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Archives > 8. Discuss Levin's dreams verses his reality.

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message 1: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 4209 comments Mod
Why does Levin continually imagine his future in such detail, only to have his actual experience differ from what he had expected?


message 2: by Patrick (new)

Patrick Robitaille | 976 comments Because, before his marriage, he was seeing everything on the basis of his education and interests (e.g. philosophy), from a very rigorous rational point of view. He had his epiphany when he spoke to the moujik who told him (my translation from the French edition): "One must not live for oneself; one must live for God", which Levin interpreted as: "One must love, not reason." From that point on, he gradually decided to let things (and himself) live; he finally found the meaning of (his) life.


message 3: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 4209 comments Mod
Good point, I would add that balance, a little living from the heart and reason is probably the right mix.


message 4: by Becky Lynn (new)

Becky Lynn Patrick wrote: "Because, before his marriage, he was seeing everything on the basis of his education and interests (e.g. philosophy), from a very rigorous rational point of view. He had his epiphany when he spoke ..."

I agree. It showed that ultimately God was in control of Levin's future and the more Levin tried to interfere and take control the more frustrated and aimless be became.

This was my favorite part of the book and thought it was a great ending, by the way.


message 5: by John (new)

John Seymour Becky wrote: "Patrick wrote: "Because, before his marriage, he was seeing everything on the basis of his education and interests (e.g. philosophy), from a very rigorous rational point of view. He had his epiphan..."

Likewise.


message 6: by Pip (new)

Pip | 1451 comments One of my favourite parts of the book was when Levin was farming and thinking about the position of the serfs, who were dealing with relatively recent emancipation. He had an idealised view of their lives which was continually rubbing up against the reality. I loved the description of him scything the wheat. He admired the physical economy of the peasants and tried to learn as much as he could from them but he was simultaneously frustrated by their obstinancy about traditional methods and suspicion of new ideas and technology. So he was always finding reality contradicting his ideas.


message 7: by Book (new)

Book Wormy | 2065 comments Mod
I really liked that bit to Pip his dreams of becoming a peasant and living a simple life and then he sees Kitty again and bang there goes that idea.

Levin also observes that he loves the unexpected things that come from marriage being different from what he had anticipated.


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