World, Writing, Wealth discussion

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message 1: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Awards are the only measure of talent.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Actually I feel the opposite. I think awards measure skill and sales measures talent. Although not mutually exclusive skill and talent are different animals.


message 3: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Skills and talent - how are they different?


message 4: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13089 comments Awards imply that someone has to enroll or be enrolled into a competition, but there may be prodigies that don't bother. And I hear many claim awards are biased.
When clearly having a talent it still might be tricky. Even the great Stephen King has books with less than 4 stars rating on the average and Grisham and Dan Brown. And when you buy a disc, don't you hope that at least 4-5 songs are good and not just a single heard on the radio? One good song probably means there is some talent and 10 others that are so-so don't undermine it.


message 5: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Very well said Nik. One likeable song on a CD, that's it. Prodigies usually don't bother. They also don't want to be 'like' anyone.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments The cd analogy is a great one. With writing skill is an adherence to the proscribed guidelines of the art and craft of writing. Talent in writing is the ability to write books people want to read. It sounds like an oversimplification but there it is. I even reviewed a book once that was full of grammatical errors and other minor plot issues yet I couldn't put the book down. The writer had loads of talent yet no skill. I've also read classics that were skilled but lacked talent.


message 7: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13089 comments Dan wrote: "I wish I had his confidence though.

Sadly it's also the same as other forms of media today. So many people are trying, so many people are lost under the avalanche of efforts. And all you really have to do is pay for publicity and then you can call yourself a bestseller as soon as the first book hits the shelf and people will pick it up expecting top quality.

Would an intelligent and self-effacing artist do such a thing? Only at the end of their tether is my guess! ..."


In my opinion confidence is something that should be fed from an external sources - (beta-) readers, bloggers, reviewers. I'm too subjective to evaluate my own work. Since I write pretty controversial stuff, I've expected to receive a great deal of critique and I'm actually surprised to have (still?) a sort of positive balance -:) I've read Harlan Coben's interview preceding the release of his latest 'Fool me once' and he claims that even after so many bestsellers, he never feels confident about a new book and anxious to see how it's accepted....
Publicity is a next step. It definitely works, but you should know where and how to use/target it, I guess. Many who tried paid ads report back with losses, so trial and error can be an expensive lesson.
I wonder if I bought few ads on British TV, which will cost me 20k, let's say, during England - Russia Euro 2016 game on June 11, how it would impact sales. From the point of view of correlation it's a perfect occasion, but (un)fortunately I won't have guts to blow this money just like that. Should've tried to recruit Roman for sponsorship earlier -:)


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments PR can become a self-fulfilling prophecy. When you believe in your book and pronote it sometimes others believe in it as a natural consequence. The trial and error aspect of pomoting is certainly true enough but at the end of the day we're all just taking chances.


message 9: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9226 comments My problem with awards [apart from the fact I don't get them :-( ] is that the marking is highly subjective. I recently entered a scientific contest, in which the object was to explain the phenomenon to a 12 yr old. The winners gave nice accounts, with really nice illustrations. What I gave was a couple of detailed experiments they could do themselves, with questions they should ask of what they saw. In other words, I gave a small work program whereas the others gave light reading. So, which is better? It depends on the judge. Remember, when grading, you also grade yourself.


message 10: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13089 comments Ian wrote: "In other words, I gave a small work program whereas the others gave light reading. So, which is better? It depends on the judge. Remember, when grading, you also grade yourself. "

It's hard to judge such a different approach and you have fans of each. When you enter kids stores, you have scientific experiments kits as well as light reading digests... Not sure, what sells better


message 11: by Eldon (new)

Eldon Farrell | 685 comments Mehreen wrote: "Skills and talent - how are they different?"

Skill is something you acquire while talent is something you're born with. If you work hard enough you can become skilled but if you aren't born with talent, nothing you do can gain it for yourself.


message 12: by Eldon (new)

Eldon Farrell | 685 comments I have a hard time believing that awards judge talent of any kind. It would be far more accurate to say that awards judge popularity, which of course is a vastly different thing then talent.

Personally, I pay no attention to awards or award shows for just that reason. I've read many very talented writers who for lack of widespread popularity would never win an award; so how can they be said to judge talent when so many talented writers go unnoticed?


message 13: by Dave (new)

Dave Edlund (dedlund) | 13 comments Nik wrote: "Awards imply that someone has to enroll or be enrolled into a competition, but there may be prodigies that don't bother. And I hear many claim awards are biased.
When clearly having a talent it sti..."


Opt for the Greatest Hits compilations :-)


message 14: by Dave (new)

Dave Edlund (dedlund) | 13 comments Mehreen wrote: "Awards are the only measure of talent."

Yes and no. Yes, in the opinion of the one judging. No in the opinion of dissenters. As Nik pointed out, even the "best" authors get poor reviews from readers. What are the qualities of a good writer, or a great writer? What does it mean to say an author has talent? There are likely as many different answers are their are people responding. Like any other form of art, it is a subjective process to separate good writing from poor writing.


message 15: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13089 comments Dave wrote: "Opt for the Greatest Hits compilations :-)"

-:)
Yep, solves the problem, as they are all good, but there are only so many times you can hear most of them... -:)
Interesting how long 'i ain't got cash .... and ...i don't need dollar bills' broadcast every couple of hours on the radio will hold


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