New Providence Memorial Library's Online Reading Group discussion

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message 1: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
It has been way too long since I've been on this page! Other stuff has taken me away but I am resetting my to do list and so here goes.

This month's TTBC selection is Atul Gawande's Being Mortal which I have just started reading. So far, it is a thoughtful book which seems to require absolute silence to read - at least for me. No reading in the waiting room. The book addresses medicine's inadequate handling of end-of-life issues for elderly and inform patients.

I am also reading Morgue by Dr. Vincent Di Maio. He is a retired medical examiner who has been brought in as an expert on many of the highest profile cases in recent memory. The book opens with his testimony on the Trayvon Martin murder investigation. Other chapters deal with seemingly benign female serial killers and I am in the middle of the story of Lee Harvey Oswald's exhumation.

Both books offer very different views about death, the one from the perspective of a doctor pledged to preserve life to the best of his ability. The other offers a view of a doctor pledged to allow the bodies to speak for themselves as to the manner and cause of death.

I have not yet got far enough in to Being Mortal to get a strong feel for whether or not reading these 2 books in tandem will enhance and/or inform them in a different way than if I'd read them separately. But you'll be hearing more about that next week.

What about you all? Have you ever read books together that complimented eachother or that didn't?


message 2: by Judy (new)

Judy | 28 comments Now that you bring that idea to light, I just finished The Last Englishman. It's a recounting from an Englishman who hikes the Pacific Coast Trail in its entirety. The companion book I want to read next is Wild. I think the perspective of male/female adventures will be interesting. Stay tuned for more on that one.


message 3: by Rosanne (new)

Rosanne | 67 comments I am not reading books that compliment each other, but do want to note that I am listening to the audio book of Being Mortal, which I checked out on ElibraryNJ. I listen when I'm doing mindless tasks in the kitchen, and am finding this works. Finding it very worthwhile both from the standpoint of the child of an elderly parent and as an aging person myself! Lots of good information, I think it should be required reading.

Just finished Jim Harrison's novellas, The Ancient Minstrel, which I got off the new book shelf. Have been reading about this author who died recently. He writes wonderfully, but I wonder if anyone else who has read his stuff has some ideas about the whole lust thing. I found the last story, The Case of the Howling Buddhas, disturbing.


message 4: by Rosanne (new)

Rosanne | 67 comments Living and Dying in Brick City, and The Other Wes Moore The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates definitely complimented each other. Both about young men who grow up in inner cities and succeed despite what's going on around them. And what makes that possible.


message 5: by K (new)

K | 33 comments If I'm reading 2 or more books at once, it's usually because they're very different. So, no, can't say I read "complimentary" titles. My latest binge reading is working my way through Clive Cussler's Isaac Bell series. The history/descriptions are interesting, especially as I work in Jersey City (via Hoboken). Makes me want to put looking up some real pix/history on my "to do" list.


message 6: by Sangeeta (new)

Sangeeta | 156 comments I read a book and listen to an audio book at the same time ( only while driving, which i do a lot) and they rarely "complement" each other. In fact, what works for me is when one is fiction and the other non-fiction. They're easier to keep separate. ;-)

My kids are reading 1984 now in high school, which prompted me to go back to it, after 30+ years (!) so i'm listening to that, and reading Elizabeth Gilbert's "The Signature of All Things" which is very enjoyable so far.


message 7: by Karen (new)

Karen Thornton (karenstaffordthornton) | 65 comments On the latest New York Times podcast, a commentator mentioned "reader's block," which is similar to writer's block although in this case you can't find a book you can just dive into. I'm in that phase right now. I'm actually finishing up Leah Remini's Trouble Maker, which is perfectly adequate. I'm hoping to get into Ann Sexton's daughter's memoir called Searching for Mercy Street. I did read A Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton, which I absolutely loved. Manor houses in Cornwall, English gardens, and secrets...I ate it up.


message 8: by Sangeeta (new)

Sangeeta | 156 comments "reader's block" - hmmm, sometimes it does feel like I go through a phase of one mediocre (or lousy) book after another ! less common but occasionally, it goes the other way, lots of good or great books in a row.


message 9: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 143 comments K wrote: "If I'm reading 2 or more books at once, it's usually because they're very different. So, no, can't say I read "complimentary" titles. My latest binge reading is working my way through Clive Cussler..."

I am listening to my first Isaac Bell book, "Gangster" or title like that. I love it when a book has me going to the computer to find out if the story is true. I think I remember that The Black Hand in NYC eventually became knows as the Genovese family but not sure. My parents (Dad 1st generation Italian; Mom Irish) initially met some resistance from family when they dated and married. That was back in the early 1940's in lower Manhattan.


message 10: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 143 comments I often find that after reading or listening to a really good book (Does not happen as often as I'd like!) the next few things I pick up just don't interest me or are not good IMHO. Sometimes I feel that I should give them a second chance but there's "too many books, too little time' to try to read something that I rejected.

Which brings me to a question:
Anyone read something lately that was difficult to put down?
I'm currently reading "Glory Over Everything: Beyond The Kitchen House" and I've been driven to keep picking it up. Partly because of the story but also mainly because it's a new book and due back at the library!


message 11: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 143 comments Sorry - I got distracted and never answered the original question.
I rarely read two books at the same time about the same subject. I've normally got at least one book going and one audio but they have to be different subject matter and/or one NF and one fiction.
Only time it's more than one about the same subject is when, for instance, I'm researching something and will have two or more NF books.
Or, for example, I'm reading historical fiction about a painter. Then, I'll get a book about his or her paintings to look at them while reading the novel.
I might read books right after the other like in the case of re-reading "To Kill a Mockingbird" last year for a book group. I then read "Go Set a Watchman" right after that.


message 12: by Rosanne (new)

Rosanne | 67 comments Marilyn wrote: "Sorry - I got distracted and never answered the original question.
I rarely read two books at the same time about the same subject. I've normally got at least one book going and one audio but they..."


I read Mockingbird and Watchman back to back too. The best thing about that was re-reading Mockingbird. It didn't bother me so much that Atticus was a racist, which was the reaction I kept reading, but that Scout was such a twit.


message 13: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 143 comments Rosanne wrote: "Marilyn wrote: "Sorry - I got distracted and never answered the original question.
I rarely read two books at the same time about the same subject. I've normally got at least one book going and on..."


BH library just had a discussion on Watchman and it was generally liked. I had no problem of Atticus being a racist and thought, as most in the group, that one has to take into account the place and time in history.


message 14: by Marie (new)

Marie | 92 comments Hi! Everyone. Welcome back. I am just about finished with Ken Follett "Fall of Giants" (disc 22 of 24) which is book one of the Century Trilogy. I was hesitant to start this, but every other book I have read or Showtime Special Series has been wonderful.
In between the Century stories, I lighten up the listening after being hooked on M.C. Beaton's long running series of everyone's favorite flaming red-haired Scottish Bobby Hamish MacBeth. The stories are wonderful, fun read and the characters are amazing. I just love his strange blue-eyed dog Lugs and the wild lynx cat, Sosie, that has adopted the 2 misfits. I promised to totally step out of my comfort zone and listen/read books that were never even an option in the past. MacBeth is very similar to Columbo as he seems the least lightly to solve a mystery, but always finds the bad guy and foils his arch-enemy chief inspector that is just trying to find anyway to promote him to a desk job in a major city and take him away from the highlands he loves so much. MacBeth keeps giving someone else (often the Chief himself) credit for solving the murder so he can continue to work/live in the sleepy town on the Fjords. Warning: Must read in order, and some are out of print. I working my way to Death of a Dentist. LOL
For my Longmire friends, Season 5 is scheduled to stream on Netflix Sept. 12. Craig's new Longmire "The Highwaymen" came out last week per Craig on Facebook.

For those with Netflix, I recommend "The Tudors". Absolutely excellent 4 seasons about Henry VIII and his wives. Loved it totally! Also consider Bloodline on Netflix/Showtime. It is a modern "Cat on the Hot Tin Roof" but takes place in the Keys in modern day Florida and domineering "Big Daddy" with all the cast of family characters in a totally dysfunctional family with some very big secrets and disasters. Nominated for 5 emmys the first year.
I have to think some more if I have read books that share similar places and times events from different perspectives.


message 15: by Marie (new)

Marie | 92 comments I promised I would think twice about reading "Watchman", but I gave in and read both in order of publication. My thoughts. Attica's racism is just typical of era and the place in the South. I think miss he is also racist in Mockingbird. THE WHOLE issue is does a white and black man have the same legal rights as a human being. THAT is what is the door/brain opener. Blacks had no rights, and no law protected them against beatings, rape, lynching and general cruelty. HOWEVER, placing the books side by side, I think they were written by 2 different people. If you read for sentence structure, grammar, linguistics, word grouping, as well as speech pattern, they are not the same in both books. AND the story telling does not follow the same pattern in both books. I think Harper's Sister may have played a very large role in Mockingbird and I would love to know a professionals opinion that has the to skill set to see this better than me.


message 16: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
Judy wrote: "Now that you bring that idea to light, I just finished The Last Englishman. It's a recounting from an Englishman who hikes the Pacific Coast Trail in its entirety. The companion book I want to read..."

Sounds like a great pairing! Let's hope the Englishman isn't as self-destructive as Ms. Strayed. And better prepared! She's lucky that she didn't come to any serious harm.


message 17: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
Sangeeta wrote: "I read a book and listen to an audio book at the same time ( only while driving, which i do a lot) and they rarely "complement" each other. In fact, what works for me is when one is fiction and the..."

Have had Signature on my pile for awhile. I just keep getting put off by the fact that the same author wrote Eat,Pray,Love which I did not find to be something that interested me. When I've heard Ms. Gilbert speak usually w/ Lenny Lopate, she always comes off as being intelligent and insightful. So, it remains on the pile.


message 18: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
Karen wrote: "On the latest New York Times podcast, a commentator mentioned "reader's block," which is similar to writer's block although in this case you can't find a book you can just dive into. I'm in that ph..."

Karen, I am going to put you on hold for Morgue. You have read some "death" books lately and you might find this entertaining. It's a true crime book from another angle and reveals truths that we don't hear or that get buried in all the sensational coverage.


message 19: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
Marilyn wrote: "Sorry - I got distracted and never answered the original question.
I rarely read two books at the same time about the same subject. I've normally got at least one book going and one audio but they..."


You've just explained the theory behind hyperlinks and why it's called The World Wide Web - or used to be.


message 20: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
Marie wrote: "Hi! Everyone. Welcome back. I am just about finished with Ken Follett "Fall of Giants" (disc 22 of 24) which is book one of the Century Trilogy. I was hesitant to start this, but every other book I..."

Glad to hear the positive behind MC Beaton. To me, she's just a shelf hog...;-) Sounds like a BBC mini-series for the future.


message 21: by Sangeeta (new)

Sangeeta | 156 comments I decided to keep my impression of Atticus Finch intact and eschew reading "Watchman." After all , the whole point of "Mockingbird" was to portray honor, goodness, and determination in the pursuit of justice amidst hatred and bigotry. So the idea of AF becoming a racist is too disturbing for me. ( Of course there were additional themes, such as (lost) innocence of children, and the often wrong assumptions we make about the unknown. )

Marie, I have heard from a few reviews that that the 2nd book was inconsistent in style from the original. The extreme personality change of Atticus from book 1 to 2 was just not plausible. So perhaps there was a second author meddling with Lee's legacy in a quest for undeserved riches? Ironic ! :- (

Scout was a "twit" in the 2nd book ? haha, another reason for me to avoid it.


message 22: by Sangeeta (new)

Sangeeta | 156 comments Lisa, i'm about 100 pages in and am LOVING this book !!

The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert


Karen, i think you will enjoy "STIFF: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers" by Mary Roach !

Stiff The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach


message 23: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
Marie wrote: "I promised I would think twice about reading "Watchman", but I gave in and read both in order of publication. My thoughts. Attica's racism is just typical of era and the place in the South. I think..."

There have been comparisons between TKAM & In Cold Blood written by Ms. Lee's friend, Truman Capote. No similarity. And lots of ink about how Capote did not help write TKAM. And more ink speculating whether Lee helped write In Cold Blood since she did have a large hand in the research. No resolution yet.


message 24: by Karen (new)

Karen Thornton (karenstaffordthornton) | 65 comments Thank you, Lisa! The death books always seem to find me.....;)

A TV show that I got absolutely addicted to is The Affair. The show does an amazing job with characterization and showing things from different perspectives. Memory can be completely unreliable.

The Elizabeth Gilbert book is also on my list. And I think I'm going to pick up The Goldfinch. It's on too many must read lists for me to not give it a try.


message 25: by Marie (new)

Marie | 92 comments Spoiler alert: DO NOT READ IF YOU ARE WATCHING THE AFFAIR OR PLAN TO DO SO

Karen I binged The Affair while I was house/pet sitting for a friend and was amazed at the different perspectives and how total selfish both these people were/are. I thought the ending was totally relevant as they both knew they were lying about the real facts (he did NOT want to be committed to her absolutely and wanted to go to France to write his next book and have multiple affairs as he confessed to his therapist) and she knew the baby was not his (he already had 4 kids by a wealthy socialite) so even their marriage started out based on lies. The interesting thing that made the series a success, was the depiction of how an Affair destroys so many lives because of the deceit and lies and destruction of trust, loyalty and faithfulness for their own selfish needs.


message 26: by Rosanne (new)

Rosanne | 67 comments Marie wrote: "I promised I would think twice about reading "Watchman", but I gave in and read both in order of publication. My thoughts. Attica's racism is just typical of era and the place in the South. I think..."

I had the same reaction. I was thinking Truman Copote but didn't compare styles.


message 27: by Rosanne (new)

Rosanne | 67 comments New Providence wrote: "Judy wrote: "Now that you bring that idea to light, I just finished The Last Englishman. It's a recounting from an Englishman who hikes the Pacific Coast Trail in its entirety. The companion book I..."
My husband, an experienced hiker, says by all rights she shouldn't have survived the Pacific Trail.


message 28: by Marie (new)

Marie | 92 comments Hi! Years ago, I did a lot of camping and hiking so I was interested in both "The Wild" and Robert Redford/Nick Nolte's "A Walk in the Woods" so I watched both about 2 weeks apart. The Wild was just NOT plausible in that she was so
unprepared and lacked the experience to have survived as long as
she did. I so agree with Lisa's husband. Just the fact her provisions were so poorly selected and the blister's alone should have been the tip off this was such a bad idea. The whole thing was just not believable to anyone that has done 3-4 days of serious hiking and camping the trail as well. A Walk in the Woods was based on a true story, but the guys were in their 40's not 70's, so the Suspension of Disbelief has to be dangled often and let the comedic over tones be the plot line as a bucket list of the re-union of 2 old friends re-uniting after a bad falling out.
Regardless East Coast or West Coast, both trails have some serious points of difficulty where incredible endurance over-coming weather and terrain is not for any amateur. So on that note, the Wild was just not possible and Redford had written A Walk in 1998 for him and Newman to have a last reunion on film and never made it happen.


message 29: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
I am an experienced hiker - although not camper - and I was pretty aghast at the whole thing. However, Ms. Strayed was reckless with her safety before she even hit the trail so her behavior was consistently bad both in the wilderness and back in civilization.


message 30: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
I'm in the process of finishing up Being Mortal. It is upsetting that many of the questions Dr. Gawande raises about quality of end-of-life and how we handle the elderly were not able to be answered by his family without considerable pain, suffering and bad treatment despite being physicians. If he and his parents, both doctors, cannot ask the right questions and know when to question treatment decisions and assumptions then what is the hope for the rest of us?

It is a sobering book, very familiar to those of us who have cared for aging parents, spouses or friends and loved ones with terminal illnesses. One can only hope that it will start to bring about discussions and changes - or perhaps the rising tide of baby boomers will demand better treatment.


message 31: by Marie (new)

Marie | 92 comments I so agree with your comment about the Wild. Just a bad concept and a bad movie.
We have come a long way since the days of not telling a relative they had cancer or were dying. THAT to me was criminal. Now, we have another set of problems. Last time I was in the hospital, a 94 year old man with metastasized cancer was being operated on to remove a tumor. A older diabetic shattered a hip and the doctors were trying to convince the family that a full hip replacement would not heal because she was so easily agitated and too high risk for a repeat fall and break replacement etc. The family insisted on the surgery so she could walk. They were looking at the burden on them, NOT the over all scope of the problem. Do you remember the time when people got dressed up to go to the doctor? Now I hear them telling the doctor WHAT they WANT, and have no clue about medicine or their own bodies. In pain management I hear patients telling the doctor they need MORE meds and the doctor telling them he can NOT prescribe MORE if they are not doing PT and I hear them say, well, I'll go some where else. My thoughts are good riddance to a potential time bomb for over dosing. The patient acts like they are doing the doctor a favor by being their patient. Things have truly changed in patient care and respect for doctors and nurses. AND I can understand why, when Ins. companies dictate treatment, procedure and duration of care like we are only a machine that needs a grease job, oil change or a new part. The humanity in treatment is disappearing. Check out any chemo ward and look at the expressions on people's faces. It is all so sad. Patient # 17 can go to chair 5, nurse will be with you in 10 minutes. Then the double and triple check of your name tag, treatment chemo bag is double checked to be sure the correct one with your name, doctor's name and your ID #. Everything becomes a number. Afterwards they give you ginger ale, and a small piece of pound cake or cookies before the chemo makes you so sick you can't keep any food down. I've seen patients actually get excited because their hair didn't all fall out, or the chemo only made them sick for 3 days this time, or their sense of smell if coming back.
I've gone to the hair salon in Elizabeth that makes wigs for chemo patients and the women/men that make them. I've met a tattoo expert that does beautiful nipple tattoos that are completely life like. ALL of these things help the patient have some feeling or normalcy, but the issues of treatment alternatives, end of life discussions, and refusal of treatment, are not even on the plate. If the patient refuses AMA suggested course of treatment, they are labeled difficult, and flagged as against medical advice. I have thought about this, and I do not want chemo, radiation and massive surgeries to what, extent my life 3-6 months, but be miserable the entire time? Be so doped up or in such pain that you want death? Not be able to question the doctors about alternatives because then you are a difficult patient. I think Lisa is on target. The Baby Boomers have to start asking hard questions and demand better alternatives, including no treatment as an option. I watch a friend's wife with Stage 4 pancreatic cancer go threw EVERY course of treatment, in horrible pain, you name it, because the doctors kept using the cure word. NOT once did they bring up death "because they refuse to accept that." WTH??? They refused to accept that? What is this BS? She did not have ONE day after she started another round of chemo for liver cancer that she had any joy and was pain free, not one day. BUT she lived 3 months longer than they expected, so the treatment was deemed a success. ON what scale does that make any sense? We must seriously look at the role Ins. companies/Big Pharma plays in treatment and take that power away. Let the doctors make the decisions with the patient/family and not be penalized because they refused chemo and/or radiation or massive surgery. When doctors hands are tied, they are frightened of law suits or their licenses sanctioned because they did not followed protocol, then we have bigger problems then most people realize until they are in that very situation we all fear. We have to be able to look at alternatives, as well as no treatment and it not be held against us or make us a bad person. Parents have NO rights to refuse treatment, even when the situation is hopeless. I've have seen that 2 more times than I wish I had. It was just terrible to watch both the parents and child suffer to the very end. Things have to change.


message 32: by Karen (new)

Karen Thornton (karenstaffordthornton) | 65 comments Another book that deals with this same subject is In the Midst of Life by Jennifer Worth, the author of the Call the Midwife series. I could only take it piece by piece because the reality of this situation has been going on for quite some time and hasn't changed.

I think that hospitals are required to treat people when they're brought in, so just going into the hospital will necessitate the doctors trying to prolong your life. I think many people in the "olden days" took to their beds to die because they knew it was going to happen. But families used to be close in proximity, where now people live so far from each other.

Are we going to have a summer get together like we've had in years past? I've always enjoyed those!


message 33: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
Well, I hadn't planned one but I could probably poll the group here and see if you are all interested. What does everybody - except Karen - think? I don't like to make people feel that they have to come. An alternative is also to do another Book Circle event in the Fall - probably mid-October during National Book Group month. I think I had that on my radar as a get-together event for this year.

Check out the posting on the Summer Reading Program this year as well. It's under it's own heading topic.


message 34: by Sangeeta (new)

Sangeeta | 156 comments either a summer party / fall book circle (or both !) would be fine. i would try to attend both. i have found them to be enjoyable :-)

when will the summer reading forms be available ?


message 35: by Sangeeta (new)

Sangeeta | 156 comments never mind...i got the summer form from the library website.

thanks, good challenges


message 36: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 143 comments Sangeeta - where did you find the summer form on the library website? I looked and could not find it.


message 37: by Sangeeta (new)

Sangeeta | 156 comments http://www.newprovidencelibrary.org/i...

here's the link. it was on the homepage banner that changes. it's the 3rd screen (why should kids have all the fun) and you just have to click on the bottom link where it indicates.


message 38: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 143 comments Thanks, Sangeeta. I doubt I can do many of these things before middle of August!


message 39: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
Marilyn,

Don't worry...all of you here on GoodReads get an entry just for participating here.

There are some good programs coming up, tho in July and I would recommend them to you. Next week, we have a young fellow coming in to speak about his interest in origami. He just got back from a national conference and will be speaking and demonstrating. Then on Thursday somebody will be speaking about the ideas and philosophy behind yoga. Over the following 2 weeks, we'll have a nutritionist talking about cooking w/ summer produce and bringing samples as well as another yoga instructor speaking about healing and pressure points in the body connected to different organs. An effortless check off the list!

Aside from the fact that you read one book a day, Marilyn - how could you have trouble completing a summer reading activity list!!


message 40: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 143 comments HUH? I wish I read one book a day! I've not been able to read much lately...
Think I'll jot down the dates and times of some of the programs...especially the yoga ones. I've recently taken a few chair yoga classes and they are a challenge! Who would have thought that sitting in a chair would use so many muscles?


message 41: by Marie (new)

Marie | 92 comments Hi! I would be interested in the summer cooking and yoga. Please keep me posted on when and where.


message 42: by Marie (new)

Marie | 92 comments Hi everyone. Longmire fans, Netflix will release Season 5 on Sept. 23th. AND for those of you that have Netflix, check out Grace and Frankie. I just loved it! Takes 3-4 episodes to get the plot down, but well worth it. Binged on 10 episodes in one day and was just a total hoot.
Just barely finished LaRosa, can NOT recommend. Needs a serious editor re-write, just too depressing and barely believable
at times. Starting BarkSkins now and it reminds be of the revenant before the bear attack gorgeous Leo D.


message 43: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 143 comments Marie - I'm putting that date for Longmire on my calendar!
I too enjoyed Grace and Frankie - LOL sometimes.


message 44: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 143 comments Check out the posting on the Summer Reading Program this year as well. It's under it's own heading topic.

Where would I find this topic?


message 45: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
There is a topic called Exercise Your Mind 2016 which is the theme of this year's summer reading program. I have some details there about what's involved.

I haven't figured out how to attach a document to a post here so that's why I haven't included the contest form.

As for programs, here's the dates. All program happen @ 7:30PM in the Conti Room:

Tuesday, 7/12
Matthew Au, a recent Union County Info Tech Academy graduate and NP resident will speak about his interest in origami. He attends national conferences, does intricate designs, will probably demonstrate one and may teach one.

Thursday, 7/14
Shirley Fee, a New Providence Rec Dept. yoga instructor, will speak about the philosophy and ideas behind yoga. This will include a brief meditation that is suitable for anybody. Shirley's wonderful and I highly recommend her!

Tuesday, 7/19
Jennifer Luster is nutritionist from Shop Rite Chatham coming with samples to talk about Cooking with Summer Produce & Herbs. Let me know if you're coming so I can give her a count.

Tuesday, 7/26
Judy Parenti, another NP Rec Dept. instructor will speak about healing properties of yoga including pressure points related to certain parts of the body. Includes a meditation. Judy is also a fantastic speaker and all-around cool person.

Hope I get to see some of you there!


message 46: by Sangeeta (new)

Sangeeta | 156 comments i hope to be at the yoga/cooking events ! thanks for organizing.

i read the first book of several trilogies, and eventually will continue through :

sea of poppies (Amitav Ghosh) Sea of Poppies (Ibis Trilogy, #1) by Amitav Ghosh

night (Elie Wiesel) Night (The Night Trilogy, #1) by Elie Wiesel

things fall apart (Chinua Achebe) Things Fall Apart (The African Trilogy, #1) by Chinua Achebe

completed the harry potter series though !

;-D


message 47: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 143 comments I'm hoping to attend the two Yoga events.


message 48: by New Providence (new)

New Providence (npml) | 302 comments Mod
Here's an update for you to all put on your calendars:

Thursday, October 20 @ 7:30PM Great New Fiction For Book Groups
Rosalind Reisner will be returning to do a survey of books that she has read and likes for discussion. If you came last year, you know that she has an encyclopedic knowledge of fiction and is a wealth of reading suggestions. She even had Marilyn and Sangeeta stumped on some of the books she suggested! I found that really impressive!
This is for everybody who reads, whether or not you're in a book group. I'll send out many more reminders but put it on your calendar now so you don't miss it.


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