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Picture of the Day > June 2016

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message 1: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments I promise I'll be better this month!



The Hungry Lion Throws Itself on the Antelope
Henri Rousseau
1905


message 2: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments

Song of Love
Giorgio de Chirico
1914


message 3: by Heather, Moderator (last edited Jun 05, 2016 01:42PM) (new)

Heather | 8276 comments






Verity
Damien Hirst

Verity is an allegory for truth and justice. Her stance is taken from Edgar Degas’s ‘Little Dancer of Fourteen Years’ (c. 1881). An anatomical cross- section of her head and torso reveal her skull and the developing fetus inside her womb.

Verity stands on a base of scattered legal books and holds the traditional symbols of Justice – a sword and scales. Representing truth, her scales are hidden and off-balance behind her back, whilst her sword is held confidently in her upstretched arm.

She was fabricated in bronze in over 40 individual sand castings at Pangolin Editions foundry, in Gloucestershire. Her phosphor-bronze surface is 20 millimetres thick and her internal support structure is a single piece of stainless steel. The sculpture is weather and lightning-proof and underwent extensive wind-tunnel-testing to ensure her capability of withstanding the force of high winds and sea spray. After two years of planning and production, Verity arrived in Ilfracombe in three parts in October 2012. After a week’s assembly on site, the sculpture was hoisted into final position using a 250 ton crane.


http://www.damienhirst.com/verity

"By dint of adding Old Bailey-style accessories to this Virgin, whose pose also references Degas's Little Dancer, he has transformed the sculpture, never much of a critical hit, into an allegory for truth and justice called Verity. Some people, as Hindu Akhandadhi Das said in his Thought for the Day, do not like it. But other people do. Either way, as Das noted, the sculpture is controversial and "thought-provoking". We are having a heated debate..."

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisf...

"Hirst's website notes: "Without the perfect equilibrium enacted by the scales, the sword becomes a dangerous instrument of power, rather than justice"





What is your perception? Thoughts? Ideas?


message 4: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1892 comments I like her best lying on the truck!


message 5: by Geoffrey (last edited Jun 05, 2016 03:49PM) (new)

Geoffrey | 201 comments Hector and Andromeda by De Chirico is a stronger image as is the one of the train in the background traversing the viaduct. But yours is good. For many years DC was my favorite artist of all time, but I believe I've outgrown his neurosis.


message 6: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey | 201 comments I find Verity very frightening. Shades of Alien I, II, and III.


message 7: by Dvora (new)

Dvora I find it truly ugly. It's too bad to spoil a beautiful place with such an ugly image. Too bad for those who have to drive past her every day. But if they had left it on the truck, that would have been a different story.
Heather wrote: "Verity
Damien Hirst

Verity is an allegory for truth and justice. Her stance is taken from Edgar Degas’s ‘Little Dancer of Fourteen Years’ (c. 1881). An anatomical cross- section of her head and to..."



message 8: by Heather, Moderator (last edited Jun 06, 2016 07:52AM) (new)

Heather | 8276 comments Thank you Ruth, Geoffrey, Luis and Dvora for your comments. I don't mind the side facing the viewer from on the truck, I agree. I think the 'insides' of her anatomy is truly disgusting. Not because it is accurate anatomy, because I don't have a problem seeing the human body, but portrayed this way in a huge statue that, as Dvora said people have to drive past every day, is truly sad.
I'm sure she is a huge tourist attraction and I think that is a point the city is trying to emphasize to bring tourists.
It seems more of a 'shock statement' than having any real meaning.


message 9: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments

The Ecstasy of Saint Theresa
Gian Lorenzo Bernini
1652





"Bernini's St. Theresa is often described as a gesamtkunstwerk (a German word meaning "total work of art") for the artist's incorporation of a variety of elements: sculpture, painting, and lighting effects all presented in a theatrical setting.

The Ecstasy of St. Theresa is not just a sculpture, but a total environment: Bernini designed the entire chapel, creating a veritable stage set complete with sculpted audience members.

Although some art historians insist that Bernini could not possibly have intended to imbue this subject with an erotic energy, as that would have been inconceivably heretical for that time, in reality the concupiscent implications of this work are unmistakable: the beautiful, bare-chested young angle gently opens Theresa's dress, preparing to penetrate her with his arrow, while the saint throws back her head with an expression of ecstasy.

The sensuality of the piece is directly inspired by St. Theresa's own writings, in which she describes her mystical experiences in overtly erotic terms;

"... Beside me, on the left hand, appeared an angel in bodily form... He was not tall but short, and very beautiful; and his face was so aflame that he appeared to be one of the highest rank of angels, who seem to be all on fire... In his hands I saw a great golden spear, and at the iron tip there appeared to be a point of fire. This he plunged into my heart several times ... and left me utterly consumed by the great love of God. The pain was so severe that it made me utter several moans. The sweetness caused by this intense pain is so extreme that one cannot possibly wish it to cease, nor is one's soul then content with anything but God. This is not a physical, but a spiritual pain, though the body has some share in it-even a considerable share ..."


http://www.artble.com/artists/gian_lo...


message 10: by Albin (new)

Albin Winters | 100 comments Dvora wrote: "I find it truly ugly. It's too bad to spoil a beautiful place with such an ugly image. Too bad for those who have to drive past her every day. But if they had left it on the truck, that would have ..."

Has Hirst ever done anything but prove that the Emperor often has no clothes? Give me Bernini any day!!


message 11: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments

Afghan Girl
Steve Mccurry

"Steve McCurry was born on February 24, 1950 in Pennsylvania, attended Penn State University. Steve McCurry (born February 24, 1950) is an American photojournalist best known for his photograph, "Afghan Girl" that originally appeared in National Geographic magazine. He originally planned to study cinematography and filmmaking, but ended up getting a degree in theater arts and graduating in 1974. He became interested in photography when he started taking pictures for the Penn State newspaper The Daily Collegian. After working at Today's Post in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania for two years, he left for India to freelance. It was here that McCurry learned to watch and wait on life. “If you wait,” he realized, “people will forget your camera and the soul will drift up into view.”

http://webneel.com/famous-photographers


message 12: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey | 201 comments I understand that the photo he took of this young woman was one of the last on his roll of film. More recently he went back to look for her and had an extremely difficult time doing so.


message 13: by Dvora (new)

Dvora One of the great photos.
Heather wrote: "Afghan Girl
Steve Mccurry

"Steve McCurry was born on February 24, 1950 in Pennsylvania, attended Penn State University. Steve McCurry (born February 24, 1950) is an American photojournalist best k..."



message 14: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments

"A masterpiece of Islamic architecture, the Dome of the Rock is a 7th century building, located in Jerusalem. Built by Caliph Abd al-Malik between 687 and 691, the octagonal plan and the rotunda dome of wood are of Byzantine design. The Persian tiles on the exterior and the marble slabs that decorate the interior were added by Suleiman I in 1561.

The oldest extant Islamic monument, the Dome of the Rock has served as a model for architecture and other artistic endeavors for over a millennium."/>

http://www.creativebloq.com/architect...








message 15: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1892 comments So beautiful, Heather.


message 16: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments

Carl's Billions
Ed Smiley
2015

" I believe in the elusive, the poetic, in ecstasy and joy.
I explore the interconnectedness of things, for I believe that everything is connected. I believe in things that can't easily be put into words.
I aim for a paradox of the intricate and the broadly gestural: inviting the viewer into a vivid disjunction of non-locality through abrupt and colorful rhythmic shifts.

My art practice incorporates acrylic transfer of digital printing and xerography into a acrylic painting, as well as inclusion of drawing media, and transferred paint skins. I use scanners and hand movement to produce digitally modified images, gestural yet unpainted, and combine them in overlays with glazes and painted gesture. Image sources for digital distortions can be other paintings, fabrics, and found objects."


--Ed Smiley
http://www.edsmileysart.com/artist-st...


message 17: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments Ruth wrote: "So beautiful, Heather."

Thank you, Ruth. I think so, too!


message 18: by Dvora (new)

Dvora Beautiful!
Heather wrote: "Carl's Billions
Ed Smiley
2015

" I believe in the elusive, the poetic, in ecstasy and joy.
I explore the interconnectedness of things, for I believe that everything is connected. I believe in th..."



message 19: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments

Agony (The Death Struggle)
Egon Schiele
1912
Expressionism


message 20: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments Luís wrote: "Heather wrote: "Agony (The Death Struggle)
Egon Schiele
1912
Expressionism"

I truly love Schiele!"


Me too


message 21: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments

"Joe Rosenthal's 1945 photograph of U.S. troops raising a flag in Iwo Jima during World War II remains one of the most widely reproduced images. It earned him a Pulitzer Prize, but he also faced suspicions that he staged the patriotic scene. While it was reported to be a genuine event, it was the second flag-raising of the day atop Mount Suribachi. The first flag, raised hours earlier, was deemed too small to be seen from the base of the mountain."

http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/01/world/g...


message 22: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1892 comments An iconic photo, and I'm old enough to remember seeing it in Life Magazine, right after it happened.


message 23: by Tom (new)

Tom So, does that make it a "staged" pic? Does it matter? I'm interested in boundaries in narrative, visual or literary, between fact and art. In this case, does a larger metaphorical truth transcend a factual one? Just curious.


message 24: by Ruth (last edited Jun 15, 2016 08:20AM) (new)

Ruth | 1892 comments It's been established that it was staged, as you put it. I think however, that th importance of that depends on the context in which you consider it.

If you view the photo in the context of art, it matters not a whit. It's a wonderfully composed and highly symbolic work.

In the context of reporting a news event, it matters some.


message 25: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey | 201 comments Why would it matter some? The first event there may not have been a photographer around or in the case of the smaller flag, not pictorially sufficient. There is nothing wrong with staging a re-enactment of an event. The gist and spirit of the event was faithfully recreated. That is the important matter.


message 26: by Dvora (new)

Dvora I don't think it matters if it was staged or not, except maybe for the Pulitzer Prize that assume it is real. But from what Heather wrote, it wasn't actually staged. Someone (I assume someone of authority) wanted a larger flag and he caught them planting that. In any case, we have thousands of paintings that memorialize or honor great events and they are not snapshots of the actual scene. Of course they can't be, but if you think of photography as art, then it's the meaning that is conveyed that is important.
Tom wrote: "So, does that make it a "staged" pic? Does it matter? I'm interested in boundaries in narrative, visual or literary, between fact and art. In this case, does a larger metaphorical truth transcend a..."


message 27: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1892 comments It was a little more staged than that. Dvora. If I remember correctly, Rosenthal directed the pose and took several different shots.


message 28: by Dvora (new)

Dvora I wouldn't know; I was just going by what Heather had posted. In any case, there's something about it that reminds me of the painting Liberty Leading the People by Delacroix.
Ruth wrote: "It was a little more staged than that. Dvora. If I remember correctly, Rosenthal directed the pose and took several different shots."


message 29: by Geoffrey (last edited Jun 15, 2016 08:45PM) (new)

Geoffrey | 201 comments Ruth wrote: "It was a little more staged than that. Dvora. If I remember correctly, Rosenthal directed the pose and took several different shots."

Again, so what. Some of the best photographs ever taken were staged. Again, it's the spirit of the momentous event that is recreated. If a painter can paint out of his imagination like Dali, Bosch and Brughel, why can't a photographic artist do the same? Is photography to be restricted to a veracity the other plastic arts are not subjected to? My goodness, we would have to discard Cindy Sherman's work, Crewdson, Andy Goldsworthy, and thousands more. Why, every manipulated photograph ever made would end up in the trash heap of pictorial history. And why in the world shouldn't journalism be allowed the same freedom as long as the spirit of the event be depicted? And as far as journalism is concerned check out decades of the covers of our newsweekly magazines, Time, US and World Report and Newsweek. Fie on staged cover shots? Those aren't journalistic truths?


message 30: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1892 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Ruth wrote: "It was a little more staged than that. Dvora. If I remember correctly, Rosenthal directed the pose and took several different shots."

Again, so what. Some of the best photographs ever..."


As I said, It matters not a whit in art. I think it matters a little in journalism because the general public approaches a news photograph thinking it's exactly what happened.


message 31: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey | 201 comments And in the case of the flag on Iwo Jima, it did happen albeit with a smaller flag. I don't think the general public would feel hoodwinked by a "false" photo. Anyone who is savvy would suspect it's reenactment, and those that aren't could care less. It showed the triumph of the American spirit in a costly world war. That is what was behind the photo's significance.


message 32: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments This is a wonderful discussion. Thank you!


message 33: by Ruth (last edited Jun 18, 2016 10:38PM) (new)

Ruth | 1892 comments Geoffrey wrote: "And in the case of the flag on Iwo Jima, it did happen albeit with a smaller flag. I don't think the general public would feel hoodwinked by a "false" photo. Anyone who is savvy would suspect it's ..."

I agree. Geoffrey. It is an important and beautifully composed photograph, and its being posed doesn't detract from that. That's why I think it matters only a little. And mostly to those who want to believe that all news photos are exactly as they occurred, never realizing that almost all photos are composed either in the camera frame or by being crippled.

Ha. Coming back to say that "crippled" is a fantasy of the autocorrect on my iPad. What I meant was "cropped."


message 34: by Dvora (new)

Dvora Ha! I wondered what you meant by crippled.
Ruth wrote: "Geoffrey wrote: "And in the case of the flag on Iwo Jima, it did happen albeit with a smaller flag. I don't think the general public would feel hoodwinked by a "false" photo. Anyone who is savvy wo..."


message 35: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey | 201 comments One of the most fantastic posed photojournalist photos ever is Ruth Orkin's image of a young American art student passing through an intersection in a European city with several men whistling her.


message 36: by Heather, Moderator (last edited Jun 19, 2016 10:56AM) (new)

Heather | 8276 comments

American Girl in Italy
Ruth Orkin
Florence, Italy 1954

In 1951, Life sent her on assignment to Israel. From there she went to Italy, and it was in Florence that she met Jinx Allen (now known as Ninalee Craig), a painter and fellow American.

The two were talking about their shared experiences traveling alone as young single women, when my mother had an idea. “Come on,” she said, “lets go out and shoot pictures of what it’s really like.” In the morning, while the Italian women were inside preparing lunch, Jinx gawked at statues, asked Military officials for directions, fumbled with lire and flirted in cafes while my mother photographed her. They had a lot of fun, as the photograph, “Staring at the Statue”, demonstrates. My mother’s best known image, “American Girl in Italy” was also created as part of this series.




Staring at the Statue

http://www.orkinphoto.com/photographs...


message 37: by Dvora (new)

Dvora Thanks Geoffrey and Heather for those.


message 38: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments Luís wrote: "Venetian Canal

Alfred Stieglitz

1894"


That's cool, Luis!


message 39: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1892 comments Luís wrote: "Venetian Canal

Alfred Stieglitz

1894"


Gorgeous


message 40: by Dvora (new)

Dvora That's gorgeous.
Luís wrote: "Venetian Canal

Alfred Stieglitz

1894"



message 41: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey | 201 comments Thanx, Heather. I was too lazy to go retrieve the photo. I hoped you would and post it, saving me the effort. I love that shot. And although many women in Rome have been catcalled, groped and objectified to a much greater degree, there's a sanitized aspect to this photo that makes it charming. The men aren't leering, but simply flirting.


message 42: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments I know first-hand about the 'touchy' Italian men. It's true. This photo is charming


message 43: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments And you're welcome!


message 44: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey | 201 comments My mom visited Rome in her 50's and a lothario came up to her and put his arm around her! She was flattered.


message 45: by Dvora (new)

Dvora I think, in the context of what is a macho culture, that is is meant to be flattering.


message 46: by Ed (last edited Jun 21, 2016 10:11PM) (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Heather wrote: "Carl's Billions
Ed Smiley
2015

" I believe in the elusive, the poetic, in ecstasy and joy.
I explore the interconnectedness of things, for I believe that everything is connected. I believe in th..."


Gosh [[ blushing ]]


message 47: by Heather, Moderator (last edited Jun 22, 2016 06:57AM) (new)

Heather | 8276 comments “Only those beneath me can envy or hate me. I have never been envied nor hated; I am above no one. Only those above me can praise or belittle me. I have never been praised nor belittled; I am below no one.”
― Kahlil Gibran

“Never measure the height of a mountain, until you have reached the top. Then you will see how low it was.”
― Dag Hammarskjöld

Poetry is Art!


message 48: by Heather, Moderator (last edited Jun 22, 2016 07:03AM) (new)

Heather | 8276 comments Luís wrote: "Venetian Canal

Alfred Stieglitz

1894"


Although the picture posted by Luis isn't the Bridge of Sighs in Venice, the photo reminded me of it:



Bridge of Sighs
John Singer Sargent



Ponte dei sospiri

"The view from the Bridge of Sighs was the last view of Venice that convicts saw before their imprisonment. The bridge name, given by Lord Byron as a translation from the Italian "Ponte dei sospiri" in the 19th century, comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of beautiful Venice through the window before being taken down to their cells. In reality, the days of inquisitions and summary executions were over by the time the bridge was built and the cells under the palace roof were occupied mostly by small-time criminals. In addition, little could be seen from inside the Bridge due to the stone grills covering the windows.

A local legend says that lovers will be granted eternal love and bliss if they kiss on a gondola at sunset under the Bridge of Sighs as the bells of St Mark's Campanile toll."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridge_...


message 49: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8276 comments Luís wrote: "Beautiful, Heather! Painting is also an art.."

Yes, you're absolutely right, Luis. It is the most popular medium in art, I think, but there are many art forms that I think we all can appreciate. Just thought I'd add a different form today!

Bridge of Sighs
John Si..."


message 50: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1892 comments Heather wrote: "I know first-hand about the 'touchy' Italian men. It's true. This photo is charming"

Italy has nothing on public transportation in Mexico City. I think I broke the guy's toe.


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