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Group Reads > August Read

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message 1: by Portia, Novice Mod (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
I's nearly the middle of the month of June. Whee.

Let's discuss whether we'd like fiction or non for our group read in August.

Let's also discuss if anyone wants to moderate the book they nominate ;-) It's not as hard as you may think. Otherwise, I wouldn't do it :P


message 2: by Ashwise (new)

Ashwise | 12 comments I'm game with fiction.


message 3: by RJay (new)

RJay (plantagenetjunkie) | 100 comments Mod
Group selected "Wars of the Roses: Stormbird" by Conn Iggulden.
It's historical fiction set during the reign of Henry VI - when he's about 22 years old. It begins with secret diplomatic plans for a long-term truce and marriage with Margaret of Anjou in return for French lands gained after Agincourt. Main characters so far are Derry, Suffolk, and the Duke of York. Personally, the portrayal of the Duke and Duchess of York is very slanted (negative) and portrays them as self-aggrandizing and heartless. How do others feel about the book so far?


message 4: by Ashwise (new)

Ashwise | 12 comments I love it, this is my second time reading it and I love how the author sucks you in with the writing and plot. I felt the author did a good job with the characters, including Margaret of Anjou she has a more sympathetic feeling than what Sharon Penman and Phillips Gregory had written. Good perspective on the Duke and Duchess of York, it makes you wonder how they were in real life.


message 5: by Joy (new)

Joy (thedragonlily) | 45 comments The Duke and Duchess raised a very close-knit, loving (mostly) family. I don't think they could have done so if they were as nasty as Iggulden portrays them.


message 6: by RJay (new)

RJay (plantagenetjunkie) | 100 comments Mod
I suspect there's a reason Iggulden has portrayed the Duke & Duchess of York as such mean-spirited people. I'm not far enough along in the tale to understand why this was necessary but I'll keep plugging along.


message 7: by Joy (new)

Joy (thedragonlily) | 45 comments Neither am I, and I have finished it. Maybe he's just pro-Lancaster.


message 8: by RJay (new)

RJay (plantagenetjunkie) | 100 comments Mod
Joy wrote: "Neither am I, and I have finished it. Maybe he's just pro-Lancaster."

Wow, very interesting. If anything seems logical to me once I finish, I'll be sure to comment.


message 9: by Joy (new)

Joy (thedragonlily) | 45 comments Well, it's the start of a series. The developments play out over several books. STORMBIRD gives a psychological foundation for Margaret of Anjou's obsession with smashing her enemies.


message 10: by Portia, Novice Mod (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
If anyone is interested in joining in as a co-moderator for this group, please let me know. The time has come for some new perspectives and other opinions. Other groups I belong to with multiple mods do really well.

So, volunteer here ;-)


message 11: by RJay (new)

RJay (plantagenetjunkie) | 100 comments Mod
Joy wrote: "Well, it's the start of a series. The developments play out over several books. STORMBIRD gives a psychological foundation for Margaret of Anjou's obsession with smashing her enemies."
Joy, it sounds like you've read multiple books in this series and your perspective is valuable. And your rationale, noted above, makes sense - a writer needs to reveal the inner motivation for a character's actions.


message 12: by Joy (new)

Joy (thedragonlily) | 45 comments Actually, I haven't read any farther in this particular series, but I have read quite a bit about this period of English history, and I've been an editor. It's clear that Iggulden is laying foundations - the question is, will his constructs be believable.


message 13: by RJay (new)

RJay (plantagenetjunkie) | 100 comments Mod
Joy wrote: "Actually, I haven't read any farther in this particular series, but I have read quite a bit about this period of English history, and I've been an editor. It's clear that Iggulden is laying foundat..."

Your perspective as an editor is really interesting; is it hard to read a book without using your editor skills? I've taken some writing classes and try not to "read" with a writer's eye - or I enjoy the book less.

I've made it through some additional chapters and am still annoyed with such a blatant bias against the Duke and Duchess of York. Anyone else want to join in this discussion?


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