World, Writing, Wealth discussion

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message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13749 comments Sometimes there are reviews with seemingly good rating of 4 stars that contain 'killer' phrases that should clearly put people off from the book.
My own example of a 'killer' is a review ending with something like 'good not great'.
Do you have your examples?


message 2: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13749 comments What's a 'killer review' 4 u?


message 3: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13749 comments Excellent examples!


Roughseasinthemed | 129 comments As a reviewer I usually leave the 'too many errors' sort of comment until the end, and try and focus on the good aspects first. I think reviewers should try and be fair but I have been known to leave some acid reviews, only on my blog though :)


message 5: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13749 comments -:)


message 6: by Rae (new)

Rae Louise (raelouiseauthor) | 14 comments I find it irritating and slightly unfair when reviewers compare something to the wrong genre. I say this because I watched a horror movie a few days ago where people slated it for not having enough action or blood, but that wasn't the purpose of the movie. It was more psychological thriller than slasher. I understand that personal taste counts a lot in reviews, but completely trashing something for the wrong reasons seems like more of an attack just for the sake of it.


message 7: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9725 comments What annoys me is when a reviewer criticises the book for containing what the description said was in it. A reviewer should review the book as presented, not the book that the reviewer would have preferred. As an example, I had one review of a book that could best be summarised as "how they got out of chaos" and this wretched reviewer said I should have written about how they got into it. Well, perhaps, but they should review the book that was there.


message 8: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Ian wrote: "What annoys me is when a reviewer criticises the book for containing what the description said was in it. A reviewer should review the book as presented, not the book that the reviewer would have p..."

I dislike it when a reviewer writes a review on complete misunderstanding, passing it off as their own interpretation of the book.


message 9: by Daniel J. (new)

Daniel J. Nickolas (danieljnickolas) | 111 comments I enjoy and respect the work that goes (or should go) into book reviews; having attempted book reviews myself, I can appreciate how it is sometimes difficult to differentiate between what a book did for me personally and what it was attempting to do.

Most reviews seem to focus on whether or not the reviewer "related" to the narrative; while this is important, an equally -- and in my opinion far more -- important aspect of a review is how well the author accomplished what they were intending to accomplish. A few of my favorite books are ones with characters and stories I cannot relate to at all, but which are very well executed.

As Ian and Rae pointed out, it's unfair for a reviewer to analyze a book based of what it isn't; but this seems to be how the majority of current reviews operate.


message 10: by Alex (last edited Mar 31, 2017 08:28PM) (new)

Alex (asato) Besides the normal Killer phrases, some seemingly innocuous ones are:

"It was an okay read"
"I struggled with [blank] but managed to finish"
"The beginning was slow, but it picked up at... so don't give up"


message 11: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2151 comments Ian wrote: "What annoys me is when a reviewer criticises the book for containing what the description said was in it. A reviewer should review the book as presented, not the book that the reviewer would have p..."

I end up on that side of things as the reader...I'm only reading when it's warm enough to spend my nights outside, shifting to TV viewing from late fall to early summer; so I end up with a handful of books at the end of the summer that sit until next year. By the time I take them up again, I forget completely about the descriptions on the sales page and fall into that habit of placing my own assumptions when I take one up.


message 12: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9725 comments Interesting. I tend to read more in the winter, when being outside is much less fun. What about others?


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