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Archives > 6. "everything was beginning to go double in her soul" (p. 288)?

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message 1: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 4209 comments Mod
After telling her husband about her affair, why does Anna feel that "everything was beginning to go double in her soul" (p. 288)?


message 2: by John (new)

John Seymour I can't find that quote in my edition - it doesn't seem to be on that page. Perhaps a Chapter reference might help.


message 3: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 4209 comments Mod
No, I can't find it either as I did not read on a kindle, the audio I read is a different translation than the book I have. But googled, reveals, Chapter XV, Part III.

"She was not simply miserable, she began to feel alarm at the new spiritual condition, never experienced before, in which she found herself. She felt as though everything were beginning to be double in her soul, just as objects sometimes appear double to over-tired eyes. She hardly knew at times what it was she feared, and what she hoped for. Whether she feared or desired what had happened, or what was going to happen, and exactly what she longed for, she could not have said.'

Does it allude to having mixed emotions regarding right and wrongs of her choices?


message 4: by John (new)

John Seymour Kristel wrote: "No, I can't find it either as I did not read on a kindle, the audio I read is a different translation than the book I have. But googled, reveals, Chapter XV, Part III.

"She was not simply miserab..."


Huh. Okay, but I still don't know why that passage itself is so significant. Why not the last three sentence on the bottom of page 456? (I have no idea what they are - I'm just being random as this question seems to be, somewhat.)


message 5: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 4209 comments Mod
Okay, point taken.


message 6: by John (new)

John Seymour Kristel, that's not intended to be a criticism of you at all. Believe me, I know how hard it is pulling together the questions. I'm just puzzled at why your source thought this was particularly noteworthy passage.


message 7: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 4209 comments Mod
I know, I remember thinking that questions would be easy to find for this book but they were not and I wasn't impressed with them either.

When I read it for the second time which I am glad that I did, I found while not liking Anna the book covered so much and the characters so well developed and the subjects so varied that it was hard to write a review, maybe it is equally hard to write questions.


message 8: by John (new)

John Seymour Yes, I shouldn't be too critical. I know I hate it when I have to come up with questions. But one would think that in 150 years someone would have come up with decent discussion questions for the book.


message 9: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 4209 comments Mod
A lot took the feminist approach with the book. I didn't want to, maybe that was a mistake.


message 10: by John (new)

John Seymour Oh goodness no, that was a good decision.


message 11: by Patrick (new)

Patrick Robitaille | 976 comments I guess the answer that question comes in the paragraph before this one, where Anna considered seeking help from religion just as foolish as seeking help from Karenin directly. She was basically torn between the "nicer" feelings of her situation with Vronsky and the teachings of her faith.


message 12: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 4209 comments Mod
I agree Patrick, and that really captures the whole. When we fall into things it is because we choose to ignore or avoid the one and turn more toward what is pleasurable at the time.


message 13: by Becky Lynn (new)

Becky Lynn Kristel wrote: "No, I can't find it either as I did not read on a kindle, the audio I read is a different translation than the book I have. But googled, reveals, Chapter XV, Part III.

"She was not simply miserab..."


I think this was a great quote/question. And yes, I do believe she was wrestling with mixed emotions and at this point realized she ultimately had a choice to make. She couldn't honor her vow to her husband and her family and at the same time have her relationship with Vronsky. And so she was torn between the two.

On a side note: Thank you, Kristel, for steering clear of the feminist-leaning questions.


message 14: by Pip (new)

Pip | 1451 comments I have found the quote and the text goes on to explain that she could not tell what it was she feared and what she hoped for. She had confessed to her husband the night before and had thought that being honest was the right course. But in the light of day she could not decide whether she feared or desired to continue her relationship with Vronsky. She felt her position hopeless and began to think of the disgrace she would face when she had not thought of it before. She was also ambivalent about what she thought her husband would do, therefore the feelings of her soul being doubled just like double vision is an apt on.


message 15: by Book (new)

Book Wormy | 2065 comments Mod
I agree it refers to the fact that she has a choice and cannot decide which is the right decision


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