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message 1: by Tim (new)

Tim I am not much in the field of speech skills, but I would like to help you out in the field of phrasing things if I can. Just to ask, what exactly will your speech and what language will it be in? :)


message 2: by Apoorva (new)

Apoorva Bhatnagar | 22 comments Mahima I can totally relate to your feeling.
It's only first 3 minutes that that this fright persists.I'll share some tips that I use while giving speech:

1)Before starting the speech repeat in your mind atleast four times " I am the best and I can do."
2) Don't overthink that audience know more than you.
3) Keep it partially formal and partially friendly.
4) Jot down your speech in points. Don't take whole written material with you as it forces you to peep into it.

All the best. Hope it helps.


message 3: by Mahima (new)

Mahima Pradhan Tim wrote: "I am not much in the field of speech skills, but I would like to help you out in the field of phrasing things if I can. Just to ask, what exactly will your speech and what language will it be in? :)"

Hi Tim, I have sent you a message to tell you about the speech. It will be in English.

Apoorva wrote: "Mahima I can totally relate to your feeling.
It's only first 3 minutes that that this fright persists.I'll share some tips that I use while giving speech:

1)Before starting the speech repeat in yo..."


I actually thought that one should keep the whole speech with themselves while going on stage. Now that you have said that it forces you to peep into it while speaking, I think that is really why I HAVE to steal a glance at the paper while speaking!

Anyway, many thanks to both of you! Hope it goes well. =-)


message 4: by Bunny (last edited Jun 17, 2016 11:09PM) (new)

Bunny Best of luck to you Mahima, one thing I find that helps me is to choose a person in one part of the audience to look at and speak directly to that person for a few sentences. Then choose another person in another place to look at and speak to them. It helps me if I speak to individual members of the audience as if I was telling them my story rather than trying to think about all the people and getting scared by there being so many. Maybe that won't work for you everyone is different but it helps me.


message 5: by Mahima (new)

Mahima Pradhan That is a good suggestion Bunny! I actually do look at my favourite teachers whenever I am on stage because they give accurate expressions when you need them the most. I would cut looking at my classmates because some of them (the jealous ones and the stupid ones) will show as if they are uninterested and the others, who are my friends will make faces at me and make me laugh! And that is something that should never happen when you are in front of hundreds of students and teachers....


message 6: by Christine (last edited Jun 20, 2016 04:29AM) (new)

Christine Periña | 67 comments Goodluck to you Mahima, I actually feel the same way when I delivered a speech a year ago in my school. Nervousness is there so Just be yourself and don't forget that the most important thing is your connection with the audiences. When you are delivering your speech make it as if you are just talking to them, look at them eye to eye so that you both can feel the emotion. Always be positive! the stage is yours .. :)


message 7: by Mahima (new)

Mahima Pradhan Thanks so much for that suggestion, Christine! Will definitely keep that in mind. :-)


message 8: by Bunny (new)

Bunny Oh I thought of another thing! Excitement and nervousness are really similar in fact a lot of the time they come together and/or it's actually possible to mistake one for the other. So when I get nervous I ask myself, am I really just nervous or am I also excited? Or maybe mostly excited?


message 9: by Ashwin (new)

Ashwin (ashiot) | 215 comments Bunny wrote: "Best of luck to you Mahima, one thing I find that helps me is to choose a person in one part of the audience to look at and speak directly to that person for a few sentences. Then choose another pe..."

Yep, I used to choose a person who is not paying attention so that even if I stumble don't get a reaction and I can go on like nothing happened. (I think Mahima thinks differently on this one!).

I'll second Apoorva. Keep flashcards with important points and once you are done with one, remove it from front and move to next.

Before being called to deliver the speech, hum a familiar tune - that helps with anxiety.

It helps to just take a few moments when you first stand behind the mic to gather your thoughts, you can absorb the atmosphere and start once you are comfortable.

All the best!


message 10: by Celtic (new)

Celtic (celtic_) | 6 comments Good advice from @NicolaSturgeon, the First Minister of Scotland: https://twitter.com/NicolaSturgeon/st...


message 11: by Ana, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Ana PF | 746 comments Mod
Hey, Mahima! Hopefully this will still be helpful. It's not like I've delivered a great deal of speeches, let alone now that I'm out of uni. However, I did interpret them (hope I will again!), and this is what I found worked best for me. Admittedly I am an exhibitionist, haha, but I did get nervous to and the feeling of responsibility was also very present.

1) To a certain extent and as long as you keep it controlled, anxiety is actually your ally. As in, it makes you stay alert and engaged.
2) Be yourself. Delivering your speech word by word is not only very difficult, but will also probably end up in you sounding like a record. I'm not saying you suddenly go all casual, but it's also no biggie if you forget A or B. Turn to your experiences as a student. Rely on previous speeches. Engage with your audience, whenever possible, just by being Mahima. :)
3) Maybe practise at home! Or, if it's possible at all, in the speech venue.
4) Do keep some small notes with you. That will come in handy. :) You might want to use drawings that can actually convey ideas to you, so that you don't have to read a whole sentence there but rather a mix of written word and symbols that will immediately turn into whatever you desired to say. For example, in interpreting we use a sitting dummy for 'casualties', a laying down dummy for 'dead', a line above a word to convey the idea of 'many' and a U upside down for the idea of 'summit', and many more symbols that actually vary from one interpreter to another.

Best of luck! Oh, and a question, out of curiosity. Are you perhaps Indian? Your name sounds a bit Indian to me, and I ask you because I would like to know whether speech as an exercise and cultivates genre among students is also popular in India. I have the impression it is, because your asking for help reminds me of a book I read where the Indian main female character was like a class leader or something and she delivered a daily morning speech to her fellow students, as well as guiding visitors through the school. We do not have such a tradition in the Spanish system and so I feel curious. I've seen Ashwin is here too, and I know a good explanation is coming from him as well, if he happens to check back and read this. :)


message 12: by Ana, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Ana PF | 746 comments Mod
*cultivated, haha. My sausage fingers mistyped the word and I'm on my iPad haha.


message 13: by Mahima (new)

Mahima Pradhan Ana wrote: "Hey, Mahima! Hopefully this will still be helpful. It's not like I've delivered a great deal of speeches, let alone now that I'm out of uni. However, I did interpret them (hope I will again!), and ..."

That was so kind of you Ana for writing so many tips. The idea of replacing words with drawings is something I would keep in mind! And yes, I am an Indian. Giving speeches and having debates is something that is common in almost all schools in India as the education system here tries to make students the best in all fields, be it academic, co-curricular or sports. Plus, it also focusses on inculcating moral excellence, values and righteousness in the students (if you might be thinking why am I speaking in such detail, our principal had given a speech on this in the morning, so I am saying the same things).


message 14: by Mahima (new)

Mahima Pradhan Ashwin wrote: "Bunny wrote: "Best of luck to you Mahima, one thing I find that helps me is to choose a person in one part of the audience to look at and speak directly to that person for a few sentences. Then cho..."

I actually used to look at the walls on the opposite side until I came to know that eye contact is one really important part of public speaking. But as I have said before, students either make me laugh or start doing distracting things, so it's better to look at the teachers while speaking.
To be honest, humming a tune just seconds before a public speech is not my piece of cake as my voice as my voice gets lost in the 'depths' of the voice box before coming back to normal.:-P


message 15: by S.L.J. (new)

S.L.J. (sammyslj) | 24 comments Whenever I hear someone giving a speech it automatically makes me think of the King's Speech (which by the way was given on the exact same day that my dad was born) and all difficulties that the king went through in order to deliver it to a country on the brink of war.

But that brilliant advise that Lobe gave Berty is still true today:

"Forget everything else, just say it to me, as a friend."


message 16: by Mahima (new)

Mahima Pradhan Celtic wrote: "Good advice from @NicolaSturgeon, the First Minister of Scotland: https://twitter.com/NicolaSturgeon/st..."

Will visit the website right away!


Bunny wrote: "Oh I thought of another thing! Excitement and nervousness are really similar in fact a lot of the time they come together and/or it's actually possible to mistake one for the other. So when I get n..."

That might be in my case as I am on top of the world when I get a part to speak (we have a tough competition in school for dialogues and speeches) but get tensed a few hours before D-Day.


message 17: by Mahima (new)

Mahima Pradhan So now, let me drop the bomb. I had my speech today in school and I didn't see messages starting from Ashwin's until now. The speech went really well and as we all know, the students weren't interested in it but the teachers were. Afterwards, I took feedback from teachers and the principal herself and they said that I have improved a lot in speeches.

Anyway, thank you all for your suggestions. Will definitely help me in the future. :-)

PS- I couldn't control the urge to tell you all this. I recently had gone to an event and we were supposed to write a report on that event. So, I got the 1st prize while competing with 500 students and got a trophy from The Times of India, the leading newspaper of India (call me childish for telling this but I don't care).


message 18: by Tim (new)

Tim Hi again Mahima. Glad to know your speech went well. trust me though, no amount of writing and speaking skills will get pupils ineterested in school speeches; my school career will be over next week and I've sat through enough speeches (of both teachers as well as pupils) to know.

Anyway, congratulations are in order for your 1st prize: out of 500 people no less. I hope you don't mind me asking but surely, they've written an article about it? I mean, a newspaper holding a contest and not mentioning it in their own newspapers sounds silly at best and disrespectful to you at worst. If they have, then I tip my hat to you once more (except I don't wear hats). Either way, I hope you'll get many more oppurtunities like this in the future. :)

PS: Ok, Ana, you should really teach me some linguistics. I know you can't just teach me a language overnight (even if you had the time), but being able to tell a name's origin, now that sounds very useful. I'm probably the worst student to have in any school, but I'm a big fan of learning things, and I think it would be nice for others as well, so that they'd meet someone who wouldn't estimate their origins wrong by a thousand miles or so.


message 19: by Mahima (new)

Mahima Pradhan Yes, they did write an article about it. In fact, they printed my report on the event too.


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