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The Fifth Season (The Broken Earth, #1)
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BOOK 18: The Fifth Season

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Rachel | 111 comments Mod
Here's the discussion thread for The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin. Discussion day is tomorrow, June 5 - hope to see you there!!


Rachel | 111 comments Mod
Here are the discussion questions: as always, feel free to answer any, all, or none of these, and add your own if you have any!

Many many thanks to Samar for writing these!! She wrote even more, but we sadly cut a few so as to not scare people off from the sheer length of this post.

WARNING: MAJOR SPOILERS IN THESE QUESTIONS. DO NOT READ UNTIL YOU'VE FINISHED THE BOOK!

1. What comparisons do you see Jemisin drawing between the oppression of the orogenes and real world occurrences? How well do you think this was handled?

2. Did you find the prologue useful or overly expository? Was it odd to read something that seemed to be directly addressing you, the reader, in such a familiar way? Did you find it distracting or did it help pull you in?

3. Did you find the second person chapters distracting or did they help anchor your to Essun?

4. Were you surprised by the reveal that all three narrators were the same woman at different points in her life?

5. We get many hints of advanced technology that still lingers, and the story of Father Earth talks about environmental pollution and fracking. Do you think it’s possible the Stillness is a post-apocalyptic version of our own world? Does this tie in with the final line of the book somehow?

6. Was the world building overwhelming? Did you find Appendix I and II helpful? What do you still find confusing in terms of world building?

7. Which is more menacing, stone eaters or obelisks? What do you think the purpose of the obelisks is? Why did the Guardians create them? What is the connection between the obelisks, the stone eaters, and the orogenes?

8. What do you think Alabaster’s ultimate goal is? To get revenge? To start over? Why do you think the stone eaters are working with him?

9. Are you going to read the second book in this series?


Rachel | 111 comments Mod
my experience reading this book can be described as someone who’s never studied art history staring at a painting in the louvre. okay, it’s good, but i’m not sure what it means?! that basically sums it up. the only fantasy i ever read is harry potter, so this is not something i ever would have picked up on my own. but i’m glad i did - though sometimes strange and frustrating, i thought this book was ultimately a rewarding read.

1. What comparisons do you see Jemisin drawing between the oppression of the orogenes and real world occurrences? How well do you think this was handled?

there are obvious parallels with slavery, made even more obvious by the fact that the narrator is a woman of color. i thought this was masterfully one, and one of my favorite things about this book! obviously as a black woman, n.k. jemisin has had her share of first-hand experience with oppression, and i think that shines in her prose. i wouldn’t trust these themes to be incorporated as well by someone of a more privileged demographic.

2. Did you find the prologue useful or overly expository? Was it odd to read something that seemed to be directly addressing you, the reader, in such a familiar way? Did you find it distracting or did it help pull you in?

it was too much at once for me. i get overwhelmed by massive amounts of description all at once, so i sort of wished at this point that the story would get going, because i find getting invested in characters helps. it took me probably at least 25% or 30% before i started getting interested in this book; before that i was just a bit overwhelmed.

3. Did you find the second person chapters distracting or did they help anchor your to Essun?

does anyone else remember when second-person was a huge fad in fanfiction, like a decade ago?? i guess you still see it sometimes but not nearly as frequently. anyway, that’s what this reminded me of. it’s… not my favorite point of view, but i actually didn’t mind it by the end of this novel. i’m not sure it helped anchor me to essun, though. i don’t think it achieved anything that couldn’t have been achieved in third or first person, but i also thought it was done well enough that it wasn’t overly distracting. it was sort of an inoffensive choice in narration, for me.

4. Were you surprised by the reveal that all three narrators were the same woman at different points in her life?

YES. i’m rarely shocked by books, but this twist i did not see coming! however, i thought it was done extremely well - there are little hints throughout the book that don’t really hit you until you get to the line about how damaya chose the name syenite. and i like how after that there isn’t a ‘reveal’ that essun is the same person; it just all sort of clicks for you in that moment. while i think the transition from damaya to syenite was handled very well, i also thought there were a lot of gaps between syenite and essun’s timelines that i hope the second book explores.

5. We get many hints of advanced technology that still lingers, and the story of Father Earth talks about environmental pollution and fracking. Do you think it’s possible the Stillness is a post-apocalyptic version of our own world? Does this tie in with the final line of the book somehow?

i was on the fence about whether it was a post-apocalyptic world or just an alternate universe, but by the end i was very convinced that it was a post-apocalyptic earth. jemisin seems like a very socially conscious woman, so it would make sense that this book could be read as a sort of ‘warning’ about what our civilization is doing to the earth. honestly i have no idea what the final line of the book means but it probably ties into the destruction of the earth somehow?!

6. Was the world building overwhelming? Did you find Appendix I and II helpful? What do you still find confusing in terms of world building?

i thought it was exceptional, and very overwhelming, all at once. things i’m still confused about: the relationship between the stone eaters and obelisks and orogenes, what exactly was in the pit thingy in the fulcrum??, what is the guardians’ goal??. i think i had more questions but i can’t think of them right now. anyway, i’m sure the appendixes would have been helpful, but i was reading this as an ebook and constantly changing the page seemed like a bit of a chore, so i just tried to figure everything out on my own, which probably took longer than it needed to.

7. Which is more menacing, stone eaters or obelisks? What do you think the purpose of the obelisks is? Why did the Guardians create them? What is the connection between the obelisks, the stone eaters, and the orogenes?

omfg i have no idea, pls enlighten me guys

8. What do you think Alabaster’s ultimate goal is? To get revenge? To start over? Why do you think the stone eaters are working with him?

……… i have no idea pls enlighten me guys

9. Are you going to read the second book in this series?

you know, i think i will! for a while i wasn’t sure i was going to, but by the end of the book i was very curious about what’s going to happen next. now that i’ve got a basic grasp on the world building and vocabulary i think the next book won’t be as challenging to read. is there an expected due date as of yet?


message 4: by Chelsea (last edited Jun 05, 2016 12:05PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Chelsea | 42 comments Mod
I read The Fifth Season a few months back (in March) as the result of a search for new sci-fi & fantasy but with more diversity and a more unique voice to it. As much as I love the genre, and fantasy is one of the major genres I read from, there is definitely a lot of white male authored fantasy that can read as very much the same. This was so refreshing because it was a major departure, with three female WoC perspectives and the prose and world building was really interesting and different from anything I had read before. I thought there was a great deal that could be discussed about the books too, but since I read them in March my memory might not be as fresh about the novel.

1. What comparisons do you see Jemisin drawing between the oppression of the orogenes and real world occurrences? How well do you think this was handled?

There were definite parallels to slavery in the way the orogenes are treated and especially the way in which they are controlled and their labour used, but only to benefit the Guardians and ordinary humans. The fact that they orogenes that have been trained are essentially forced to sleep together and breed children, who are then also raised in the Fulcrum is particularly horrific and can be viewed as a parallel to slavery. One of the questions about Burial Rites this month was whether we found it difficult to read in terms of the graphic detail and subject matter. While I did, I think there were more cases in The Fifth Season where I was horrified at the treatment of characters because of these themes of oppression and control by another group, and I found some scenes very difficult to read.

2. Did you find the prologue useful or overly expository? Was it odd to read something that seemed to be directly addressing you, the reader, in such a familiar way? Did you find it distracting or did it help pull you in?

I don't remember the prologue that clearly, but I think I found it overly expository and it took me longer to get into the book as a result.

3. Did you find the second person chapters distracting or did they help anchor your to Essun?

Rachel, I definitely remember that fanfiction fad and it was one of those things that would make me press the back button on a fic so quickly! I think it's really hard to pull off second person and I think it only partially works here. Personally, I found it much harder to be invested in the second person chapters because I found it jarred me out of the story so sharply. I actually think the second person storytelling was the main reason why I had the hardest time connecting to Essun's chapters.

4. Were you surprised by the reveal that all three narrators were the same woman at different points in her life?

I was! I definitely didn't make the connection until it was spelled out to the reader, but the hints are there, they're just so subtle that it's possible to be surprised, like I was, by the revelation. I agree which Rachel that it felt like there were some gaps between Essun and Syenite though and I would like to see those explored in the second book. I also thought that after the reveal, and when some of the common traits between Essun and Syenite begin to be seen in Essun, I liked her more as a character.

5. We get many hints of advanced technology that still lingers, and the story of Father Earth talks about environmental pollution and fracking. Do you think it’s possible the Stillness is a post-apocalyptic version of our own world? Does this tie in with the final line of the book somehow?

Like Rachel, I wasn't sure about the setting but I think it would make sense for this to be a post-apocalyptic world. I didn't put it all together, and I'm not sure what the last line means, but I gather one theory is that the stone people are trying to restore the moon? which I think fits in well with post-apocalyptic world. I'm definitely curious to see how it all plays out in the next book!

6. Was the world building overwhelming? Did you find Appendix I and II helpful? What do you still find confusing in terms of world building?

The problem with appendixes is that I only ever discover them after reading the book, so I don't find they help me much, although I did find them an interesting read with the timeline of seasons. I read enough fantasy that I didn't feel overwhelmed, but I do think that Jemisin throws a great deal at the reader very quickly so I definitely felt like there were things I missed. I don't know what to make of the obelisks or the stone eaters yet and hope we get more of that in the next book.

7. Which is more menacing, stone eaters or obelisks? What do you think the purpose of the obelisks is? Why did the Guardians create them? What is the connection between the obelisks, the stone eaters, and the orogenes?

For me maybe the obelisks? Because they're just kind of a menace, whereas at least there is a stone eater who seems helpful? I have no idea about the history of how the obelisks were created or why though, or what the connection between all three is.

8. What do you think Alabaster’s ultimate goal is? To get revenge? To start over? Why do you think the stone eaters are working with him?

Alabaster is such an interesting character, but I don't understand what he's working towards, although the summary for book two, The Obelisk Gate, says "Alabaster has returned with a mission: to train his successor, Essun, and thus seal the fate of the Stillness forever."

9. Are you going to read the second book in this series?

Yes, I will. I really want to see where this is all going. Apparently the next book is due out this August!


message 5: by Lady H (last edited Jun 06, 2016 08:47AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lady H (fyoosha) | 18 comments I looooooove this book. I read it back in november. n.k. jemisin is my favorite author and I've read all of her novels and I think she's absolutely exceptional in crafting truly diverse, creative, and refreshing fantasy. also this book really made waves in the fantasy world; it's won awards and been nominated for awards and it's on sooooo many lists!

1. What comparisons do you see Jemisin drawing between the oppression of the orogenes and real world occurrences? How well do you think this was handled?

so, like y'all said, the comparisons to slavery were pretty obvious. between the forced breeding and exploitation of labor and even down the the offensive word rogga and how difficult it was to hear for syenite (like the n-word) I also saw a direct parallel to toni morrison's beloved when syenite chooses to kill her son coru rather than have him be enslaved as a fulcrum orogene or worse (a node maintainer, which was one of the more horrifying reveals of the book). there's also the many parallels drawn by the representation of families in the fifth season, on which jemisin wrote a FANTASTIC blog post about HERE. (I really recommend y'all read this; it gives a deeper insight into the book and is really just amazing and kind of horrifying)

2. Did you find the prologue useful or overly expository? Was it odd to read something that seemed to be directly addressing you, the reader, in such a familiar way? Did you find it distracting or did it help pull you in?

so, this expository prologue is actually kind of unusual in fantasy, I think? it definitely felt unusual to me to have so much information thrown at me right away, but I think it was kinda necessary? this world isn't just Rehashed Medieval Europe Version 1238, it's totally new and different, so I think that intro was necessary so we could get our footing in this new world. it was also weird to have the narrator address me directly; I'm not sure what the goal there was. I'm guessing we'll find out later when we discover who the narrator is? is it hoa? doesn't the narrator at one point say he introduced himself to syenite as essun ten years later?

3. Did you find the second person chapters distracting or did they help anchor your to Essun?

I know n.k. jemisin said she likes trying new things in her work and hates that fantasy seems to be following a strict format so I think that was one of the reasons she incorporated it. also I think another reason is that jemisin said that she used it to get the reader to feel more connected to essun immediately (since she wasn't sure whether readers would immediately connect to a middle-aged black woman, a very rare character in fantasy). the other reason I think she said she used second person was because essun, as a mother who has just seen her son's dead body, has just undergone so much trauma that she has completely dissociated from herself, and second person was a great way to convey that. I think that worked fantastic, as you can tell that in the first essun chapters essun doesn't really have much personality of her own but by the end you can totally see bits of syenite coming out. but at the beginning, yeah, it does make sense for essun to be a shell - not only has she just gone through immense trauma, but she's spent over a decade trying to hide who she is and be someone else, anyone else.

like y'all said who knows, maybe third or first person would have worked just as well to convey trauma, but I think second person worked really well here too! that said, it was definitely odd and took a few chapters to get used to. I don't think I've ever seen second person used in a book that wasn't "choose your own adventure."

4. Were you surprised by the reveal that all three narrators were the same woman at different points in her life?

I actually wasn't! I don't know why (maybe it's because this is totally something I would pull as a writer lmao), but by like the third or fourth chapter I had already guessed that this was likely how all the narrators were connected, and so I started looking for clues right away, and found several early on. and then what absolutely confirmed it all for me was when essun remembers that someone once told her children would be the death/ruin of orogenes or something like that and in a few chapters previously alabaster had told syenite the very same thing.

5. We get many hints of advanced technology that still lingers, and the story of Father Earth talks about environmental pollution and fracking. Do you think it’s possible the Stillness is a post-apocalyptic version of our own world? Does this tie in with the final line of the book somehow?

so, yeah, I suspected this A LOT, but the only thing holding me back is that I know jemisin has previously criticized this trope. when the shannara tv series came out she said how this trope is pretty trite and how she hates that all dystopias have to take place on earth when they could just as easily take place in another world. so for that reason alone I don't think this is earth, but there are certainly enough hints in the book that one could easily think this is apocalyptic earth. and like rachel said, jemisin is definitely a socially conscious woman (her facebook page is a treasure trove of social articles), so you would expect something like that. and like, it fits so well!! idk. maybe jemisin is trolling.

6. Was the world building overwhelming? Did you find Appendix I and II helpful? What do you still find confusing in terms of world building?

quite a bit! and this is speaking as someone who reads high fantasy almost exclusively! like I said before, this isn't rehashed fantasy, but a totally new world with its own rules and laws and non-human races and it was definitely a bit much all at once! I don't think it all really clicked for me until like 3/4 of the way into the book tbh. I found the Appendix very helpful (when reading fantasy I always take a quick glance towards the back of the book to check for Appendixes, especially when reading jemisin - I think every book of hers has an Appendix?) to keep track of what everything was.

7. Which is more menacing, stone eaters or obelisks? What do you think the purpose of the obelisks is? Why did the Guardians create them? What is the connection between the obelisks, the stone eaters, and the orogenes?

the obelisks, I think. because they're just creepily floating around and eerily rising out of oceans and they're totally non-human and they're mysterious and huge and we don't know what they are! I have no idea what the purpose of the obelisks is, but I guess they're somehow tied to the stone eaters since syenite saw a stone eater inside one? as for the connection between the orogenes and the stone eaters, someone on a WIRED book club discussion said this:

I theorize stone-eaters are there to protect the planet by ridding it of its parasites, every other living thing on the surface. Unable to do this alone, they recruit the powerful yet disenfranchised orogenes, who had been so mistreated they’ve become agnostic to everyone else’s fate, even their own. For the people, stone-eaters are bad. For the planet, stone eaters are good. They’re stone-cold environmentalists!

and I guess this would make sense as to why the orogenes are using alabaster, since he seems to be the most powerful orogene on the planet. but I still think there's something more to this relationship, which according to jemisin we should find out more about in the second book, since we're getting an alabaster POV!

8. What do you think Alabaster’s ultimate goal is? To get revenge? To start over? Why do you think the stone eaters are working with him?

going off the above, I think Alabaster's ultimate goal is to start the world anew. I think he's grown so disillusioned and disgusted with the world as it is that he just doesn't give a shit anymore about anything. he just wants to end it all so the world can have a fresh start. I think we saw hints of this when alabaster was traveling with syenite; he always seemed jaded and kind of depressed, and the only time he was happy was when he and syenite were isolated on that island with innon and coru (he even wanted a second child!). now that innon is dead and coru is dead and alabaster's one shot at happiness was taken from him yet again by the world he lives in I think he's just #done.

9. Are you going to read the second book in this series?

it's coming out in august and I've already pre-ordered it! can't wait!


Maggie | 34 comments Mod
I knew this book was going to be a good discussion book! This is all so interesting. Thanks for choosing it, Chelsea, and thanks for providing the questions, Samar.

I, unfortunately, engaged with the book less than everyone who has commented above so I'm not going to give my opinion on too many of these questions. I love reading the insight you guys have though because I think it makes me connect to it more.

I don't read fantasy. Like Rachel, Harry Potter is the really the only exception to that so this really wasn't my genre. That being said, I found the book satisfying in the end and I'm interested to see where the rest of the series goes.

2. Did you find the prologue useful or overly expository? Was it odd to read something that seemed to be directly addressing you, the reader, in such a familiar way? Did you find it distracting or did it help pull you in?

I found it distracting. I'm someone who needs to connect to the characters before I can get in the story so having to wade through the exposition at the beginning made it more difficult for me to get hooked.

3. Did you find the second person chapters distracting or did they help anchor your to Essun?

I really disliked the second person chapters. Instead of making me relate to Essun more, I think it distanced me because I was so distracted by the second person. I understand what she was trying to do with it, but it didn't work for me.

4. Were you surprised by the reveal that all three narrators were the same woman at different points in her life?

I was! I didn't see that coming. Damaya and Syenite being the same person was extremely satisfying and understandable. Essun being the same woman, however, felt out of left field. I'm sure her transition into Essun will be explained more in further books but it just didn't connect for me.

6. Was the world building overwhelming? Did you find Appendix I and II helpful? What do you still find confusing in terms of world building?

I really struggled with the world building. I started reading the book on the subway when I was really busy at work so I think that hindered my ability to connect with it. I eventually had to keep the appendix open on my phone (as I read on my iPad) so that I could refer to all of the term definitions. It was only at that point that I started to connect with the story and understand it.

The main issue I had with it is that every sentence had multiple new terms. As I've said, I need to relate to characters and situations before I can be sucked in by story but the fact that I kept having to check definitions meant that I was constantly being taken out of the story.

9. Are you going to read the second book in this series?

All of my above critique is really harsh. I did find the book satisfying at the end and I'm definitely still thinking about it. She is an extremely skilled writer and she created a wholly unique world. I can't say I've ever read anything like this book.

I think I will read the second book. I'm very curious to see where she goes next. I'm also sure the next one will be easier to read now that I already know the world.


Dawn Hathaway Hi all! Sorry for the late response. I was traveling for work this past week, but I've been reading your comments and been looking forward to this discussion, because I loved the book.

1. What comparisons do you see Jemisin drawing between the oppression of the orogenes and real world occurrences? How well do you think this was handled?
The concept of guardians was chilling – as first encountered (chronologically) through the eyes of Damaya, they seem benevolent and the word can be looked at as it’s used when referring to a parental figure. Later on it definitely takes on the connotation of master, or to be more precise, guard. The guardians are the oppressors of a people they clearly don’t fully understand, despite having some ability to control their powers. They fear the orogenes and what they cannot understand, so they work even harder for absolute control. This is also clearly a narrative that that has been built up for hundreds of years. I think this is a very strong parallel to what is going on today in terms of cultural and racial violence and oppression, especially in the US. The shift in perspective from Damaya to Syenite read as a sinister, deliberate misleading on the part of the guardians that made the entire concept even worse. The children from outside the fulcrum are convinced to trust, even love, their guardian before realizing the full extent of the abuse they could eventually suffer at their hands.

2. Did you find the prologue useful or overly expository? Was it odd to read something that seemed to be directly addressing you, the reader, in such a familiar way? Did you find it distracting or did it help pull you in?
I’m kind of on the fence about the prologue. I think it was useful, but it was also overly expository. The world building in the story is so unique, I think not having it would not have done the story justice. I tend not to like to jump back and forth with glossaries, especially the first time I read a story, so I’m glad that there was some exposition that set out the place and the people. Without it, I would have been more lost. However, I agree with Rachel in that it was a little bit too much, too soon. I did really enjoy being addressed as the reader. I’ve come across a few stories where this is done very creatively and you get the sense of a “storyteller” being there. I like that perspective.

3. Did you find the second person chapters distracting or did they help anchor your to Essun?
I was a little confused by the second person chapters, simply because they came so soon after the prologue, which addressed the reader (which I loved!). I really like stories that consciously appeal to the reader and it took me a second to realize that this wasn’t what was going on here. I don’t know if it necessarily anchored me to Essun. I guess one thing the shift did was signal that something different was happening in the narrative – in this case, a time shift. The second person chapters were all in the present. I do agree with Samar, in that I did get a sense of dissociation from this, which was perfect to attribute to Essun who deliberately wanted to present an identity that was not hers.

4. Were you surprised by the reveal that all three narrators were the same woman at different points in her life?
I was surprised! Once the reveal was spelled out, more connections from earlier in the book made so much more sense, but I did not guess outright until it was specifically stated. Like many of you said, I want to know more about the transition between Syenite and Essun, which will hopefully be revealed in subsequent books. The reveal was actually what ended up anchoring me to Essun – seeing aspects of Syenite and Damaya in her.

5. We get many hints of advanced technology that still lingers, and the story of Father Earth talks about environmental pollution and fracking. Do you think it’s possible the Stillness is a post-apocalyptic version of our own world? Does this tie in with the final line of the book somehow?
I’m not entirely sure whether I definitely believe that Jemisen intended for this to be a post-apocalyptic Earth. I was so drawn in by the intricate world building that part of me wants to see this as a place distinctly different and newly created. However, that being said, whether it is or isn’t Earth (and I think this could be interpreted both ways and the story would still have a profound impact), the environmental impacts that are depicted in the story are definitely exaggerated versions of effects that are happening today as a result of human driven climate change. Whether or not this world is actually earth, what is happening there is a dire warning of what could certainly happen here without going too far beyond the stretch of imagination. I’m really interested by the final line of the book. I’m not entirely sure what it means, and I’m really curious to see this explored in future books. So, if we were to look at the Stillness as a post-apocalyptic Earth, did humans destroy the moon somehow? (Further exacerbating the environmental concerns and creating the seasons, perhaps.) If it’s a completely different world, did Alabaster (and maybe the stone eaters) find out about the existence of moons? (Maybe this was something the guardians in the fulcrum knew about, ie related to their hidden work with the obelisks, which seem kind of moon-like in a way with the gravitational pull.)

6. Was the world building overwhelming? Did you find Appendix I and II helpful? What do you still find confusing in terms of world building?
Yes, the world building was overwhelming, but that wasn’t a bad thing. It showed me that this was a completely different world than the one I know and that I had less familiarity to rely on. This took so much creativity and painstaking forethought. I loved it. I still have questions, and at some point (probably before I read the next book), it would be good to familiarize myself with the appendices. As I said earlier, I tend not to use them while reading the first time. I feel as though that pulls me out of the story a bit too much. I also think some questions, especially about the guardians and stone eaters have not been answered yet and will probably be addressed later in the series.

7. Which is more menacing, stone eaters or obelisks? What do you think the purpose of the obelisks is? Why did the Guardians create them? What is the connection between the obelisks, the stone eaters, and the orogenes?
I don’t know about menacing, but I guess I’m actually a little more wary of the stone eaters. Syenite was able to manipulate an obelisk, but the stone eaters are sentient. Not much is known about them, even about how they move, and there was a stone eater inside the obelisk. I guess I get a sense of createdness from the obelisk (whether by the stone eaters, guardians, or both), but the stone eaters are a race of their own and seem (at least to me) even more ancient than the orogenes. Hoa, of course, goes against the “menacing” vibe that seems to be projected by the others. However, there is still so much we don’t know about either one. As for the other two questions – no idea. I want to know so much more about the obelisks. I think it’s so interesting that orogenes can’t “see” them, even Syenite, though she could move it. I want to know how and why the stone eater was inside the obelisk (and who really had control over creating it). I may be completely off base, but based on the way they behave, I think the obelisks have something to do with the moon.

8. What do you think Alabaster’s ultimate goal is? To get revenge? To start over? Why do you think the stone eaters are working with him?
I think Alabaster’s goal is to start over at this point. He’s such a marginalized character and as powerful as he is, that just led to even more oppression by the social system that simultaneously fears him and wants to use him for their own gain. He is also able to see (sense?) more of what’s going on with the earth and seasons than anyone else, because of his power. When he had Innon and Coru, I think he was willing to work with what was already in place when he thought he could save them and help them survive. Now that he’s lost them, he’s willing to let go of everything and destroy what needs to be in order to begin anew. I think that may be what the stone eaters want as well, and since Alabaster is willing to sacrifice everything, including himself, he is a good ally for them. I like the idea of them being extreme environmentalists!

9. Are you going to read the second book in this series?
Yes! Before starting I wasn’t sure, because book clubs have been dragging me into too many new series lately, but I’m definitely continuing this one. I love the world, and there are so many answers I need to know. I actually went back to Amazon and preordered it as well. 


Lady H (fyoosha) | 18 comments NK Jemisin just did an interview with WIRED about this book if anyone's interested:

http://www.wired.com/2016/06/wired-bo...


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