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Breakfast of Champions
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1001 Monthly Group Read > June {2016} Discussion -- BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS by Kurt Vonnegut

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Charity (charityross) Join us in discussing our 100th Group Read -- Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut.


Nicola | 765 comments I'm enjoying it so far but it's not one I'm going to rave about I don't think.

It's quirky and clever but so far it hasn't gotten 'heavy' in the way that Slaughterhouse-Five did.


message 3: by Nadine (new) - added it

Nadine | 20 comments I enjoyed it a lot at the beginning, but after a while, some of the devices he used got on my nerve. Even if I had found them amusing at the beginning.
There is some very clever ideas, I love the sarcasm. Some gems that I wanted to keep in a citation collection. But the plot was not very interesting to me. Probably on purpose?
It is my first book by this author, and now that I know the characters were part of previous books, I wonder what my feeling would be if I had start with at the beginning?


Nicola | 765 comments Nadine wrote: "I enjoyed it a lot at the beginning, but after a while, some of the devices he used got on my nerve. Even if I had found them amusing at the beginning.
There is some very clever ideas, I love the ..."


Yes I feel the same way. I really liked the beginning and that kept me reading for nearly 2 thirds of the book. It was around then that I realised I'd fairly much lost interest.

I've only got 40 pages left to read now though so even if I'm now feeling rather bored it won't be that painful to wrap it up.


Laurence | 21 comments Nadine wrote: "I enjoyed it a lot at the beginning, but after a while, some of the devices he used got on my nerve. Even if I had found them amusing at the beginning.
There is some very clever ideas, I love the ..."


Exactly the same feeling here! At first, I also really liked the humour, but after a while the story just got a bit too "meta". I really loved the pictures though! (Especially the ones about the difference in beavers, haha)


Amanda Dawn | 169 comments I enjoyed this book thoroughly (hence the 4 star review), and particularly loved how everything was given a sterile but objectively true "alien observer" description in the book to draw points about classism, mental illness, ethnocentrism, "global development" and the like. I also was intrigued by Rabo Karabekian's views about biological function versus awareness and which has more relevance. I probably gave this book a higher review than its own merit warrants, but due to having read Slaughterhouse Five and God Bless You Mr. Rosewater first, I just loved all of the descriptions of Kilgore Trout's weird stories, and the Presence of Elliot Rosewater in the book (one of my favorite novel protagonists).

That's the thing with this book: I enjoyed the things in it I already liked in other Vonnegut stories to the point this book is almost just a supercut of Vonnegutisms. To me it was the equivalent of a pixar movie sequel that just panders to what you loved about its predecessors and you enjoy the ride too much to care (Oh, there's that other character and gag I loved from the other one! what's the plot of this one again? xD).


Mon67 | 20 comments I really enjoyed this book. I found it very funny and witty. Loved all the stories from Kilgore Trout's books and how they were published.
I think the author was looking back at the first part of his life. Turning 50 is a milestone, and Vonnegut wrote this book to connect with his legacy.
I liked this one more than Slaughterhouse-Five, I connected to it more.

I somehow agree with you, the first part is really cool and the second part is a bit self-referential, but overall it was a nice read and the end was touching.


Augusta I felt very similarly to others in that I really enjoyed the beginning of this book but then it just didn’t really go anywhere great. Vonnegut does warn the reader of this in the introduction, I remember reading something about this just being a mish mash of things on his mind and I think it reads like that. He touches on a huge number of really interesting themes; such as consumerism, mental illness, race, poverty, the environment, gender and it reads as an incredibly scathing take on American society.

The narrator is confused by the idiocy of people until he decides that people act the way they do to pretend they are in stories. “I decided to shun storytelling. I would write about life. Every person would be exactly as important as any other. All facts would be given equal weightiness. Nothing would be left out. Let others bring order to chaos.” I think this explains why Vonnegut does things like telling the reader about the greyhound whose shit is on the jacket of Trout, things that don’t seem to bear any relevance to the rest of the story.

Probably an odd choice for my first Vonnegut but I look forward to reading more of his work.


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