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Predictions > 2016 Longlist Predictions [MBP]

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message 1: by Maxwell (new)

Maxwell (welldonebooks) | 375 comments Mod
As some of you may know, the 2016 Man Booker Prize longlist will be announced on July 27th.

I've created this thread for people to have some fun making predictions about what may be longlisted.

Doug has kindly drawn my attention to this list of books that are eligible: https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/9...

Have fun!

Max


message 2: by Doug (last edited Jun 20, 2016 11:01PM) (new)

Doug | 77 comments From this list, I have already read 12 of them: Slade House, What Belongs to You, City on Fire, Mothering Sunday, Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of a Fist, Why We Came to the City, The Association of Small Bombs, Eileen, Tuesday Nights in 1980, The Girl in the Red Coat and Tender. Of these, I would like to see the first six make the list, and think those all DO have a decent chance of making it. I don't think the second group of six are worthy OR stand much of a chance - but I certainly could be proven wrong!

Of those I haven't yet read, I'd somewhat like to see these make it, since they are already on my TBR list, so that would give me a good incentive to get around to them: The High Mountains of Portugal, The Course of Love, Shtum, The Cauliflower, Imagine Me Gone, Our Young Man, Selection Day, Lily and the Octopus, Autumn, Orphans of the Carnival, Beast, The Summer Guest, and Mr. Splitfoot.

That said, one of the joys of the Bookers for me is discovering works I haven't heard about and probably wouldn't read, unless they were on the list. Can't wait till the announcement! Happy Bookering!


message 3: by Britta (last edited Jun 20, 2016 12:31AM) (new)

Britta Böhler | 314 comments Mod
I am bad at predictions but I'll give it a try anyway. I think (mostly books I hope will make it, because I would like to read them in our bookclub):
ZeroK
Homegoing
City on Fire
Your Heart is a Muscle
Under the Udala Treees
Here I am
Forty Rooms
The Birds of Opulence
The Portable Veblen
My Name is Lucy Barton
Back to Moscow
Number 11


message 4: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments From the list, I have read nine: Slade House, The Noise of Time, The High Mountains of Portugal, City on Fire, Shylock is My Name, Thirteen Ways of Looking, Zero K, Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of A Fist, Why We Came to the City. I think there a quite a few other books that are eligible and that are not on the list (yet!). Of those I've read, I've rated most of them highly (4 or 5 stars), with the exception of The Noise of Time that I struggled with. I particularly liked The High Mountains... and Your Heart.... But, like Doug says, for me, one of the key things about Booker is that I get to read books I wouldn't otherwise have picked up, so I am hoping for a few on the list that I haven't heard of or wouldn't otherwise read.


message 5: by Robert (new)

Robert | 363 comments I try to think about previous booker lists so the only books, so maybe...

Homegoing - Yaa Gyasi (multi generations, criss cross narrative, tackles slavery)
Zero K - Don DeLillo ( millennial tension with few genre benders chucked in - I bet if this book was published in 2014 when A.C. Grayling was charing the Booker it would have been longlisted)
The Portable Veblen - Quirky, meta textual sort of book.
The Association of Small Bombs - Karan Mahajan. Political!!!
Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of a Fist - Political!!!!

Now the info is all from blurbs (although these are all on my neverending TBR) but they seem to be Booker material.


message 6: by Maxwell (last edited Jun 20, 2016 08:26AM) (new)

Maxwell (welldonebooks) | 375 comments Mod
Ok, I am terrible at predicting the longlist, which is fine because it means I'm always surprised and always find out about books I would've never heard of otherwise. But I'll take a shot at it based on that list (some I have read and some I haven't). Also I always sort of make two lists: those that I think will be listed, and those that I want to be listed. But for simplicity's sake, I'll just make one for now.

1. City on Fire- this would be one of those that I feel like would be longlisted because of popular opinion, but I don't think it's worthy
2. Shylock Is My Name- Jacobson (previous winner and nominee) could be listed for name's sake as well as an inventive re-telling, which I own and still need to read.
3. My Name Is Lucy Barton- lots of buzz- did it get snubbed for a Pulitzer?
4. The Gustav Sonata- this is a blind guess based on a fellow reviewer's high praise
5. Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist- again, lots of buzz; social/political commentary. And that title is great.
6. The Association of Small Bombs- I've read it! So secretly I hope it's listed because that's always fun. Also though it wasn't my favorite, I think it's worthy of recognition.
7. Under the Udala Trees- I've been hearing about this one since early 2015, and it sounds great.
8. Homegoing- I'd be shocked, from what I keep hearing, if this one doesn't get longlisted! I need it ASAP
9. Lily and the Octopus- all I know is that the cover has a dachshund and I love dachshunds. Sound reasoning.
10. Autumn- Ali Smith is a Booker favorite. Why not.
11. The Lesser Bohemians- McBride got high praise for her debut, so maybe her follow-up will get Booker prize recognition. It sounds fantastic.
12. The High Mountains of Portugal- haven't heard much about this, but Martel is also a previous winner so he could get the nom this year too. At this point it's all speculation on my part.

I have also read: Slade House, Thirteen Ways of Looking, and Here I Am. But I don't think any of them should be nominated. Slade House is fun and David Mitchell is a MB favorite, but this one doesn't seem like MB material to me. Same with Thirteen Ways of Looking. And I can sort of imagine Here I Am getting nominated because it's JSF's return after 11 years of no new novels, but honestly I wasn't that impressed by it. However, I can see the judges picking it because it deals with family conflict and political/historical conflict in Israel--and they live when authors draw those parallels, zooming in and out of the narrative which JSF does in this one.

Well, that was fun. Can't wait to see how wrong I am!


message 7: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments I sort of hope Autumn doesn't make it because it is not released in UK until 6 October so there wouldn't really be time to read it before the prize is given! But Ali Smith is a favourite of mine, so I also hope it does make it!


message 8: by Symone (new)

Symone (symonebooks) My longlist predictions in no particular order:

What Belongs to You by Garth Greenwell
My Name Is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout
Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist by Sunil Yapa
The Association of Small Bombs by Karan Mahajan
Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta
Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi
The Portable Veblen by Elizabeth Mckenzie
The Veins of the Ocean by Patricia Engel
The History of Great Things by Elizabeth Crane
Zero K by Don DeLillo
City on Fire by Garth Risk Hallberg
Slade House by David Mitchell


message 9: by Doug (last edited Jun 20, 2016 10:59PM) (new)

Doug | 77 comments I had posted a query as to whether Thirteen Ways of Looking, which is on the list and some have championed, is even eligible, and after some research, I doubt if it is (... so I deleted that initial post and am substituting this one). The eligibility rules say: " Every submitted NOVEL must be a unified and substantial work." McCann's work is a novella and three short stories, and I can't recall any other Booker nominations for a collection of stories (unlike the National Book Awards). I haven't read it, so maybe the judges will consider it as a unified whole, but if it doesn't make the list - that may be why!


message 10: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments I was wondering about that. I have read it and it definitely isn't a novel. It is very good, but not a novel. I can't see how it could qualify.


message 11: by Britta (new)

Britta Böhler | 314 comments Mod
Neil wrote: "I was wondering about that. I have read it and it definitely isn't a novel. It is very good, but not a novel. I can't see how it could qualify."

I am not sure you are right. In 1980 Alice Munro's short story collecton, The Beggar Maid, was shortlisted. It's the only time this happened, but still it seems it's possible. Or did they change the rules after 1980?


message 12: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments OK - interesting - I didn't know that. Maybe short story collections qualify.


message 13: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments I have looked at the rules and they definitely say entries must be novels. They include the statement "Every submitted novel must be a unified and substantial work." I am not sure how a collection of short stories qualifies, but maybe it does?


message 14: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 151 comments David Mitchell seems to be becoming the new Martin Amis, i.e. a writer whose name is always mentioned regardless of the quality of the new book, but one whose name is familiar to the bookmakers responsible for the odds. I second those of you who welcome surprises on the Booker lists - some of the best winners have been writers I had not heard of before they were shortlisted (though maybe I'm showing my ignorance).


message 15: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments I am a great fan of Mitchell's books and enjoyed Slade House. But I think it is maybe a bit lightweight for Booker?


message 16: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments By the way, when Mitchell was long listed, many of the bookmakers and press confused him with the British comedian of the same name which might explain something!


message 17: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 151 comments I should also mention that since I normally read new fiction when it comes out in paperback in the UK, as usual I have not read any of the contenders yet, but a new Ali Smith is always worth looking forward to.


message 18: by Robert (new)

Robert | 363 comments I agree Neil, plus I think Slade House really makes sense when put in the context of The Bone Clocks.

Luckily Hugh Mitchell is quite consistent. The only books I wasn't really crazy about were The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet (too normal imo) and Number9dream (a bit too convoluted for me)

Having been a booker fan since 2000 the short and longlists have always been full of surprises, that's what I like most about this award. Let's be honest, out of all our predictions maybe one will actually be on the list??


message 19: by Hugh (last edited Jun 21, 2016 01:54AM) (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 151 comments Sorry, this may turn into a bit of a lengthy aside of at most tangential relevance. I have read everything Mitchell has written except Slade House, but unlike the bookmakers, I was not at all surprised that the Bone Clocks failed to impress the Booker jury.

My favourite is still Ghostwritten, which I read a couple of years after it was published - I suspect Cloud Atlas would have shaded it if I'd read that first. After that Black Swan Green was very enjoyable particularly for those of us who are near contemporaries of Mitchell and British, but again possibly a bit lightweight for the Booker. I liked Jacob de Zoet, but felt it was let down a bit by the fantasy elements, and for me the Bone Clocks strayed too far into this territory, though there were sections in that which match his best writing. So I'm not convinced that any of these deserved to win (though one or two of the books that did are arguably no better).

The other consideration for the Booker is that the choice does depend on which of their books a publisher has submitted!


message 20: by Britta (new)

Britta Böhler | 314 comments Mod
Neil wrote: "I sort of hope Autumn doesn't make it because it is not released in UK until 6 October so there wouldn't really be time to read it before the prize is given! But Ali Smith is a favourite of mine, s..."

I think that the book is not eligible for this year's prize then. If I remember correctly the book must be published between 1 October 2015 and 30 September 2016.


message 21: by Neil (last edited Jun 21, 2016 05:29AM) (new)

Neil | 511 comments Britta wrote: "Neil wrote: "I sort of hope Autumn doesn't make it because it is not released in UK until 6 October so there wouldn't really be time to read it before the prize is given! But Ali Smith is a favouri..."

You're right! Next year's list then! I'd got it into my head that they just had to be released before the prize was announced, but it is definitely 30 September.


message 22: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments The Lost Time Accidents must also be eligible, I think. I enjoyed that book a lot, but I'm not sure it fits with what we've seen the judges pick over the last few years. This year's panel might not be so relentlessly depressing as last year's, though!


message 23: by Maxwell (new)

Maxwell (welldonebooks) | 375 comments Mod
Last year's selections were SO depressing! I'm hoping for a bit lighter reads this time around. But it is the Man Booker after all.

And I agree, Slade House is good but not particularly Booker material. But if we're going with lighter reads, then it would surely qualify.


message 24: by Maxwell (new)

Maxwell (welldonebooks) | 375 comments Mod
Britta wrote: "Neil wrote: "I was wondering about that. I have read it and it definitely isn't a novel. It is very good, but not a novel. I can't see how it could qualify."

I am not sure you are right. In 1980 A..."


If I'm not mistaken, The Beggar Maid is a collection all about one character--and it's widely viewed as a cross-over between short stories and a novel. Maybe that's their justification for including it.

Thirteen Ways of Looking is definitely not like that, so now I'm feeling like it's ineligible.


message 25: by Maxwell (new)

Maxwell (welldonebooks) | 375 comments Mod
Britta wrote: "Neil wrote: "I sort of hope Autumn doesn't make it because it is not released in UK until 6 October so there wouldn't really be time to read it before the prize is given! But Ali Smith is a favouri..."

Also Autumn is supposed to be released in August in the U.S. So I wonder if that's why it accidentally got put on the list.


message 26: by Robert (new)

Robert | 363 comments i quite enjoyed last year's selection (except for lila) i liked the fact that the majority of the books focused on the family or intense relations.


message 27: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments Amazon.com has Autumn (the book, not the season!) in Feb 2017 but I also thought I had seen an earlier release date somewhere.


message 28: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments Also, will it be re-titled as Fall for the US market? :-)


message 29: by Maxwell (new)

Maxwell (welldonebooks) | 375 comments Mod
Neil wrote: "Amazon.com has Autumn (the book, not the season!) in Feb 2017 but I also thought I had seen an earlier release date somewhere."

It must have changed. It was slated for a late summer/fall release here (along with Zadie Smith's new novel). And that's funny hah. I'm sure they will keep Autumn ;)


message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

Hi, all. Newbie here. What an interesting discussion. I can't begin to know what the committee will do. Truthfully, I haven't even been to their site lately to see who's on the committee, and I'm not sure it would mean much to me.

Of the list (which is great), many, many are on my want-to-read list, but I've only read (small-town, rural library, heavy on romance and fantasy) Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist, A Doubter's Almanac, and I've begun, but never got to finish Slade House, which I didn't think was up my alley, which I hate to say. Barkskins is on my couch waiting for me. The list always surprises me.

Of the couple I've read, the most astounding was Your Heart is a Muscle. Doubter's Almanac I certainly enjoyed, (view spoiler). It reminded me tremendously of some of Richard Powers's books, but not quite so, hmm, challenging, difficult, expansive, elusive? I love Powers.

What fun.


message 31: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments Quick question: does The Sympathizer qualify? As far as I can see it was written in English and published in UK in 2016? It is next on my reading list.


message 32: by Doug (new)

Doug | 77 comments Neil wrote: "Quick question: does The Sympathizer qualify? As far as I can see it was written in English and published in UK in 2016? It is next on my reading list."

It was published in both the UK (by Corsair) and the US (by Atlantic) in April 2015, so no, don't think it's eligible!


message 33: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments Ok - I was confused when I looked at Amazon which has the Corsair edition in UK with a publication date of April 2016.


message 34: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments I have just looked on the Corsair website and that also says April 2016 as the publication date. It is a bit confusing now!


message 35: by Beverly (new)

Beverly I am not sure how this matters/counts in the publication date.

It seems the ebook version of The Sympathizer was published in 2015 but the print version by Corsair was published in 2016.

The ebook rights could have been handled separately then the the print book rights.

Also I have been this happen with a UK published book that I want to read - I can get the ebook but the print book may be published in the US after the ebook.


message 36: by Doug (last edited Jun 24, 2016 12:08PM) (new)

Doug | 77 comments According to this, hardcover also published in UK by Corsair on April 2, 2015 (my birthday! :-)) :

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...

I think due to the Pulitzer win and subsequent publicity, it would be hard for the judges to ignore. Guess we'll know on July 27th!


message 37: by Toby (last edited Nov 27, 2016 10:53AM) (new)

Toby Finke (tobyf) | 32 comments 1. Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien
2. What Belongs To You by Garth Greenwell
3. The Noise of Time by Julian Barnes
4. The Lesser Bohemians by Eimear McBride
5. Hot Milk by Deborah Levy
6. Selection Day by Aravind Adiga
7. The Mandibles by Lionel Shriver
8. Nutshell by Ian McEwan
9. Addlands by Tom Bullough
10. The Maker of Swans by Paraic O'Donell
11. Autumn by Ali Smith
12. La Rose by Louise Erdrich
13. Eileen by Ottessa Moshfegh


message 38: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments I've opened up my kindle copy of The Sympathizer now. Despite the date on Amazon of 2016, it clearly says it was published in 2015, so is, I imagine, ineligible.


message 39: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) Neil wrote: "I've opened up my kindle copy of The Sympathizer now. Despite the date on Amazon of 2016, it clearly says it was published in 2015, so is, I imagine, ineligible."

Should be ineligible in my view for having a spelling mistake in the title! Needs to be translated for English-English readers, and that renders it eligible for the MBI not the main Booker.

One I haven't seen mentioned much on the thread - Hot Milk by Deborah Levy.


message 40: by Neil (new)

Neil | 511 comments Paul wrote: Should be ineligible in my view for having a spelling mistake in the title! Needs to be translated for English-English readers

I don't think I'll open up that can of worms!


message 41: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 151 comments I don't think we can blame the Americans for using an old English spelling! It would have been eligible last year but that is academic now. Incidentally the Marlon James was an unusual choice in that it was already available in UK paperback when the prize was awarded - there have been previous winners for which we've had to wait the best part of a year for that!
I've heard a lot of good things about Deborah Levy but haven't read any yet...


message 42: by Maxwell (new)

Maxwell (welldonebooks) | 375 comments Mod
Curious, has anyone read The Mandibles by Lionel Shriver? I've been seeing it everywhere lately, and it sounds like Man Booker material.


message 43: by Robert (new)

Robert | 363 comments today my local bookstore had a massive sale and i was THAT close to buying it. I opted for zero k and rush oh


message 44: by Britta (new)

Britta Böhler | 314 comments Mod
Yes, I read The Mandibles. I liked it,but dont think it's good enough to get nominated.


message 45: by Paula (new)

Paula | 131 comments Neil wrote: "Also, will it be re-titled as Fall for the US market? :-)"

Too funny, Neil. We Americans surely don't know what "Autumn" means. :-)


message 46: by Nishad (new)

Nishad (nishadtrivedi) | 4 comments Spelling mistake in The Sympathizer?


message 47: by Maxwell (new)

Maxwell (welldonebooks) | 375 comments Mod
Well, I finished HOMEGOING this weekend. And if it isn't nominated I will be so mad!


message 48: by Britta (new)

Britta Böhler | 314 comments Mod
Maxwell wrote: "Well, I finished HOMEGOING this weekend. And if it isn't nominated I will be so mad!"

You and me both!


message 49: by Robert (new)

Robert | 363 comments Argh it's on my TBR stack. However in a week's time I'll be starting A Doubter's Almanac and I'm quite excited about it


message 50: by Will (new)

Will | 5 comments Well, I would also love to see Homegoing listed, but its UK publication date shows as January 2017, which makes it ineligible for this year, doesn't it? Am I incorrect? Maybe next year?


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