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June, 2016: Fantasy > Station Eleven / Emily St. John Mandel - 4.5 stars

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message 1: by Blueberry (new)

Blueberry (blueberry1) Station Eleven 4.5 stars

I don't usually like the dystopian, post-apolcalytic genre. At least not in movies, and I thought in books too. Even though I do watch The Walking Dead, Fear the Walking Dead, and loved the Giver books by Lois Lowry. Ha, I guess I didn't realize it before.
I really like this book. While reading it I kept thinking that I was reading a cross between Walking Dead and the 6 Degrees of Kevin Bacon game. You know the game where you connect names that relate to each other to try and reach Kevin Bacon with 6 steps. Everyone (the main characters) in the story is connected to everyone else in some way and it all centers around a famous actor, Arthur Leander, who has a heart attack on stage performing King Lear on the night the world changes with a rampant flu epidemic. Years later we pick up the story with Kirsten, who is an actress with the Traveling Symphony which travels around to communities with their 'safety zone' performing concerts and Shakespeare plays. The story goes back and forth in time and with different narrators but basically following Arthur's and Kirsten's stories.
I would like to find more of this kind of book (without vampires and/or zombies) so if you have recommendations, please post.


message 2: by Susie (new)

Susie | 4488 comments I really enjoyed it too. Very readable.


message 3: by Denizen (last edited Jun 06, 2016 05:39PM) (new)

Denizen (den13) | 1138 comments I thought this was an excellent book. Dystopian/post-apocalyptic is a favorite of mine. It's funny but I've never thought of vampire and/or zombie literature as part of either genre but, thinking about it, I guess it is. Not my cup of tea.

The Road (Pulitzer Prize winner) is probably my favorite but it is certainly grimmer than Station Eleven. The Age of Miracles, The Leftovers, or The Dog Stars are books that I have enjoyed that are just a little different from much of the genre. You're from California, right? The Water Knife is one I hope to read soon. It's also tagged with thriller and mystery.


message 4: by Karin (new)

Karin | 6920 comments I haven't read Station 11. Are you looking for dystopian or fantasy? Or scifi?

Dystopian fiction doesn't include vampires or zombies.

I have read MANY dystopian novels--literary, mainstream, scifi, y/a and other types of dystopian, not all post-apocalyptic, either. I even did a dysopian personal challenge one year. I've also read a fair bit of scifi.

If you mean fantasy, and are interested in one that was written by a homeschooled high schooler (the first of the 4 books was, at any rate) then you might try Eragon. No vampires or zombies, but elves and dragons.


message 5: by Blueberry (new)

Blueberry (blueberry1) I assumed zombies and vampires because when I looked up dystopia books on Goodreads list opiate they all had ...vampires and/or zombies. I did add The Road to my tbr list. I will check out the others too. Thanks.


message 6: by Blueberry (new)

Blueberry (blueberry1) Eragon I never cared for. I felt like the author took every fantasy book he had ever read and put them together into Eragon.


message 7: by Amy (new)

Amy | 8282 comments Hated Station Eleven. Not a fan of dystopia at all in general. We'll see how this month fares.


message 8: by Jennifer P. (new)

Jennifer P. Pope (jenjunum) | 902 comments You might like Wool Omnibus It's post-apocalyptic/dystopian-ish. About a created utopia built to survive an apocalypse. It was originally published in shorter novellas, but the Wool Omnibus contains 3 novellas that create a novel-length book. It was originally self-published novellas. There are 3 total novel length books (I know it's confusing!). I've read the first 2 of the novel-length ones. I think I rated the first 5* and the 2nd 4*.

I only have Station Eleven 3 stars. Some of the story lines felt incomplete and characters seemed forgotten to me. I but I loved the premise of the story. The connection to the graphic novel/comic sometimes felt a little thin to me too.


message 9: by Olivermagnus (new)

 Olivermagnus (lynda214) | 1948 comments I liked Station Eleven a lot. I don't read very much dystopia but I enjoyed the author's vision of her dystopian world. She managed to instill not just a sense of hope, but a sense of decency. It gave me hope that civilization can continue on if the world ever experiences something like this. Another one I especially liked was The Dog Stars.


message 10: by Jennifer P. (new)

Jennifer P. Pope (jenjunum) | 902 comments If you liked the hopeful feeling the Station Eleven ended on, you won't like Wool. Not that it has a terrible ending, but there definitely isn't a trove of Shakespearean actors roaming the countryside.


message 11: by annapi (new)

annapi | 4909 comments Blueberry wrote: "Eragon I never cared for. I felt like the author took every fantasy book he had ever read and put them together into Eragon."

I absolutely agree! I was very disappointed with it.


message 12: by Karin (last edited Jun 08, 2016 02:39PM) (new)

Karin | 6920 comments Blueberry wrote: "Eragon I never cared for. I felt like the author took every fantasy book he had ever read and put them together into Eragon."

Yes, but given that he wrote that first book at the age of 16, I didn't let that bother me as much as I normally would. I didn't love it, either, but my son read all 4 books and had never before read such long ones. After that, though, he was done with fantasy for good. The 4th one wasn't out when I read them along with my then homeschooling daughter, but I thought the first one was the best written of all of them.


message 13: by annapi (new)

annapi | 4909 comments Karin wrote: "Blueberry wrote: "After that, though, he was done with fantasy for good. "

I think with better books he will go back to reading fantasy. There's so much better out there!


message 14: by Blueberry (new)

Blueberry (blueberry1) Added The Dog Star and Wool Omnibus to my TBR. I will have to spread out reading these new suggestions. I don't want to depress myself with impending destruction of the world.


message 15: by Denizen (new)

Denizen (den13) | 1138 comments Blueberry wrote: "Added The Dog Star and Wool Omnibus to my TBR. I will have to spread out reading these new suggestions. I don't want to depress myself with impending destruction of th..."

I can't remember if you enjoy audio books. The Dog Stars had a first person narrator and worked very well for audio.


message 16: by Karin (new)

Karin | 6920 comments annapi wrote: "Karin wrote: "Blueberry wrote: "After that, though, he was done with fantasy for good. "

I think with better books he will go back to reading fantasy. There's so much better out there!"


Well, he later did read The Hobbit, and still didn't go back. It's not really his thing. He does like the Chet and Bernie Little detective series, though. He also likes nonfiction books about airplanes.


message 17: by annapi (new)

annapi | 4909 comments Karin wrote: "Well, he later did read The Hobbit, and still didn't go back. It's not really his thing."

LOL I wasn't very impressed by The Hobbit either.... I much preferred LOTR even at the age of 9. Really, there is so much better out there. I hope one day he accidentally reads a really good fantasy book that will make him reconsider the genre.


message 18: by Karin (new)

Karin | 6920 comments annapi wrote: "Karin wrote: "Well, he later did read The Hobbit, and still didn't go back. It's not really his thing."

LOL I wasn't very impressed by The Hobbit either.... I much preferred LOTR even at the age o..."


He might, but he's not the biggest reader out there yet. He's more into music, airplanes, etc. My husband doesn't even read fiction.

I liked The Hobbit when I was 9 and even though I bought LOTR not long after, didn't get around to reading that until I was 19, and I'm not sure why.


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