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message 1: by د.ريمة (last edited Jun 03, 2016 08:15PM) (new)

د.ريمة (omferas) | 105 comments Do you enjoy to read a new book or an old one you read it before?.


message 2: by Eric (new)

Eric Westfall (eawestfall) | 177 comments Both.

I read 300+ books a year. As much as I enjoy new stuff, I also have favorites dating back decades that I re-read just for the sheer joy of experiencing certain scenes or chapters again, and enjoying, as well, the build-up to those moments. The first book in McCaffrey's Pern Series; Poul Anderson's High Crusade; multiple Georgette Heyer Regencies, etc., etc., etc.

Just my USD .02.

Eric


message 3: by Joy (new)

Joy Valentine (joyvalentinebooks) | 9 comments I re-read favorites along with new. The old favorites is like a comfort food.


message 4: by Gerry (new)

Gerry (gerrydowndoggmailcom) | 60 comments I rarely re-read a book. I like not knowing the ending.


message 5: by Jim (new)

Jim Vuksic The vast majority of the books I read are borrowed from the public library or my four adult children. I only purchase a book if I am sure I will read it more than once or if it is one book within a series.

To date, 110 books reside on the shelves of the bookcase in my den - 33 non-fiction and 77 fiction. All have been read more than once.


message 6: by Frances (new)

Frances Caballo (francescaballo) | 23 comments There are a few books that I do like to re-read once some time has passed. Wallace Stegner, Willian Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Raymond Carver, and Virginia Woolf are among the authors that I tend to reread.


message 7: by Maggie (new)

Maggie Anton | 31 comments Jim wrote: "The vast majority of the books I read are borrowed from the public library or my four adult children. I only purchase a book if I am sure I will read it more than once ..."

I agree with Jim on this one. I'm a big fan of our local library.


message 8: by Sally (new)

Sally (brasscastle) | 261 comments I find myself picking up books mostly second-hand, some fiction, some non-fiction, but often out of print. Sometimes the non-fiction is perhaps overly scholarly for my taste, but I always get something valuable from them. Things I learn from them sometimes inform my own writing, usually tidbits of factual information that provide a detail I need.

I have collections of novels by certain authors, three or four, again all out of print, which I re-read every four or five years. Their work inspires me not so much in its subject matter but more in how the work is handled. Upon reading my debut novel, Bead of Sand, one of my brothers told me that he found my work reminded him of Ruth Moore's novels (a 20th century novelist whose stories are about scrappy characters of the Maine coast), even though my story has neither Maine characters nor a Maine locale. I considered his comment a compliment, for my desire in writing it was to create a similar mood or atmosphere as Moore's, whose work I have admired my whole life. She is a favorite in our family.


message 9: by د.ريمة (new)

د.ريمة (omferas) | 105 comments Yeah
I think that there are some books that should be read it again.
Like some novels and research.
Remember some ideas .. or enjoy .....


message 10: by Don (new)

Don DeBon (dondebon) | 9 comments I tend to reread my favorites. After a period of time I forget the details of the book and while I may know the ending in summary, the details become fuzzy. Unless I read it several times. But even then, it is like watching your favorite movie. You may know every line by heart, yet still like to watch it. Many people see movies several times, and still enjoy them. While others hate to. To each their own. :)


message 11: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Schlichting (barbschlichting) | 3 comments I enjoy reading the book a few times because I forget that I've read it. I'll remember once I get further into it, but I pick up things that I missed the first time around. Some books, I'll never get rid of, like Louise Penny's series. How the Light Gets In (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #9) by Louise Penny


message 12: by د.ريمة (new)

د.ريمة (omferas) | 105 comments wonderful
by Don
by Barbara

What is the better, reading a large number of books.
Or take advantage of them, if we read slowly?.
Or re-read the book after the time because we may find in it something new !!!?


message 13: by Othman (new)

Othman Ouaarab (othmanouaarab) ريمة wrote: "wonderful
by Don
by Barbara

What is the better, reading a large number of books.
Or take advantage of them, if we read slowly?.
Or re-read the book after the time because we may find in it somet..."


That depends on the objective behind your reading. Reading for pleasure or for general information on a certain subject, for ex, would not necessitate really scrutiny of the text, but reading for research, for instance, needs to be fastidious.


message 14: by Whitney (new)

Whitney Moore I prefer to wallow like a hippopotamus in the Nile: putting the book aside to savor things I bump into such as "silence noisier than a waterfall" or a "what's real and what's true are not necessarily the same" (both from Salmon Rushdie in Midnight's Children ). Writing like this is food for me, so I tend to chew slowly and be mindful about swallowing.


message 15: by د.ريمة (new)

د.ريمة (omferas) | 105 comments Ouaarab
That's right

Whitney

Thank you
But I do not know
Salmon Rushdie


message 16: by Whitney (new)

Whitney Moore I had never read him either until "Midnight's Children." He is INSPIRING with imagery from an incredibly creative furnace. For me, he's as good as Thomas Mann in fueling my own little tiny fire!


message 17: by G. (last edited Jul 10, 2016 02:38PM) (new)

G. Thayer (flboffin) | 115 comments Re: Salman Rushdie (note spelling). I thought just about everyone knew who he was after he published The Satanic Verses and the Ayatollah Khomeini issued a fatwa calling for Rushdie’s death.
I saw a video of Rushie once; he was typing a novel on an old manual typewriter with two fingers. Imagine writing a 1000-page novel that way!


message 18: by Whitney (new)

Whitney Moore G. wrote: "Re: Salman Rushdie (note spelling). I thought just about everyone knew who he was after he published The Satanic Verses and the Ayatollah Khomeini issued a fatwa calling for Rushdie’s death.
I saw ..."


Aha spelling error -- thanks for that. It's typical of me; ditto typos that I don't see until I post in some irretrievable way. I've known about Rushdie since the 70s, but never gave even one thought to reading him until my husband did and recommended him highly. Thanks also for the bit about the typewriter -- maybe that explains everything. It was hard to edit back in those old days using blue pencils, scissors, and cellophane tape!


message 19: by G. (last edited Jul 10, 2016 06:46PM) (new)

G. Thayer (flboffin) | 115 comments Whitney wrote: “maybe that explains everything. It was hard to edit back in those old days using blue pencils, scissors, and cellophane tape!” Yes, I agree—but this video was aired sometime in the 2000s and was well after the epic novel that almost got him killed. BTW, if you haven't read The Satanic Verses you should. Rushdie’s powers of description are almost beyond belief.


message 20: by د.ريمة (last edited Jul 10, 2016 08:15PM) (new)

د.ريمة (omferas) | 105 comments Yes I remembered

Do you think if you found anyone was writing Unlike and against the holy books.
Without logic.
Will respect it, for example?


message 21: by G. (last edited Jul 10, 2016 08:51PM) (new)

G. Thayer (flboffin) | 115 comments ريمة wrote: "Yes I remembered

Do you think if you found anyone was writing Unlike and against the holy books.
Without logic.
Will respect it, for example?"

Many have already. I respect anyone’s right to express their opinion. I don’t have to believe them.
I myself (with my late wife as co-author) have written a book that totally destroys the canonical theology of the Christian churches: The Mind of Christ: The Truth About Jesus. But so far, nobody has put a fatwa on me. There is still time for that. LOL.


message 22: by د.ريمة (last edited Jul 10, 2016 11:17PM) (new)

د.ريمة (omferas) | 105 comments Yeah

Now people become away from religion.
That is a strange matter.
specially after the spread of freedom of opinion ...
I see that there are some people , came to prominence Because he ry to destruction of the principles of religion
  What is the purpose of all these actions only opinion?


message 23: by Whitney (new)

Whitney Moore G. wrote: "Whitney wrote: “maybe that explains everything. It was hard to edit back in those old days using blue pencils, scissors, and cellophane tape!” Yes, I agree—but this video was aired sometime in the ..."

It's on my WANT TO READ list... am planning to read it once I find it; supposedly we have a hard copy somewhere in this house!


message 24: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Goerl | 137 comments If it isn't worth re-reading, it wasn't worth reading in the first place.


message 25: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Goerl | 137 comments ريمة wrote: "Yeah

Now people become away from religion.
That is a strange matter.
specially after the spread of freedom of opinion ...
I see that there are some people , came to prominence Because he ry to de..."

In the Age of Gold, people had no need of what we call "religion" because God was at had and we were all as God. Resources were many, and there was no need to compete for them.
In the Age of Silver, we were not as God, but we remembered what it was to be as God.
In the Age of Bronze, it was harder to be as God, and getting the material needs of life took more of their lives. Only a few remembered. The many called these few "magical," and held them in high regard.
In the Age of Iron, even the memory of being as God was lost, and people became concerned only with the material aspects of life and competed over resources. Men came to dominate and formed patriarchal societies. Only a handful of people could grasp
the Godness within us all, and though they tried to show others the way, the patriarchs twisted their teachings to strengthen their hold over the masses.
Now we are returning to the Age of Bronze. People are realizing their Godness and relationship to God do not depend on the guidance of patriarchs and their interpretation of what God is. And the patriarchs, not wanting to lose the power they have held for the last 3,000 years, cry hell and damnation, trying to scare the people back into the fold.


message 26: by د.ريمة (last edited Jul 14, 2016 10:43AM) (new)

د.ريمة (omferas) | 105 comments Very good
We can say that the origin of religion from God. but people used it wrong ...
True religion:
  To love God and to be good human beings.


message 27: by Clarence (new)

Clarence Prince (clarence-prince) | 12 comments ريمة wrote: "Very good
We can say that the origin of religion from God. but people used it wrong ...
True religion:
  To love God and to be good human beings."


Yes, "To love God and to be good human being" I think that's right!


message 28: by د.ريمة (last edited Jul 14, 2016 01:01PM) (new)

د.ريمة (omferas) | 105 comments Yes
Clarence
And To love God, you have to be a good man
Thanks a lot


message 29: by Jawanza (new)

Jawanza | 1 comments I mostly read poetry. I believe good poetry should always be re-read.


message 30: by د.ريمة (new)

د.ريمة (omferas) | 105 comments Yes poems and good books


message 31: by Nagwa (last edited Jul 18, 2016 03:30AM) (new)

Nagwa Malik (nagwamalik) | 24 comments ريمة wrote: "Do you enjoy to read a new book or an old one you read it before?."

both! Love rereading my favourite books over and over again...and I think there are even more interesting new books out there worth looking into. But I'm afraid I couldn't read much of Rushdie. I am sorry and do not mean to be offensive but his writing was just not what I'd call writing..it was hard to concentrate and at the end i just put it away...and i have never put away any book in my life once i started it.


message 32: by Jaclyn (new)

Jaclyn Woods (jaclyn_w) | 417 comments Cathy, I removed your post as self-promotion is not permitted in the Author Feedback Group - sorry about that!


message 33: by G. (last edited Jul 20, 2016 06:19PM) (new)

G. Thayer (flboffin) | 115 comments I found Rushie’s writing excellent, and his powers of description are immense. I did put down one book without finishing it: George Eliot’s Middlemarch. The characters use excessive, flowery language, with many polysyllabic words. By the time I’d get to the end of a paragraph, I would forget how it started. About a third of the way through, I abandoned it. I did give up on one other book, titled The Meaning and Ends of Religion (I forget who wrote it). At the point where I realized I had read half the book and the author had not actually said anything, I threw it away in disgust.


message 34: by Simone (new)

Simone Martel | 10 comments ريمة wrote: "Do you enjoy to read a new book or an old one you read it before?."
I tend not to reread books, but when I read some old favorites aloud to my son I definitely got something new from them. Not just children's books. I read him To the Lighthouse and Dubliners and in both cases was blown away all over again.


message 35: by د.ريمة (new)

د.ريمة (omferas) | 105 comments When the memory is filled with information, I think it should be read again.
That's what gets me sometimes.


message 36: by Nick (new)

Nick Edward | 19 comments I've listened to Tom Robbins' Half Asleep in Frog Pajamas (read with panache by Barry Bostwick) about twenty times. Both men are brilliant.


message 37: by Gracie (new)

Gracie Bradford | 10 comments I especially enjoy reading new books published by my favorite authors. Occassionally, I will re-read a favorite book but not often.


message 38: by د.ريمة (last edited Aug 23, 2016 10:56PM) (new)

د.ريمة (omferas) | 105 comments Nick

Yes you are right
Gracie
This matter depending on the circumstances


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