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Book of The Month Discussion > The Fellowship of the Ring - June 2016

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message 1: by Nicole (new)

Nicole  (co984life) | 115 comments Mod
Here is the thread for June's book of the month.


message 2: by Amy (new)

Amy Wishman Nalan This is my first time participating in the book club. I just finished listening to the audio book of Fellowship a few weeks ago. I've read the trilogy numerous times. I also just finished a Game of Thrones for the first time, and it is so interesting to see how influential Tolkien was in that book. Middle Earth is so amazingly detailed you immediately are immersed; which is kind of counter-intuitive.


message 3: by Matt (new)

Matt | 150 comments I'm curious, are people reading the front matter ("Concerning Hobbits," and all that), or just skipping straight to Chapter 1?


message 4: by Matt (new)

Matt | 150 comments There's a lot of good stuff there, and some interesting retcon by Tolkien. As he transitions from the Hobbit, which was sort of accidentally and peripherally connected to the larger Book of Lost Tales/Silmarillion legend he was creating, he has to reconcile some things. How Hobbits fit into the rest of the world, why they make references to a king, when the kingdom had failed centuries earlier, why we wont see trolls talking and being easily fooled anymore, and most importantly, substantially changing the story of how Bilbo gets the Ring. And he does it all in a way that fits in the universe.


message 5: by Amy (new)

Amy Wishman Nalan Matt wrote: "There's a lot of good stuff there, and some interesting retcon by Tolkien. As he transitions from the Hobbit, which was sort of accidentally and peripherally connected to the larger Book of Lost Ta..."

Matt wrote: "There's a lot of good stuff there, and some interesting retcon by Tolkien. As he transitions from the Hobbit, which was sort of accidentally and peripherally connected to the larger Book of Lost Ta..."

Matt wrote: "There's a lot of good stuff there, and some interesting retcon by Tolkien. As he transitions from the Hobbit, which was sort of accidentally and peripherally connected to the larger Book of Lost Ta..."

I did read it after I read the trilogy as a whole first. Then my interest was peaked, but I was advised against reading it first when I initially read the trilogy, and I agree with this advice.


message 6: by Matt (new)

Matt | 150 comments Yeah, I guess I agree. I think the only part that might have been necessary would be the accounting for Bilbo's false story of how he got the Ring, if you were reading this after reading the first edition of The Hobbit. But since the revised version is probably the only one people would read today, that is moot. Everything else gives you additional depth. Then when you reread, you can read the intro, and you will suddenly understand the reference Gandalf makes to Stoors, or other things you missed on your first read. I find Tolkien's works tend to benefit greatly with rereading (especially The Silmarillion), while still being extremely enjoyable on the first read.


message 7: by Rodney (new)

Rodney | 208 comments Mod
1. In what ways is The Lord of the Rings a typical quest narrative? In what ways is it not?
2. Tolkien was a devout Catholic. What elements of his novel might be traced to a Catholic worldview?
3. How is it significant that Gollum had been a hobbit before acquiring the Ring? To what degree can the Ring's powers be used for good or evil depending on the moral character of its bearer?
4. How would you explain Sam Gamgee's determination to stay with Frodo no matter what? What qualities, talents, and shortcomings does Sam reveal as the journey continues, and how is he changed by his experiences?


message 8: by Matt (new)

Matt | 150 comments is there a planned date for the show?


message 9: by Rodney (new)

Rodney | 208 comments Mod
There was. It has been pushed back. We are hoping for early next week


message 10: by Matt (new)

Matt | 150 comments cool. thanks.


message 11: by Amy (new)

Amy Wishman Nalan Rodney wrote: "1. In what ways is The Lord of the Rings a typical quest narrative? In what ways is it not?
2. Tolkien was a devout Catholic. What elements of his novel might be traced to a Catholic worldview?
3. ..."


I don't know if I am smart enough to answer all of these questions, but 4 has me thinking. Sam's extreme loyalty is the most inspiring part of the trilogy for me. He manages to stay so positive and focused. He is portrayed as "simple" in some ways, but he is able to do the most heroic things. His simplicity actually leads to his (almost) blind devotion to Frodo and their quest.


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