Cedar Falls Public Library discussion

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summer

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message 1: by Zoe (new)

Zoe Pane | 12 comments What will we be reading this summer


message 2: by Sheryl (new)

Sheryl | 109 comments Mod
Good question! We library staff got a little derailed by our move to a different automation system. Anyone have any suggestions? I read a good travel book recently, Bill Bryson's "Road to Little Dribbling." I love Bryson's sense of humor, and it was educational for me, as my knowledge of England is pretty sketchy.
I'm also revising an old mystery series I used to read. Margaret Maron's Deborah Knott series. I'm reading "Buzzard's Table" which I missed a few years ago.
Also just downloaded "Wolf Hall" which I've been meaning to read for several years....historical fiction, and long. What's everyone else reading? Do you have more time to read in the summer, or less?


message 3: by Sheryl (new)

Sheryl | 109 comments Mod
Good question! We library staff got a little derailed by our move to a different automation system. Anyone have any suggestions? I read a good travel book recently, Bill Bryson's "Road to Little Dribbling." I love Bryson's sense of humor, and it was educational for me, as my knowledge of England is pretty sketchy.
I'm also revising an old mystery series I used to read. Margaret Maron's Deborah Knott series. I'm reading "Buzzard's Table" which I missed a few years ago.
Also just downloaded "Wolf Hall" which I've been meaning to read for several years....historical fiction, and long. What's everyone else reading? Do you have more time to read in the summer, or less?


message 4: by Zoe (new)

Zoe Pane | 12 comments Hi I just am wanting to get back into reading, kinda been busy and got away from all of it...I am up for about anything


message 5: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 67 comments Mod
My favorite read so far this summer has been Peyton Place: as a kid I remember it being referenced in pop culture as something racy and scandalous, and it did not disappoint. Published in the 1950s, it is about all sorts of things happening behind closed doors in a small New England town, much of which would not be shocking to today's readers, but if a reader allows herself to be drawn into the world of a conservative small town with definitive lines between classes, races, and religious persuasion, it still has the ability to surprise.


message 6: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 67 comments Mod
Sheryl, I started Wolf Hall once, and it was kind of a dense read with lots of political stuff going on so I gave up, but with the intention of going back to it someday.


message 7: by Sheryl (new)

Sheryl | 109 comments Mod
GoodReads offered a special deal for $2.99 for the ebook of Wolf Hall, and I bit. Don't know when I will get to it :)


message 8: by Sheryl (new)

Sheryl | 109 comments Mod
From a CFPL Staff member:

Titles Discussed and Recommended as good summer reads.
Source: Talk of Iowa 5/24/16 with host Charity Nebbe

Guests were Jan Weismuller and Paul Ingram of Prairie Lights Bookstore, Judy Stafford of The Book People, Sioux City, an independent bookstore.

Paul’s List:
The Dig by John Preston
Till My Baby Comes Home by Jean Ross Justice
Canary by Duane Swierczynski


Judy’s:
LaRose by Louise Erdrich (LP avl 5/10/16)
Sellout by Paul Beatty
Excellent Lombards by Jane Hamilton (LP avl 8/24/16)
Meaning of Names by Karen Shoemaker, All Nebraska Reads choice
Miller’s Valley by Anna Quindlen
Shelter by Jung Yun
Inseparables by Stuart Nadler
Flood Girls by Fifield
A Hero of France by Alan Furst
Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend / Katarina Bivald
Miss Jane by Brad Watson
Eligible by Curtis Sittenfield
At the Edge of the Orchard by Chevalier
Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are by Frans de Waal
A Sugar Creek Chronicle: Observing Climate Change from a Midwestern Woodland
by Cornelia Mutel (Iowa City author)
Stoned: Jewelry, Obsession & How Desire Has Shaped the World by Aja Raden
Portable Veblen by Elizabeth MacKenzie
Lab Girl by Hope Jahren
Soul of An Octopus by Sy Montgomery
Michelle Obama A Life by Peter Slevin



Listen to the recorded program on IPR’s website.


message 9: by Sheryl (new)

Sheryl | 109 comments Mod
If you like to laugh, and a little profanity doesn't bother you, I recently read "Furiously Happy" by Jenny Lawson. Non-fiction, stories from her life. Nicely written, and she's hilarious. She also suffers from various illnesses, both physical and mental, and she's very frank about the effects on her life. Anyway, I thought it was a great book.


message 10: by Sheryl (new)

Sheryl | 109 comments Mod
If you like to laugh, and a little profanity doesn't bother you, I recently read "Furiously Happy" by Jenny Lawson. Non-fiction, stories from her life. Nicely written, and she's hilarious. She also suffers from various illnesses, both physical and mental, and she's very frank about the effects on her life. Anyway, I thought it was a great book.


message 11: by Amanda (new)

Amanda I just finished reading The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd. Great book, I'd definitely recommend it. Starting on Mansfield Park by Jane Austen now. I want to read all of her books and am about halfway through now. My reading picks up during the summer and I am so looking forward to making my way down my summer reading list!


message 12: by Sheryl (new)

Sheryl | 109 comments Mod
I love Jane Austen! Also loved The Invention of Wings. Thanks for suggesting.


message 13: by Amy (new)

Amy | 263 comments Mod
I agree with Sheryl about Jenny Lawson's Furiously Happy. I also like her first book Let's Pretend This Never Happened.


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