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message 1: by James (new)

James Corprew There will be a documentary being aired tonight on ESPN about the problems of domestic violence and how it is often passed off or ignored by the justice system regarding athletes.

http://espn.go.com/espnw/voices/artic...

"After so many years of ignoring or downplaying the insidiousness of violence against women, there seems to be a bit of a sea change in terms of acknowledgement. A few very high-profile cases have certainly helped create more widespread awareness and conversation.

People all over the country are shocked by the sexual assault accusations levied at Bill Cosby, disgusted by the Ray Rice domestic violence video, maddened by Baylor University's repeated failures in the face of violence against women and enraged by the light sentencing of Brock Turner, the ex-Stanford swimmer who was convicted of raping an unconscious girl behind a dumpster.

And yet, for some, the voices of 60-plus women speaking out about Cosby's alleged drugging and rapes are still not enough. For some, the Rice video merely prompted questions about what his fiancée must have done to provoke the blow that knocked her unconscious. For some, Baylor's coaches and administrators deserve a pass because it's not their job to report or act on their athletes' crimes. (According to Title IX law, it is.) And for too many, Turner isn't a rapist; that night was just college drinking and "promiscuousness" gone wrong. His victim was drunk, so whatever happened to her, while unconscious behind that dumpster, was her fault."


message 2: by Bunny (last edited Jun 11, 2016 06:01PM) (new)

Bunny Privilege and entitlement is a big problem. I was just talking to someone recently who was complaining that the police had not been polite to her when she was pulled over, and I said yes, that's unfortunate they pull people over a lot in that neighborhood and she said "I was driving a Lexus, it's not like I was a gardener or something." Which just made me stop talking to her and walk away.

I think over time that kind of thing - the assumption that driving a nice car or going to a "good" school, or having a lot of money or winning at sports means people are supposed to be nicer to you than they are to others, I think it builds on itself and gets worse and worse until it makes you start to think that the rules don't apply.


message 3: by Tiara (new)

Tiara Pearson | 20 comments I find this whole situation absolutely disgusting and infuriating. I practically laughed myself into insanity after hearing the judge's reasoning for giving Brock Turner, THE RAPIST, such a light sentence. His reasoning was that he didn't want it to have such a "severe impact on him." Yeah, ok because he so deserves it. His father made it even worse, saying that his son shouldn't have to suffer for "a mere 20 minutes of action." REALLY?? It is beyond heartbreaking to know that we live in a world where some people, not all, now equate rape with a few minutes of action.

I saw a tweet that summed everything up in a great and simple way.
"An athlete that is a rapist is not an athlete that simply made a mistake. It is a criminal who can swim." The fact of the matter is Brock Turner raped a woman who was unconscious. He needs more than 6 months in prison and that judge needs to be debenched.

To end on a more positive note, most of you, if you haven't already, may want to read the letter she wrote. It's a bit lengthy, but well-worth the read. I'm sure you can find it everywhere by now. I absolutely admire the fact that she was able to step out so soon and use her voice in such an empowering way. You can practically feel all of the strength and bravery radiating from this young woman.


message 4: by Bunny (new)

Bunny A petition to impeach the judge in the case has now gathered over 1 million signatures.


message 5: by James (new)

James Corprew Hopefully the petition pays off. Im amazed that individulas like that are able to be sitting judges.


message 6: by Sherrie (new)

Sherrie | 184 comments I agree with what others have said. Where I get stuck, however, is...how do we handle this? Like, in Brock Turner's case....what would have been the correct action on the judge's part?

I'm not a proponent of minimum jail sentences because the harm they can do to minority groups who are convicted way more frequently, and with less leniency, than others.

I also don't feel that more jail time equates to a better punishment. If our system is meant to cause the criminal to feel remorse and rehabilitation...then there needs to be enough time served to do that, but not so much that the person because more hardened in their criminal ways.

So what should the judge have done? I don't know...I'd love to hear other peoples thoughts. 6 months (with likely parole after 3) and on the sex offender's registry seems too small, especially given the lack of remorse that Brock and his "lovely" family seems to be showing thus far.

Thoughts?


message 7: by Bunny (last edited Jun 13, 2016 10:00AM) (new)

Bunny I think that one very important consideration in thinking about how to handle this is to consider that its not just about this one guy and whether or not he should go to jail for a longer time. There's a failure of the system at multiple levels here. The campus isn't handling student safety appropriately. The police investigating the crime clearly don't have the right resources in place to help victims navigate the system without infliction of further trauma. The court is still allowing attorneys to put the victim on trial. The probation officer in this case appears to have borked things up royally. It is now emerging that this is not the first time this particular judge has minimized sexual assault and taken sides.

So while the precipitating incident is Brock Turner, its not actually just about Brock Turner. Its about a broken system that needs to be reformed. The reason millions of people have read her statement and signed petitions and shared and talked about this is that it isn't an isolated incident.

This is an article about protests that just happened at the Stanford graduation ceremony. The protests were small and restrained but very significant because Stanford is not a place where people protest. Its "not done" in the campus culture, so that it was done at all is a marker of how big a problem there is.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/ellencushing...

One of the students, Violet Trachtenberg, ... told BuzzFeed News. “It’s scary to know the powerful places Stanford students will go, and it’s scary to know that there are people graduating on Sunday who don’t know about consent,” she said. “There are Brock Turners walking across the stage"

That's the problem. Its not this one guy. Its that there are thousands of him out walking around who don't know that what he did is wrong. Colleges are graduating people who don't know that rape is wrong. And those people go on into positions of power. Its not this one judge, its the other judges just like him. And the cops. And the parole officers. And the attorneys. And the parents. All of them thinking this is no big deal and not worth "ruining a promising young man" blah blah blah...

So what really needs to happen is that the whole community needs to educate and think and change. Because they are raising and supporting and enabling and excusing people who don't know this is wrong.

As far as what the judge should have done, I think the judge should have sentenced Turner to the maximum sentence for the crimes for which he was convicted, which would have been 13 years. Then provide a series of things he could have done each of which, satisfactorily completed, would reduce his sentence by some fixed amount.

These could include individual counseling, group counseling, restorative justice activities such as participating in mediated discussions with offenders and victims of crimes similar to the one he committed, community service, reparations work. Turner got into Stanford, he's clearly capable of doing homework, he could be required to do some research on the psychological effects of sexual assault on victims.

And in a way, "throwing the book" at Turner or making an example of him and thinking that had solved the problem would be just as much of a mistake as letting him off the hook. It might be emotionally satisfying to take out frustrations on him with a harsh sentence, but he didn't get there by himself. Plus punishing him doesn't stop it from happening again next time.


message 8: by James (new)

James Corprew Bunny wrote: "As far as what the judge should have done, I think the judge should have sentenced Turner to the maximum sentence for the crimes for which he was convicted, which would have been 13 years. Then provide a series of things he could have done each of which, satisfactorily completed, would reduce his sentence by some fixed amount.

These could include individual counseling, group counseling, restorative justice activities such as participating in mediated discussions with offenders and victims of crimes similar to the one he committed, community service, reparations work. Turner got into Stanford, he's clearly capable of doing homework, he could be required to do some research on the psychological effects of sexual assault on victims."


Yes to all this.


message 9: by Alyson (new)

Alyson Stone (alysonserenastone) | 149 comments I really don't think it's one bit right that they get away with it. Rape is a very serious crime and the way it is handled is just not right. It's just one of the many ways the justice systems have failed.


message 10: by James (new)

James Corprew Need more guys like this young man. Kudos to him for taking action and not just settling for the other man's word for it.

http://espn.go.com/college-sports/sto...

"A University of Florida football player assisted in stopping a rape that was happening behind a Gainesville restaurant early Thursday morning, according to police reports.

Cristian Garcia, a junior linebacker for the Florida Gators who played in one game last season, said he was working security at 101 Cantina when he and his co-worker saw the rapist and the woman behind the bar's Dumpster.

"I was taking out the garbage, and I saw the man pressing the woman up against the Dumpster. At first the guy said she was his girlfriend, but about five seconds later I realized the girl was unconscious," Garcia told GatorSports.com. "I turned around and pulled the guy by the shoulder and said, 'Get off.' That pretty much ended the situation then. He was intoxicated and attempted to throw some punches, but he slipped and busted his face on the wall."

"The rape was captured on video by another one of the witnesses. According to the Gainesville police report, the woman was unable to walk on her own, couldn't keep her eyes open and had difficulty speaking.

"I hold strong moral values and I don't think anyone should be taken advantage of in that kind of way," Garcia told local television station WTLV. "The girl was basically unconscious, so I knew there was no way she could be giving consent."

Gainesville police arrested 34-year-old Christopher Shaw and charged him with sexual battery.

Garcia also told WTLV that the man's friends were watching the assault take place and did nothing to help."


message 11: by Aglaea (new)

Aglaea | 987 comments On the topic of domestic abuse, Amber and Johnny, anyone? Because Depp seems like such a cool guy, he can't have done much. She must have been overreacting or provoking him, right? Oh sure, she presented the court with a photo, but still. Johnny is such a cool person. I for sure will keep watching his movies despite this tiny bump in the road. For sure it was a one-time occurrence, this drunken thing he had. Are we sure she didn't do anything? Maybe? Because she must have done something too.

It isn't just athletes.


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