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message 1: by dany (new)

dany (elothwen)
how do the different dashes work and how do you use them omg someone help me... Also the use of ellipses in a novel how do those work



message 2: by dany (last edited Jun 11, 2016 02:02PM) (new)

dany (elothwen)
Are they formated that way, though? With them all together and a space between the words? I see them sometimes. . .like this . . . or like this. And do you ever capitalize the word after?



message 3: by kaya (new)

kaya (ananats) | 39 comments "Hi ... person," he said.
Like that.
You don't capitalise the word after, and they should be formatted like this -> word space dot dot dot space word.


message 4: by dany (new)

dany (elothwen)
What about interjecting your own thoughts? Like, a character is saying something, briefly changes the subject or explains something, and goes back to what they were saying. I see dashes for that but what kind are those? Example:

The thing stood there–human or otherwise–and stared back at me.

I'm pretty sure you can change it to commas, can't you?

And on that note, how should semicolons be used?

(Sorry that's a lot lol)



message 5: by kaya (new)

kaya (ananats) | 39 comments
semicolons get used in the following circumstances:
- when you're making a list and want to include extra information
like so:
He bought apples, because he liked them; bananas, which he hated; lychees, which he'd never eaten; and carrots, for cooking.
- in a sentence that joins two ideas that could go in separate sentences or you could use a comma or a colon.
like so:
They were huge, brown cows; he hated cows.

I'll steal your example for the other bit.
The thing stood there - human or otherwise - and stared back at me.
You're supposed to put spaces between the words and dashes.
On Word, and I think that Docs does this as well, this gets corrected to em dashes.
The thing stood there — human or otherwise — and stared back at me.



message 6: by Ema (new)

Ema (gee-fiera) The way I remember when to use semicolons is if it could be a separate sentence. Ex: he glanced around; the room was empty, but there were signs of life.


message 7: by kaya (last edited Jun 11, 2016 02:58PM) (new)

kaya (ananats) | 39 comments
You can also use them in place of a single dash.
E.g.
They couldn't believe what they saw - it was monstrous.
They couldn't believe what they saw; it was monstrous.



message 8: by marthie ! (new)

marthie ! (marthie) | 17 comments just out of curiosity, if you were trying to imply someone was being interrupted in a story, would you use an en dash, an em dash, or neither?


message 9: by Astra (new)

Astra  (sayomina) -

That dash

Example: "Well if you just-" She started then was cut of, "Guys! look at this" He shouted


message 10: by Ema (new)

Ema (gee-fiera) I'll be honest, I had no idea the dashes had names?


message 11: by Astra (new)

Astra  (sayomina) Neither did I


message 12: by Willa (new)

Willa Valentine (paper.seas) (paperseas) ❛ ᴅᴀɴʏ wrote: "how do the different dashes work and how do you use them omg someone help me... Also the use of ellipses in a novel how do those work"

Okay, so I'm not sure if the dash question was answered, but this is how I've always seen it:

If you use the little dash that you have on your keyboard (-), then you are linking words together. For example, semi-colon, rat-toad (sorry that was random XD), etc. But if you use the long dash (type &.mdash; but delete ONLY the periods) — then you are splitting pieces of text. For example: She whispered into the jar — what a silly thing, too, to whisper to a jar, but it couldn't be helped — as the lights flickered overhead and he watched, silent, from behind.

Anyway, for the official names and other stuff, look at the Wikipedia article. The short one is en dash, the long one is em dash. Also, I've always used the longer one for cutting people off?


message 13: by Willa (new)

Willa Valentine (paper.seas) (paperseas) ❝ ĸαyα ❞ [ hiatus - school ] wrote: "semicolons get used in the following circumstances:
- when you're making a list and want to include extra information
like so:
He bought apples, because he liked them; bananas, which he hated; lych..."


I was taught that is was grammatically incorrect to use more than one in a sentence, but a lot of authors do anyway, soo...


message 14: by kaya (new)

kaya (ananats) | 39 comments I think school teachers globally should just come to an agreement on how to use semicolons, because there seems to be a lot of discrepancies.


message 15: by Willa (new)

Willa Valentine (paper.seas) (paperseas) Yeah. I typically use more than one in long, descriptive sentences, but when it comes to using them to branch off with another sentence, I think using one is correct.


message 16: by [deleted user] (last edited Jul 01, 2016 12:57AM) (new)

❝ ĸαyα ❞ [ hiatus - school ] wrote: "You can also use them in place of a single dash.
E.g.
They couldn't believe what they saw - it was monstrous.
They couldn't believe what they saw; it was monstrous."


This isn't strictly true? It works in this case because they're both independent clauses. But a single em dash isn't always used for two independent clauses; it is used to "interrupt" your writing, so to speak:

She looked at the other students in the room—God, she had to get writing quickly.

Or, in dialogue:

"Actually, I was going to—"

When two are used in a sentence it's similar to a parenthetical and usually adds more information, or provides commentary:

He watched her pick up the paintbrush—something he had seen many times before—and begin to work her magic.*

*In this situation, what comes before and after the section in the dashes should form a coherent sentence.


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/Semi... is a good reference for semicolon use. IMO, if you aren't sure whether or not to use one, it's best to just not.


message 18: by kaya (new)

kaya (ananats) | 39 comments aubree — ᴄʟɪᴄᴋ. ʙᴏᴏᴍ. ᴛʜᴇɴ ɪᴛ ʜᴀᴘᴘᴇɴᴇᴅ. wrote: "❝ ĸαyα ❞ [ hiatus - school ] wrote: "You can also use them in place of a single dash.
E.g.
They couldn't believe what they saw - it was monstrous.
They couldn't believe what they saw; it was monstr..."


was actually talking about semicolons, not em dashes.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

You were describing them as being interchangeable with dashes, though, which they're not. (And an em dash is used in that case rather than the typical dash, though they're generally accepted as interchangable online as em dashes are not on the keyboard. If you write in Word or even Notes on a Mac, though, it'll autocorrect to an em dash for you.)


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