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Katherine of Aragón: The True Queen (Six Tudor Queens, #1)
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Group Reads > July 2016 - Katherine of Aragon: The True Queen, by Alison Weir

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Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1948 comments Katherine of Aragon, The True Queen, a new historical novel by Alison Weir, was the runaway winner of our poll for the July 2016 Group Read.

It should be available in hardback, digital, and audio editions, and at libraries and bookstores. (It came out May 31st of this year.)


Arwen | 52 comments I have already my copy and started it. Liking it so far! :)


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1948 comments That's great, Arwen.


Cindie | 10 comments I have read a lot of historical fiction and history about Katherine of Aragon, much of it written by Alison Weir. I am only on page 262, but am wondering: when their daughter Mary is finally born, she is referred to as "a true Tudor -- and a true Trastamara." What is a Trastamara? And regarding her sister Juana, locked up for years because she was "mad," -- was it ever discovered what the source of her alleged madness (i.e. schizophrenia, bipolar,) was? Or is she just remembered as a "hysterical woman?"


Laura | 20 comments Cindie wrote: "I have read a lot of historical fiction and history about Katherine of Aragon, much of it written by Alison Weir. I am only on page 262, but am wondering: when their daughter Mary is finally born, ..."

I think Trastamara was the family dynasty/name of the rulers of Spain.


Cindie | 10 comments Laura wrote: "Cindie wrote: "I have read a lot of historical fiction and history about Katherine of Aragon, much of it written by Alison Weir. I am only on page 262, but am wondering: when their daughter Mary is..."

thanks, Laura!!


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1948 comments Yes, Trastamara was the name of the royal house of both Isabella of Castille, and Ferdinand of Aragon, Catherine of Aragon's parents. (Their only son died without heir and the throne of Spain passed to the Hapsburgs, as one of their princes had married Catherine's older sister, Juana. This is how Juana's elder son, Charles V, came to inherit (only slightly exaggerating) half of Europe and a large portion of the Americas at the death of his grandfather, in 1516.)

Historians are still arguing over what was the actual problem with Juana "la Loca." Depression? Schizophrenia? Psychosis? Secretly a Protestant? (It can be very hard to diagnose historical figures with diseases - but it's also a lot of fun.)


Cindie | 10 comments Susanna - Censored by GoodReads wrote: "Yes, Trastamara was the name of the royal house of both Isabella of Castille, and Ferdinand of Aragon, Catherine of Aragon's parents. (Their only son died without heir and the throne of Spain passe..."

Thanks, Susanna! I always wonder what their actual diagnosis would have been, not to mention everyone's still births and miscarriages (although lack of antibiotics and no hand washing by doctors and midwives delivering babies probably accounts for the high mortality in both newborns and mothers...)


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1948 comments Yeah, the no hand-washing is a big one - the death rate for new mothers and babies dropped significantly after that practice became common (end of the 19th century, more or less).


happy (happyone) | 106 comments I just finished this one.

Meh - I thought the characters were flat and the writing a little boring. I did like the picture she drew of Katherine during the "King's Great Matter" and the strength of character Katherine showed.

I really haven't been too impressed with her last few novels. I coming to the conclusion that Ms. Weir is a much better historian than novelist.

3 stars.


happy (happyone) | 106 comments Susanna - Censored by GoodReads wrote: "Yeah, the no hand-washing is a big one - the death rate for new mothers and babies dropped significantly after that practice became common (end of the 19th century, more or less)."

Just a factiod, but I think it was in Mortimer's The Time Traveller's Guide to Medieval England: A Handbook for Visitors to the Fourteenth Century, that I read that 10% of mothers died of complications of child birth. Due to multiple pregnancies a woman/wife would have during her life, it almost certain a woman would die in childbirth


Fiona | 22 comments Katherine Of Aragon The true Queen by Alison Weir

I want to thank Alison Weir for this great book. I have always been interested in the Tudor period but as a lot of people I really identified with Anne Boleyn. This book however really makes you feel Katherines story from her point of view. I feel I got a great insight into her views and life. She put up with so much. Her marriage to Henry 8th started so well, he was so in love with her but gradually it went wrong finally Anne Boleyn finishing their marriage once and for all. Katherine lived for years being bullied by Henry, living under threat and possible poisoning the stress must have been terrible. The book is so well researched too I really did learn more despite having already read so much on this period. I felt genuinely sorry for Katherine and the terrible time she had and was sorry when the book ended. 5 *


message 13: by Mindy (new)

Mindy | 40 comments Yes, this was a fantastic book! I also felt sorry for Katherine, and, in some ways--which is a credit to Ms. Weir, for making Katherine come so alive--I also became so annoyed with her!


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