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Everybody Rise
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Further Reading from our Authors > Further Reading from Stephanie Clifford, author of Everybody Rise

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St. Martin's Press (stmartinspress) | 163 comments Mod
Louis Auchincloss, A Voice from Old New York. Though Auchincloss’s primary medium was fiction, this memoir is captivating. Auchincloss, from an old-money New York family, has enough distance from the society he lived in to be an acerbic, engaging storyteller. I borrowed Camilla’s Racquet Club bracelet from this book—I like to think Camilla could’ve been a descendant of the people Auchincloss writes about. Essential reading if you’re interested in what “old New York” looked like from the inside.


St. Martin's Press (stmartinspress) | 163 comments Mod
James Baldwin, Notes of a Native Son. Baldwin’s essays are sharp and moving. The ones he wrote while he lived in Harlem are particularly thought-provoking—while so much has changed since he published the essays in 1955, so little has, in some ways.


St. Martin's Press (stmartinspress) | 163 comments Mod
Edwin G. Burrows and Mike Wallace, Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898. Written like a novel, virtually every chapter of this book is a delight. I haven’t seen the city the same way since I read it.


St. Martin's Press (stmartinspress) | 163 comments Mod
Robert A. Caro, The Power Broker. If you want to work in journalism or government in New York—or you just like a good read—start this book now. This is the tale of Robert Moses, who headed public works in the city and state and made the New York landscape what it is. Caro’s reporting and research is a feat, and it gives a fresh perspective on who really runs New York. (Bonus: this book is heavy enough to double as a weight. Learn and tone all at once!)


St. Martin's Press (stmartinspress) | 163 comments Mod
Dominick Dunne, The Two Mrs. Grenvilles. So. Juicy. I grew up in Seattle, where I discovered a copy of this book one summer when I was about ten. Seattle was all hiking, fleece, and pleasant talk about the Huskies. With this, I was transported to high-society New York City, and its money, sex, and glamour. I think this book was my mother’s, but I never gave it back to her; I hid it away behind my other, more age-appropriate books, and promised myself that I’d try out New York myself someday.


St. Martin's Press (stmartinspress) | 163 comments Mod
Stephen Sondheim, Finishing the Hat. This is a coffee-table book, but a coffee-table book you’ll want to read, not just flip through. Sondheim gives notes on his lyrics and shows, including why early drafts changed, how to deal with failure, and his gimlet-eyed view of New York life. I’m a huge Sondheim fan: The title of the book comes from his “The Ladies Who Lunch,” and I played “Getting Married Today” over and over to amp up the anxiety as I wrote Evelyn’s quasi-mad scene in the boat, among other Sondheim indulgences. Reading this helped me sharpen my own writing.


St. Martin's Press (stmartinspress) | 163 comments Mod
Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth. Why do we want what we want, and what happens when we don’t get it? Lily Bart, Wharton’s heroine, falls out of society despite her grasping efforts in this beautifully written book, which was a direct inspiration for Everybody Rise.


St. Martin's Press (stmartinspress) | 163 comments Mod
E. B. White, Here is New York. Whenever I’m feeling run over by the city—it’s pouring, I’m covered in mud from a dollar van that almost hit me in a crosswalk, and my umbrella broke before my day even started—I turn to this lovely book. “No one should come to New York to live unless he is willing to be lucky,” White writes; this book always makes me feel not just lucky, but in love with the city.


St. Martin's Press (stmartinspress) | 163 comments Mod
Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns. New York City is one of three destination points in this history, which follows African American migrants leaving the South after World War I. This is not only an absorbing history book: Wilkerson has made the characters she profiles come alive, making this narrative nonfiction at its best.


St. Martin's Press (stmartinspress) | 163 comments Mod
Richard Yates, The Easter Parade. Yates captures mid-century American loneliness better than just about anyone. In this novel, two sisters navigate through their unhappy lives, each trying to keep up appearances. Yates is a spare and brutal writer who pulls you so deep into his world that to recover, you may need to have one of those three-martini lunches so popular among his characters.


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