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2001: A Space Odyssey
This topic is about 2001
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Monthly Read: Themed > July 2016-First Contact-2001:A space odyssey

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message 1: by Maggie, space cruisin' for a bruisin' (new) - rated it 4 stars

Maggie K | 1282 comments Mod
Welcome to July! It is Independence Day weekend here in the States, but I am excited to get going with this classic book!

Please chime in any opinions.....


message 2: by Don (last edited Jul 26, 2016 10:31PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Don DeBon (dondebon) | 11 comments One of the things I always found fascinating about this book is the movie actually preceded the book. As a result the book and movie go together very well, unlike many films that are developed from books. Another interesting aspect is while the novel came out after film, they were developed simultaneously. But as you would expect the book has much more detail. For example it goes into what the AE35 unit is and why it is needed. Granted we didn't need to know, but wondered. That is one of the many examples.

I also think you get a better feel of Hal from the book, not to mention what happens to Boman at the end. In the movie it all visual and you don't get a real sense of what happened. Years ago, that is why I bought the book, to read about the ending. And while there are differences, I still think they are a lot closer than most movie-to-book adaptations. I loved the film for the realistic space visuals, but the book for the real story.


message 3: by Maggie, space cruisin' for a bruisin' (new) - rated it 4 stars

Maggie K | 1282 comments Mod
I am really loving this book a lot more than I thought I would. The atmosphere seems so palpable....and Dave's character so alone. Cant wait to read the ending...(I never quite understood it in the movie)


Stuart Ridgway This was my introduction to SciFi at the age of 10. Totally absorbed by the detail and scope of the book and the fact that the last 10-15 pages were missing so I had to visit the SciFi section of the book shop... Never looked back.


message 5: by Mark (new)

Mark Werner | 10 comments As I understand it, Kubric and Clarke had "differences" about the film, and Clarke wrote his novelization to give his side of what was going on.

It still holds up as an excellent film, one of the very first "real" science-fiction films. I remember seeing it the year it came out... I had just gotten out of the army and it was quite an experience.


William Burcher | 2 comments Mark wrote: "As I understand it, Kubric and Clarke had "differences" about the film, and Clarke wrote his novelization to give his side of what was going on.

I'm a follower of Kubrick's. Although clearly possessing a spark of genius, the guy frequently had differences with many people. I read where Shelley Duvall needed counseling and therapy after the filming of "The Shining" as a result of the stress Kubrick put her (and the other actors) under. I think it's amazing that these two very strong, very smart figures managed to collaborate artistically at all.

I don't know anything about his personality (which, considering the breadth of his mind, was likely to be complex), but in my mind I see Clarke as a more easy-going, affable old fellow unrestrained by the hard, practical realities of filmmaking; able to spend his days diving in Sri Lanka, or on the beach there watching the clouds—thinking, always thinking.


Lena The Kubrick ending was beautiful and iconic but in reading the book I understood what happened.


message 8: by Krazykiwi (last edited Jul 26, 2016 07:33AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Krazykiwi | 10 comments The audiobook of 2001, read by Clarke, does clarify this somewhat, as there's a pretty interesting foreword from the author that explains how it came to be written. Bearing in mind it's a while since I listened to it, while Clarke and Kubrick wrote the basic outline of the story together and the first drafts of the screenplay. Then they separated and while Kubrick made the movie Clarke wrote the novel, aiming for the same deadline (although not quite making it, but close). Most of the differences came about simply because while they were working off the same outline, they were both really busy and not in close contact.

It didn't sound like there was any animosity, and notably Clarke altered the sequels to follow the movie more closely (which planet was used for the slingshot manoeuvre for instance.)

Overall, I agree with Lena. I love the movie, it's a masterpiece and it's gloriously beautiful even now. But I understood the book a lot better!


message 9: by Don (last edited Jul 27, 2016 09:03AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Don DeBon (dondebon) | 11 comments Krazykiwi wrote: "The audiobook of 2001, read by Clarke, does clarify this somewhat, as there's a pretty interesting foreword from the author that explains how it came to be written. Bearing in mind it's a while sin..."

Lena wrote: "The Kubrick ending was beautiful and iconic but in reading the book I understood what happened."

Interesting about that audiobook version, I might have to look that up. I didn't know he lent his voice to his own books. And I agree I don't think there was any animosity between the two, or at least I never ran across any evidence of it. And I think we would have heard, Clark kept a daily journal during his work on 2001. Ran across a lot of it here: http://www.cinephiliabeyond.org/arthu...

I rewatched the movie recently and I agree it holds up well. I think the main reason for this is they tried to be as "realistic" as possible with regard to how spaceflight is really done. I think the only part that appears dated is the "video phone" and only because of the company name on the phone booth. The story itself is good but shallow. However, you can't beat the visual eye candy.


message 10: by Lena (last edited Jul 26, 2016 11:02PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lena It does hold up Don. I liked both movies very much even though they were substantially different. Childhood favorites. I do remember laughing when I saw them wearing Keds in space. In the future we all wear keds and all restaurants are Taco Bell. :) Well, at least it would be comfortable. The shoes, not the tacos.


message 11: by Don (new) - rated it 4 stars

Don DeBon (dondebon) | 11 comments Lena wrote: "It does hold up Don. I liked both movies very much even though they were substantially different. Childhood favorites. I do remember laughing when I saw them wearing Keds in space. In the future we..."

Heh I missed the Keds. And Taco Bell ... little Demolition Man reference there ;) I like both films as well, but in the end I think 2010 is better than 2001 mainly because there is more story than visuals alone. 2010 is another great book, and one of my favorites.

Another note about Kubrick, last night I picked up a different edition of the book and found a IN MEMORIAM where Clark mentions that two weeks after he wrote the "Forward" for this edition, he learned of Kubrick's death. Clark notes how it was a great shock and while they had not spoken much, they remained "in friendly touch". Clark also copies a letter Kurbrick wrote to Clark apologizing for his inability to join Clark when he was honored on "This is your life". Further evidence there wasn't any animosity between the two.


message 12: by Lena (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lena Thank goodness you caught my reference Don. An hour after I wrote it I started realizing how crazy that sounded if you hadn't seen Demolition Man. It's good to know Clark and Kubrick were friendly.


message 13: by Don (new) - rated it 4 stars

Don DeBon (dondebon) | 11 comments Don wrote: "Lena wrote: "It does hold up Don. I liked both movies very much even though they were substantially different. Childhood favorites. I do remember laughing when I saw them wearing Keds in space. In ..."

Demolition Man is one of my favorite films actually. Way over the top but fun. And the some of lines Stalone has still crack me up: "What the heck happened? All of the sudden this car turned into a cannoli".


message 14: by Lena (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lena His comedic talents are woefully unappreciated. Oscar was some of his best work.


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