Pulp Magazine Authors and Literature Fans discussion

22 views
Miscellanous > Pulp Movies

Comments Showing 1-12 of 12 (12 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Michael (new)

Michael (dolphy76) | 21 comments The Kennel Murder Case with William Powell as Philo Vance was not too bad.
Lloyd Nolan starred in some Mike Shayne mysteries in the early Forties. I enjoyed them.
A great amount of Film Noir stuff is based on pulp or pulp type stories that appeared in serial form in many magazines. Too many to mention but Double Indemnity, Out of the Past, etc etc


message 2: by Michael (new)

Michael (dolphy76) | 21 comments There was also a series based on The Saint starring George Sanders that was quite good.
One on The Shadow which was quite bad and one based on The Spider which I never saw but looked kind of hokey and not at all like the character in the pulps.


message 3: by Michael (new)

Michael (dolphy76) | 21 comments If you liked Double Indemnity you may also check out "the Postman Always Rings Twice". Two versions. The one in the 1946 starred Lana Turner and John Garfield. The later 1981 version starred Jack Nicholson and Jessica Lange. Both are good. He also wrote Mildred Pierce. Best version starred Joan Crawford in 1945. Also I highly recommend stuff written by Jim Thompson. He was a brutal hard core writer. Movies based on his works were "the Killing" Sterling Hayden), The Grifters (John Cusak), the Getaway (Steve McQueen), The Killer inside Me (two versions).


message 4: by Henry (new)

Henry Brown (machinetrooper) | 8 comments Maltese Falcon, of course.

Not based on actual pulp stories, but inspired by them: The Rocketeer (comic adaptation, I know, but very pulpy) and the first couple Indiana Jones movies.


message 5: by Jim (last edited May 12, 2019 12:21PM) (new)

Jim  Davis | 4 comments I like to look for movies based on authors I especially like. The 1946 "Postman Always Rings Twice" was a very good adaptation of James M. Cain's novel. Another from Cain was the 1947 "Out of the Past" based on his novel "Build My Gallows High". Any film noir with Mitchum is always good.

Another noir author I really like was David Goodis. Several good films were made from his novels starting with 1947's "Dark Passage". You can't beat Bogart and Bacall in that one. Next you have 1957's "Nightfall". OK but not great. Next is one of my favorites, 1957's "Dark Passage". Loved the book and a terrific movie except I think Jayne Mansfield was miscast for her part. Although she had one of her better performances I was a little annoyed that the character was so completely different from the book.

I also agree wholeheartedly with Micheal's choice of films based on Jim Thompson novels. Thompson was another great, but relatively unknown today, noir writer of the 1950's and early 60's.


message 6: by Henry (new)

Henry Brown (machinetrooper) | 8 comments Must second "Dark Passage" with Bogie and Bacall. Great flick.


message 7: by Michael (new)

Michael (dolphy76) | 21 comments Jim wrote: "I like to look for movies based on authors I especially like. The 1946 "Postman Always Rings Twice" was a very good adaptation of James M. Cain's novel. Another from Cain was the 1947 "Out of the P..."

Cain, I believe had some hand in the screenplay but the novel was written by Geoffrey Homes (a pen name for David Mainwaring) who also had a hand in the screenplay. Geoffrey Homes got all the credit though. After that film he became a full time screenwriter and gave up fiction. More money in it. I believe Leigh Brackett would have done the same if she had the chance. She kept writing sci-fi even though she penned some great screenplays (The Big Sleep for one with William Faulkner).


message 8: by Bruce (new)

Bruce | 2 comments My favorite pulp based film is probably Murder, My Sweet, based on Farewell, My Lovely by Raymond Chandler. Very atmospheric and pulpy, both in terms of the narration and camerawork, and the "black pool" effects.


message 9: by Michael (new)

Michael (dolphy76) | 21 comments A.M. wrote: "My favorite pulp based film is probably Murder, My Sweet, based on Farewell, My Lovely by Raymond Chandler. Very atmospheric and pulpy, both in terms of the narration and camerawork, and the "black..."
I love that movie!


message 10: by Michael (new)

Michael (dolphy76) | 21 comments I think the quintessential Film Noir is "Out of the Past" with Robert Mitchum, Jane Greer, and Kirk Douglas. It had it all.....the detective (Mitchum) who falls for the femme fatale (Greer) girlfriend of gangster (Douglas) after being hired to find her. The Femme Fatale leads him down the path to hell and when he escapes he falls for the ingenue but before he can live happily ever after he is once more pulled into the web of the Gangster and Femme Fatale leading to the tragic ending. Every Noir device is in that movie and Mitchum's performance is as usual understated but powerful. Mitchum chews nails.


message 11: by Michael (new)

Michael (dolphy76) | 21 comments A.M. wrote: "My favorite pulp based film is probably Murder, My Sweet, based on Farewell, My Lovely by Raymond Chandler. Very atmospheric and pulpy, both in terms of the narration and camerawork, and the "black..."

"I had to do something really tough like putting on my pants." to paraphrase a great line in that movie. :)


message 12: by Michael (new)

Michael (dolphy76) | 21 comments Michael wrote: "I think the quintessential Film Noir is "Out of the Past" with Robert Mitchum, Jane Greer, and Kirk Douglas. It had it all.....the detective (Mitchum) who falls for the femme fatale (Greer) girlfri..."

Some great quotes from the film:
Whit is Douglas and Jeff is Mitchum...

Whit: I just want her back. When you see her, you'll understand better.
Jeff: Maybe she's just an impulsive girl?
Whit: So we'll let it go at that.
Jeff: I can let it all go.
Whit: Even $5,000 now, and 5 when you bring her back...and expenses.
Jeff: Now that should have been the first thing you said.
Whit: Find her Jeff. Bring her back.
Jeff: Why me?
Whit: Well, I know a lot of smart guys and a few honest ones. And you're both.
Jeff: And what happens to her?
Whit: I won't touch her.

When Jeff (Mitchum) he first sees Kathie (Greer) in Acapulco:
And then I saw her, coming out of the sun, and I knew why Whit didn't care about that forty grand.

Jeff: I didn't know you were so small.
Kathie: I'm taller than Napoleon.
Jeff: You're prettier too. [They kiss]
Kathie: Did you miss me?
Jeff: No more than I would miss my eyes.


Ann Miller (the ingenue): She can't be all bad. No one is.
Jeff Bailey: Well, she comes the closest.

Kathie Moffat: Don't you see you've only me to make deals with now?
Jeff Bailey: Build my gallows high, baby.

And the famous "Baby I don't care" quote:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=836c5...

Can you tell I love this movie?


back to top