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message 1: by Portia, Novice Mod (last edited Jun 09, 2016 01:15PM) (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
I call them hoagies. In Boston, they are grinders. In New York they are gyros. Somewhere they are Italian cold cut.

What do you call them?

So what do you call what's below the main level of your house? I call it "down cellar."


message 2: by happy (new)

happy (happyone) | 142 comments In Utah - Hoagies or Submarine sandwiches

the basement


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 75 comments Here in S.C. they are "subs" and "basement." Though most houses don't have much of one; ours consists of laundry and woodworking equipment, the furnace, a sump pump, and a creek trying to spring through (hence the sump pump).


message 4: by Portia, Novice Mod (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
I grew up in NEPA but my BFF grew up in a town just next to Boston. She also called it "down cellar." Her ancestors came from Ireland. Mine didn't, but there was a large population of Irish immigrants and their descendants in NEPA. So I wonder if the term came here through Ellis Island.

Here's another.

Y'all The South
You Guys NEPA, New York and points north
Yoo-ins (or yuns) Pittsburgh


message 5: by Dawn (new)

Dawn | 61 comments subs & the basement

My husband informs me y'all is singular and all y'all is the plural. He's a Missouri redneck (he more or less jokes). I find y'all has moved north towards Chicago a little--and no, I never actually heard anyone besides Mayor Daley say things like dem, dose, da, and youse outside of a SNL skit. Y'guys, maybe. Or maybe that's just me.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 75 comments Here in SC, "y'all" is always plural.


message 7: by Dawn (new)

Dawn | 61 comments That's where I first heard the term, so I think of it as plural myself. But in some parts of the south (like some of Missouri I gather), it's singular. I've been other discussions where some people backed up my husband. Sub-regional?


message 8: by Portia, Novice Mod (last edited Jun 10, 2016 09:26PM) (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
Hey, you guys! Anyone from NEPA and points north? I know people from Syracuse say "You guys" because I knew someone from Syracuse who said "You guys."


message 9: by RJay (new)

RJay (plantagenetjunkie) | 100 comments Mod
I grew up in Ohio but had cousins in NJ - first heard the term "yous" when visiting them.

Growing up, we used the term "cellar" but as I grew older, it became "basement".

What about the term "soda" vs. "pop"?


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 75 comments Dawn wrote: "That's where I first heard the term, so I think of it as plural myself. But in some parts of the south (like some of Missouri I gather), it's singular. I've been other discussions where some people..."

This is the first I've ever heard of "y'all" being used in the singular, and people considering that to be correct. It's always plural here, and in NC and GA (the places I've lived).

It's neither "soda" or "pop" down here - it's either a "soft drink" or a "coke." Mostly "soft drink." (Yes, down here "coke" can be generic. You ask for a coke at a restaurant and they'll ask you what kind of coke do you want, Coke or Pepsi or Diet Sprite, or whatever.)


message 11: by Portia, Novice Mod (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
I grew up calling it soda. Her in Metro DC, if you ask for "coke" you are asked, "Diet or regular?",


message 12: by Taylor (new)

Taylor Up here in Canada (at least in my part) it's definitely pop.


message 13: by Dawn (new)

Dawn | 61 comments I call it soda, despite nearly 30 years in or near Chicago, which is mainly a "pop" town. Now I'm near St Louis and we're a pocket of soda or soda pop.

As for the y'all/all y'all, I gather y'all being singular is Deep South: parts of Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi. Also it's very rural in some of NC and GA. My husband said he learned it in Alabama. I lived 4 years in SC when I was a kid, and have no clear recollection of dialects. So can't swear to it out of my own experience.


message 14: by happy (last edited Jun 15, 2016 10:35PM) (new)

happy (happyone) | 142 comments Here, soda and pop are used interchangably and even sometime combined (sodapop)

Since I grew up an Army Brat, y'all and all y'all are still in my vocabulary, but they are not normally used here.

One amusing ancedote. When my father was called to active duty during the Berlin Crisis, we moved to Ft. Hood, Texas. My mother had only been out of the state of Utah once and that was to California. When we stopped at a store after arriving in Texas. After completing the purchase, the clerk said "Y'all come back now, heah." My mom turned around and went back to the counter thinking she had forgotten something. She was highly embarassed when she realized the clerk was just being polite :)


message 15: by Zoey (new)

Zoey  (rozannen) | 1 comments Soft drink or Fizzy here in Aus :)


message 16: by Charlene (new)

Charlene | 24 comments Subs, coke, & basement where I grew up in SC. (Hey, Susanna!). I use y'all as singular or plural.


message 17: by Portia, Novice Mod (last edited Jun 16, 2016 10:18PM) (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
Does your neighborhood have its own name? We live near Washington, D.C. but our neighborhood is called Clermont Woods after the plantation that was here 200 years ago.

I got myself into trouble a couple of Holidays ago. My Spouse's family is from England, and often they name their houses like people did in the old days. So, I named ours and put it on the return labels.

Portia and Mr. Bell
Street
Harts 'N' Wrens
NOVA
USA

Sooo, some folks who we only kept up with once a year thought we had opened a business called Harts 'n' Wrens and were trying to sell them something. One way or another (some not so nicely) our Holiday card list got shorter. Saves us postage $, I guess :P

Anyway, do you name your property? Does your development have a name? How about your neighborhood?

Portia from
Harts 'n' Wrens
Clermont Woods
USA


message 18: by happy (new)

happy (happyone) | 142 comments Around here - it depends, some do (mainly the high rent districts, but not always). I've never heard my neighborhood refered to by a name and I've lived in my home 28 yrs now.


message 19: by Dawn (new)

Dawn | 61 comments As far as I can tell, all neighborhoods (77!) and a number of sub-neighborhoods in Chicago have names. There are a handful of old private estates in the suburbs that have names. The only buildings I know with names are business or historical.

In St Louis, I know some of the neighborhoods have names in the city and the suburbs (I was surprised my neighborhood has a name; I live in a fairly small suburb); don't know if all do. Plus there are a lot of small housing developments that have names (complete with signs at the main entry).


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 75 comments Most neighborhoods have a name hereabouts, or are actually another small town - SC has very conservative city annexation laws.

Some names for neighborhoods in this area go back before the Civil War, such as the West End or Nicholtown (pronounced "nickeltown" - and yes it has both Nickel and Dime Streets). The area I live in now is North Main, which started to be developed in the 20s and 30s (our house was built in 1933, and is the oldest on our block).

Formerly we lived in Taylors, which is another (much smaller) town just down the road. Taylors was once a part of the ring of textile mill towns surrounding Greenville, but almost all of the mills have closed. (I think one now makes textiles for BMWs, as the BMW plant is just down the road in Spartanburg. But most are closed.)

My grandparents' house had a name, which I believe was the result of it having been a post office in the 19th century (my great-great-grandmother was postmistress), but later that small community was swallowed by a larger town which grew up. (Not that Raeford, NC is a large town! But it is a county seat, albeit of the smallest county in NC. If you've ever eaten House of Raeford turkey, yeah, that's where it's from.)


message 21: by RJay (new)

RJay (plantagenetjunkie) | 100 comments Mod
happy wrote: "Here, soda and pop are used interchangably and even sometime combined (sodapop)

Since I grew up an Army Brat, y'all and all y'all are still in my vocabulary, but they are not normally used here.

..."

Good Chuckle!


message 22: by Kimber (last edited Jun 21, 2016 04:19PM) (new)

Kimber (kimberlibri) | 14 comments I've always lived in neighborhoods with names but they usually are used locally to identify an area and have nothing to do with postal addresses. For ex. I live on River Ridge Road in Arlington, Texas (not my real addy) but I would tell people in Arlington that I live in Wimbledon and they would know exactly where it was. Fort Worth is divided into sections as well - Downtown, SoDo, 7th Street, the Highlands, Cityview, Eastside, Northside, Seminary, Medical District etc. etc. but those designations are mostly used by locals.

Oh and it's soft drink or coke, basement (which no one has) and sub sandwich here. I have family in Minnesota so I always get fun of down here for saying 'Soda'


message 23: by Jane (new)

Jane Here in upstate NY: we call them submarines or subs but I'm from Wilmington, DE, so I still call them hoagies. In upstate NY it's basement, but back home we used either cellar or basement.
And, I don't know where these come from: counterpane, not bedspread; spigot, not faucet or tap. When I was a very little girl, we lived in Cincinnati, so maybe they are holdovers?


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 75 comments In my grandmother's speech, "spigot" was specifically for outdoor faucets, in her garden. She lived in rural NC.


message 25: by Portia, Novice Mod (last edited Jun 22, 2016 12:37PM) (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
Spigot was outdoors, now that you mention it. We didn't use counterpane but sofa, davenport, and settee were interchangeable but should they be?

Hassock or foot stool?


message 26: by Taylor (new)

Taylor Never even heard of hassock. It's either footstool or ottoman.


message 27: by Jane (new)

Jane Portia wrote: "Spigot was outdoors, now that you mention it. We didn't use counterpane but sofa, davenport, and settee were interchangeable but should they be?

Hassock or foot stool?"


Spigot was either out or in. I'd think sofa and davenport, also couch are interchangeable but to me a settee wouldn't have cushions, whereas the other 3 do. Hassock, footstool and ottoman I'd think would be interchangeable.


message 28: by Kimber (new)

Kimber (kimberlibri) | 14 comments Faucet inside, tap outside. Couch and sometimes sofa but never davenport or settee. Ottoman, rarely footstool and never hassock. Comforter for the big heavy winter bed cover, bedspread for the thinner summer one. My Canadian fiance has a Duvet and Duvet cover which I call a big floofy comforter. He has pajamas while I have sleepers.
Also - what is the stretch of grass that divides roads going in different directions. Here we call it a median. Anyone else?


message 29: by happy (new)

happy (happyone) | 142 comments Median or Burr pit

mainly footstool sometimes ottoman never hassock (I had to look that one up :))

couch or sofa (interchangeable) never settee or davenport

comforter sometimes duvet (mainly comforter) Bedspread is the last thing you put on the bed over the blanket/comforter


message 30: by Portia, Novice Mod (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
I like "floofy" :). Just the two of us call it "poof" because we have a cat who likes to jump in the air and land on the floofy quilt making it go "poof"!


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 75 comments Sofa or couch; never heard "davenport" or "settee." If it's a two-seater, it's a loveseat.

Ottoman or footstool are the usages here, but "hassock" also sounds right, as my mother uses it. (She is originally from New Jersey.)

It's a faucet generally, but you might use "spigot" if it's outside. "Tap" is not something I hear much.

Comforter/duvet are pretty much synonymous, but a bedspread is much thinner and what you use instead in the summer.

It's pajamas. Never heard "sleepers."

A median divides the road in the middle.


message 32: by Dawn (new)

Dawn | 61 comments Speaking of medians, what about the strip of grass between the sidewalk and the street? In Chicago, it's the parkway.


message 33: by happy (new)

happy (happyone) | 142 comments Utah - parking or curb strip


message 34: by Portia, Novice Mod (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
Susanna - Censored by GoodReads wrote: "Sofa or couch; never heard "davenport" or "settee." If it's a two-seater, it's a loveseat.

Ottoman or footstool are the usages here, but "hassock" also sounds right, as my mother uses it. (She is ..."


Nightgown. I'm one of those "Age-ed Ps" with the flannel night gown and fuzzy slippers.


message 35: by Portia, Novice Mod (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
happy wrote: "Utah - parking or curb strip"

Yes, there is a name for that strip. Now it's going to drive me crazy!


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 75 comments "Pajamas" and "nightgown" are both in use here - pajamas have pants, and nightgowns don't.


message 37: by Portia, Novice Mod (new)

Portia | 264 comments Mod
;-)


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