain a constant flow of books and a constant desire to continue finding more high quality books.


message 25: by Sierra (new)

Sierra Bitsie | 19 comments Like some others have mentioned, my resources for finding books in the first half of this class were primarily through local libraries and bookstores. I've also been using this class as an opportunity to take a deeper look at my own classroom library. I enjoy the list feature on Goodreads because it gives a variety of titles in a certain genre or topic and I've also referred to lists from other websites, such as Pinterest or teacher's blogs. The mentor list that we created in the writing class will be a huge help to me in collecting books that serve a specific purpose.

I have not used Prospector or ILL to get books that are not available locally, but that's primarily because I haven't found a book that I really wanted but couldn't get from a local library. As I add more books to my Wishlist, I anticipate that these resources will be wildly helpful when I do come across a time where I can't find a certain book in my area.

Something that I have added to my tool belt is the community of teachers on Goodreads. I am being exposed to more titles that other people in this class are reading. This gives me book ideas that I don't have to investigate as much on my own because they come from a community of educators.

I plan on using the list of authentic folklore books provided by Eliot Singer as I purge my collection of "fakelore" in exchange for more authentic cultural texts. Academic resources like this are wildly helpful because the people who created them have already done all of the research!


message 26: by Erin (new)

Erin Ewing | 18 comments Katie wrote: "After reflecting on my book finding in the past, I have to say that I started out using themed weeks such as past read-alouds, folk/fairy tales, adult fiction, and picture books. It was a nice way ..."

Katie,

It is so great that you heavily use your school library and very disappointing that you are one of few. I can see that happening actually, and will make it a point next year to become BFFs with my librarian!! :) Hopefully she will become a BFF that will take my book recommendations into serious purchase consideration!

I feel your pain about the EDRD shelf becoming unruly. I have created separate shelves for different genres that I am finding. I am adding all my new books to that specific shelf and also to my main EDRD shelf and linking both in my post. This is helping me stay organized and hopefully benefit me as I look back into my shelves for ideas next year.


message 27: by Lauren (new)

Lauren Crouse | 13 comments Kiah said "I also use an application called Overdrive. This application plays audiobooks that you check out from your library."

I have used Overdrive before for my own personal books to read. I never thought about using it for this assignment. That is a wonderful idea! Thank you for sharing.


message 28: by Maddie (new)

Maddie Shell | 13 comments Kiah,

You definitely make me want to try Overdrive as well! I am such an auditory person, and I love listening to stories. What a great way to be able to read and also be able to do things around the house. Thanks for sharing!


message 29: by Maddie (new)

Maddie Shell | 13 comments Sierra,

I so agree that the best resource is using the other teachers in this cohort with us. I love looking at what they are reading and stealing their ideas. I hope that we can all continue to share books with each other throughout the remainder of this program!


message 30: by Monica (new)

Monica Ver Meer | 13 comments Allison wrote: "In looking back at my survey and reflecting on my flow of book finding, I'm so pleased that I've discovered some great sources that I will continue to use in both my personal and professional life...."

Allison,
I am always looking for ways to acquire new books (without draining my bank account) and I happened to come across the ad for the Library sale just this morning! I am not sure what their selection or pricing is like but it is worth a try right? I will definitely be going!
The sale is on July 22-24 at the Harmony Library location. There is more information on their website if you are interested :)
Good luck on your book search!


message 31: by Lesley (new)

Lesley | 24 comments The bookfinding survey made me see that I’m slowly expanding my resources. Prior to this class, I mainly found new children's books through Scholastic and libraries, both school and public. I have a great relationship with my school media specialist, and she has been an ongoing source for amazing new books. I found some helpful, topic-specific lists on Pinterest as well. I found new books for myself by asking friends who like similar sorts of books. I encouraged students to find books in similar ways. Each month, I’d put the Scholastic order form under the document camera and we’d look at it together. I’d circle books that kids were excited about and then see what I could get with bonus points. I encouraged kids to recommend books to each other and to seek out recommendations when they needed new books.
I plan to continue shopping Scholastic with my kids. I plan to continue encouraging them to recommend books to classmates and to seek recommendations from classmates. However, these methods focus primarily on popular books, which aren’t necessarily quality books. Lists on Goodreads have helped me broaden my search. Being friends on Goodreads with people from this class has also been helpful. I’m thinking about ways to use Goodreads with my class.
I had never looked at SLJ and The Horn Book before. What great resources! I need to explore further because I’ve barely scratched the surface. I need to develop relationships with librarians at the public library as well.
I’m interested, too, in finding sources for author studies. I’ve focused books by favorite authors in the past, but our writing class helped me see the need to specifically highlight the authors who create the books that we love. While working on the picture book analysis project for this class, I came across this website http://www.fcps.edu/fairfaxnetwork/mt..., which has lots of interviews with authors of books for children and young adults. I know there are more sources out there that I’d like to investigate.
And then there’s the never-ending funding issue. Scholastic bonus points are great, but the selection is limited. Goodwill and ARC have great prices, but they rarely have titles that are new to me. I’m anxious to find new ways to get new books without spending a small fortune.


message 32: by Lesley (new)

Lesley | 24 comments Monica wrote: "The sale is on July 22-24 at the Harmony Library location. There is more information on their website if you are interested :) "

Thank you for sharing!


message 33: by Lesley (new)

Lesley | 24 comments Maddie wrote: "Sierra,

I so agree that the best resource is using the other teachers in this cohort with us. I love looking at what they are reading and stealing their ideas. I hope that we can all continue to s..."


I agree! Sharing ideas with other teachers is one of my favorite things.


message 34: by Allison (new)

Allison Pearse | 24 comments Monica wrote: "Before this class I brought new books into my room primarily from our school library and from Scholastic book orders. I know that I have already greatly increased my search and that I will be bring..."

I love your idea of "humanizing" authors through author studies. There is such magic in discovering how an author's background has influenced his/her writing. Those biographies and autobiographies will make for a wonderful collection that you will be able to refer to year after year. Your post reminded me that I should spend more time looking into how authors' words are often shaped by their experiences.

Also, I like the idea of really digging into multiple titles from the same author. So often I'll have a student adore a book and ask me to point them toward other good books by the same author... and I'm useless. I am going to use your idea of immersing myself in the works of an author so that I can keep students' reading momentum going.

Have you read "Boy" by Roald Dahl? It's a great way to introduce students into the background of an author. Check it out:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6...


message 35: by Allison (new)

Allison Pearse | 24 comments Maddie wrote: "Kiah,

You definitely make me want to try Overdrive as well! I am such an auditory person, and I love listening to stories. What a great way to be able to read and also be able to do things around ..."


Overdrive is a wonderful resource for both digital and audio books. It has saved me from boredom on many long road trips! The public library also recommended an app called "Hoopla" for digital and audio books. I downloaded it, but I haven't really played with it yet. It's worth looking into.


message 36: by Allison (new)

Allison Pearse | 24 comments Rebecca wrote: "Finding a variety of books that appeal to a diverse community is never simple. My first few weeks of book finding focused on picture books and I utilized several familiar book finding strategies in..."

Your time at the ALA conference sounds wonderful! I'm so glad that it reignited your interest in knowing the "story behind the story" of why or how an author created a text.

I latched onto what you said in your post about how finding a variety of books for a diverse community is not simple. I feel that I'm plagued with this every year. I spend a lot of time making sure that the pieces I choose to share with my class show an array of ideas, attitudes, points of view, etc. I always figure that the more mentor texts I provide, the more opportunities I allow for students to find an idea or writing style with which they connect. With all of my new-found sources of book finding, I'm hoping that it will be second nature for me during the upcoming school year to be able to continue to expand my selection of mentor texts so as to draw in more students.


message 37: by Erin (new)

Erin Ewing | 18 comments Megan wrote: "In addition to suggestions from Goodreads, I have been searching all of the titles that won awards over the past few years and then have purchased some used books online using AbeBooks. I also have..."

It seems pretty clear from almost all of our posts that easy access to books is a very common theme. Yet we do realize how important it is for us to use book lists and each other for book recommendations. I am really grateful to have you all as go-to girls when it comes to all things reading and literacy. Thanks, Monica, for the recommendation about the Harmony Library sale. I will definitely be there. The article on the 15 ways to affordably access books for kids was also a great resource for me. I am undoubtedly behind the times in the book acquiring game!


message 38: by Erin (new)

Erin Ewing | 18 comments Lesley wrote: "The bookfinding survey made me see that I’m slowly expanding my resources. Prior to this class, I mainly found new children's books through Scholastic and libraries, both school and public. I have ..."

Thanks for the link to the author talk webcasts. That looks like a really great resource! I especially liked the on demand link to webcasts that were previously aired. Helps me to keep the author study fresh in my mind because after reading More About the Authors I believe the author study is a great way to light the spark in young readers.


message 39: by Kiah (new)

Kiah Swanson | 18 comments Danielle wrote: "Before this class my book finding typically consisted of pinterest, friends/colleague recommendations, and what I would find in my frequent perusals of Barnes & Noble. These have all been great res..."

I agree with you that utilizing other teachers has been one of the most powerful tools I have found so far. As many others have said, there are many books that I find and want to read, but do not have the time to read. When we find so many books each week, we cannot possibly keep up with reading all of them. This is when relying on other teachers and colleagues is key in finding which books are worth focusing our energy on.


message 40: by Kiah (new)

Kiah Swanson | 18 comments Sierra wrote: "Like some others have mentioned, my resources for finding books in the first half of this class were primarily through local libraries and bookstores. I've also been using this class as an opportun..."

Sierra, you and a few others have mentioned using teacher blogs. I would be very interested in starting to utilize these blogs for my book findings. Do you have any blogs in particular that you would recommend?


message 41: by Jenna (new)

Jenna | 16 comments Kiah wrote: "Reflecting on how I have found books so far, I have used a variety of methods and resources. Honestly, a common method I have used is to Google a certain type of book or a specific genre. This rema..."
Google can come up with some great resources! Using pinterest is a great idea that I have not really thought of. I also loved your Overdrive idea. Do you have to buy the books? This would be great in a classroom if you had access to multiple tablets or iPads.


message 42: by Jenna (new)

Jenna | 16 comments Sierra wrote: "Like some others have mentioned, my resources for finding books in the first half of this class were primarily through local libraries and bookstores. I've also been using this class as an opportun..."
Sierra I am also really excited about the mentor text list that was compiled for us. I have already started using it to drive my book findings. I think that will become a valuable tool that I will use over and over again this coming year!


message 43: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca S | 13 comments As I've been reading through all the comments, I've been adding several new book finding methods to my list. One in particular is getting recommendations from the teens that I am working with. My basic plan is to just ask them what they have read lately that they really enjoyed, but I'm sure there are other ways of getting book suggestions from students. I recently found out that the public library allows children and teens to do something similar to staff picks. They also allow some teens to write book reviews that are posted on the library website. Does anyone else have ideas of how to get book recommendations from their students?


message 44: by Bri (new)

Bri Schupp | 14 comments Monica wrote: "Allison wrote: "In looking back at my survey and reflecting on my flow of book finding, I'm so pleased that I've discovered some great sources that I will continue to use in both my personal and pr..."

Thanks Monica for passing the library sale along!! And, someone mentioned scholastic has a semi-annual sale in a local hotel. Does anyone know when this is taking place?


message 45: by Annie (new)

Annie | 15 comments Sierra wrote: "Like some others have mentioned, my resources for finding books in the first half of this class were primarily through local libraries and bookstores. I've also been using this class as an opportun..."

I agree with you about using other teachers as a tool! It has helped so much by having all these titles and input given to us! I think I need to branch out my resources and how to find books! Thanks for the input!


message 46: by Annie (new)

Annie | 15 comments Kiah said "I also use an application called Overdrive. This application plays audiobooks that you check out from your library."

Kiah,
That is an awesome idea! I didn't of that and I am really excited to try it! Thanks for the idea!


message 47: by Lanae (new)

Lanae Zaragoza | 14 comments Monica wrote: "Before this class I brought new books into my room primarily from our school library and from Scholastic book orders. I know that I have already greatly increased my search and that I will be bring..."

Monica,
I also mainly brought new books into my room from Scholastic book orders and the school library. I did not realize how many other resource there were! I also had not looked into SLJ or Horn Books before this unit. I have browsed through those resources and found great books and reviews. I am looking forward to continuing this work through out the school year as well to expose my students to a great amount of books.


message 48: by Lanae (new)

Lanae Zaragoza | 14 comments Sierra wrote: "Like some others have mentioned, my resources for finding books in the first half of this class were primarily through local libraries and bookstores. I've also been using this class as an opportun..."

Sierra,
I think it is great that you have been using this class as an opportunity to look at your own classroom library. I have just now began to think about my classroom library and will be going through books as soon as possible. I have not looked into the community of teachers on Goodreads, besides those in our class. I would love to be a part of that to gather titles from educators. Thanks for the great ideas!


message 49: by KBirdsall (new)

KBirdsall | 14 comments Sierra wrote: "Like some others have mentioned, my resources for finding books in the first half of this class were primarily through local libraries and bookstores. I've also been using this class as an opportun..."

Sierra,
I have also really found the Goodreads lists so useful! I like that they have reviews and stars as well, because then I can not only tell that they belong in a particular genre, but also whether fellow readers would recommend it. The one thing I really wish Goodreads had was age suggestions. I know that this is more subjective, but as a middle school teacher in a conservative area, I need to be careful what types of books I put on my shelves. I do not want to get a angry parent coming after me!


message 50: by Sierra (new)

Sierra Bitsie | 19 comments Chelsea wrote: "For the most part, I have turned to lists on Goodreads as a springboard for my book findings. I will find a few lists, look through the reviews, and then make my own list of books I want to check o..."

Chelsea,

I also find it difficult to find time during my week to go to the library and browse for books. Part of my plan for the upcoming school year is to have a basket of library books in my classroom that will change every few weeks. This way I can keep my collection current and meet my students' interests. I plan on using book lists that I have found on Goodreads and the list we created in the writing class to help me select books. If I already have these resources then I can easily go on the library website to put books on hold and then go to pick them up all at once!


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