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Archives 2016-2017 > 30 Days of Books: Day 26

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message 1: by Jenni Elyse (last edited Jun 12, 2016 01:20PM) (new)

Jenni Elyse (jenni_elyse) | 1264 comments Today’s prompt is a book that changed your opinion about something. This one is hard because I read mostly for entertainment and escape. I don’t often read books about heavy topics.

The only book that’s coming to mind is Me Before You by Jojo Moyes. If you haven’t read this book and want to, don’t read any further because there will be spoilers.

(view spoiler)

Which book has changed your opinion about something?


message 2: by JoLene (new)

JoLene (trvl2mtns) | 1532 comments My first thought was reading Exodus and The Haj by Leon Uris. I read these quite a while ago, but reading them helped me to understand the situation in the Middle East a bit better.

Growing up, I had never really though about the fact that in order to create Israel, that there were actually people that were being displaced. Its a very complex situation and those books really highlighted that.


message 3: by Susie (new)

Susie | 4488 comments Freedom by Jonathan Franzen changed my opinions out letting my cat traipse around the neighbourhood whenever she likes. It talked a lot about the damage that cats do to wildlife, specifically birds, and put it in to perspective for me.


message 4: by Nicole R (new)

Nicole R (drnicoler) | 7644 comments Hmmm...I may have to think about this one a bit. However, Jenni, your comments in your spoiler section are insightful and it resonates with the passion you feel for the subject.

I also think it illustrates that fictional "chick lit" books can make you think about very serious topics despite their otherwise light-hearted or romance-centric story lines. I think people often overlook the value of controversial topics in any genre, not just nonfiction.


message 5: by Nicole D. (new)

Nicole D. | 1470 comments This is SUCH a no brainer for me. (as 15 books pop into my head)

1. The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism - the power and the money, the money and the power, minute after minute, hour after hour .... (that was me doing Coolio) ... This book is about how all roads lead to money and how people and corporations will profit on EVERYTHING. Everything. The Thailand Tsunami for example. Eye. Opening.

2. The Autobiography of Malcolm X - Ever wonder when the black community is upset about something, and what they do is riot and burn? (gotta let it burn, gotta let it burn .... riots on the streets of miami - that's me doing Sublime.) This book helped me understand that and more about what it's like to be a black american. And also, how RELEVANT it still is today. (and Sadly becoming more relevant during our presidential race.)


message 6: by annapi (last edited Jun 12, 2016 09:39AM) (new)

annapi | 4851 comments Hard to remember, because as I grew up I'm sure I read a lot of books that were eye-openers to me. Books shaped just about every aspect of me.

I will say The Streets of Ashkelon, a short story by Harry Harrison that absolutely poleaxed me when I read it as a youth (can't remember how old I was), and started me on the road to rejecting religion. It showed me religion in a different and frightening light, and was the eye-opening point of no return for me, the moment at which you gain a knowledge that can never be unlearned no matter how terrifying it is, and realize you can only go forward from that point, even if forward looks like it is going into darkness.

The next book to take me farther on this road was The Third Eye by T. Lobsang Rampa, and although later books by this author were suspect as far as their veracity, this one and Doctor from Lhasa gave me a view into another religion, one I felt more sympathetic to than the Catholicism I was raised in.

The book that probably sealed my atheism, though there is not really one particular one that I can pinpoint, but let's just say it coalesced my feelings at the time, was Letter to a Christian Nation by Sam Harris.


message 7: by Lynn (new)

Lynn L | 87 comments Susie wrote: "Freedom by Jonathan Franzen changed my opinions out letting my cat traipse around the neighbourhood whenever she likes. It talked a lot about the damage that cats do to wildlife, specifically birds..."

I am with you there. In the past I had a beloved cat. She was wonderful. She loved to patrol the neighborhood. I had her spayed and she was always up to date on her shots. I thought I was being a responsible cat owner. After reading Freedom I will never allow a cat of mine to wander the outdoors. Franzen clearly shifted my thinking there.

Another book that impacted me was Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town. I can't say it changed me, rather it opened my eyes. It certainly made me so much more aware of the bias in our society. The recent rape of a woman by an athlete jarred my memory once again. The casual way some men (and woman) look at rape enraged me. I continue to be impacted by reading this book.


message 8: by Nicole R (new)

Nicole R (drnicoler) | 7644 comments Nicole wrote: "This is SUCH a no brainer for me. (as 15 books pop into my head)

1. The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism - the power and the money, the money and the power, minute af..."


Ugh, another reminder that I need to read This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate. Which you didn't actually list but, ya know, Naomi Klein...


message 9: by Amy (new)

Amy | 8153 comments I read From Beirut to Jerusalem about 20 years ago, and it so deepened my understanding and knowledge. It allowed me to have an educated opinion!


message 10: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8016 comments Nicole wrote: "Ugh, another reminder that I need to read This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate. Which you didn't actually list but, ya know, Naomi Klein..."

I really want to read that one, as well. (Probably no surprise...)


message 11: by Anita (new)

Anita Pomerantz | 6249 comments annapi wrote: "The book that probably sealed my atheism, though there is not really one particular one that I can pinpoint, but let's just say it coalesced my feelings at the time, was Letter to a Christian Nation by Sam Harris. ."

I have to agree that Sam Harris' writings definitely influenced my perspective on religion tremendously.


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