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Archive Buddy Reads > Buddy Read = The Fountainhead

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message 1: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5607 comments Mod
Member Lisha is looking for a Buddy to read:

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand published in 1943.

Was Ayn Rand's first major literary success.

The protagonist, Howard Roark, is an individualistic young architect who chooses to struggle in obscurity rather than compromise his artistic and personal vision.
The character of Roark was at least partly inspired by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Rand described the inspiration as limited to "some of his architectural ideas [and] the pattern of his career".

So let Member Lisha know if you are interested and when you think you can start reading together!


message 2: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
Lisha, I would be glad to be part of a buddy read, but I won't be able to start reading it until the beginning of July.


message 3: by Renaissance (new)

Renaissance Marine | 2 comments i guess i dont know what a buddy read is. i have read the fountainhead 6 times now since high school. i highly recommend it.


message 4: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (last edited Jun 02, 2016 05:47PM) (new)

Lesle | 5607 comments Mod
Renaissance wrote: "i guess i dont know what a buddy read is. i have read the fountainhead 6 times now since high school. i highly recommend it.

Good Afternoon my friend!
A Buddy Read is when one or more persons agree to read a book with you, but not enough interest for the whole group.
Rules are based between the Buddies like: when you start, how many chapters at a time, what is discussed, just comments or questions about how you feel about the book.
Others will pop in and make comments that have read the book but do not want to reread the book.

Hope that helps!


message 5: by Renaissance (new)

Renaissance Marine | 2 comments oh ok. like a really small book club. ok. well, if you want to i will be happy to read it with you. i love that book.


message 6: by K☕️ren (new)

K☕️ren | 21 comments I have wanted to read The Fountainhead as well. I listened to the audiobook of Atlas Shrugged about 7 years ago. (Audiobook was the only e option through the library at that time.)

I'm in the middle of reading another book that is on my 26 reading challenge list. But I can try to meet the agreed upon reading schedule for Fountainhead.


message 7: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine I've been wanting to read The Fountainhead for some time but I sadly won't have time till the start of August.


message 8: by Jackie (new)

Jackie | 97 comments I have been meaning to read The Fountainhead for quite some time. It is in my 'to read pile' under my bed, but somehow never makes it to the top! I think the size of it keeps putting me off. So, reading it along with other people would be great encouragement. I saw the film years ago, with Gary Cooper, have no idea how close to the book it is. I'm reading something else at the moment, but am happy to start The Fountainhead whenever.


message 9: by mollusskka (new)

mollusskka | 56 comments yes, it is a thick book and pretty intimidating for me. but i'd like to be a buddy read though i might be a little late in reading it. : )


message 10: by Eva (new)

Eva | 33 comments Hey! I'm interested in taking part in this buddy read. So, when it's gonna start? :-))


message 11: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (last edited Jun 30, 2016 02:13PM) (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
I am planning to start reading the book in about a week or so, after I get it from the library. If anyone else is interested, how does July 10 sound? Lisha is the member who recommended the book as a buddy read, so I hope you are reading this, Lisha.


message 12: by K☕️ren (new)

K☕️ren | 21 comments I'm ready to start. Rosemarie are you suggesting we start reading July 10?


message 13: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (last edited Jul 01, 2016 08:00PM) (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
I thought that July 10 was a good time to start because that gives us time to get the book. Mine is on the way to my local library branch so I should have it by then.
So we will start on Sunday, July 10. We can read at a reasonable pace. There is no need to rush because it is a long book and we want to enjoy it.

Happy reading everyone.


message 14: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
This group will be your buddy--everyone is welcome to join. It is labeled Buddy Read so it doesn't get confused with the Group Reads of the month. There is also no time limit to finishing. We can take as long as we want, and it is a long book.


message 15: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5607 comments Mod
Kimberly - wrote: "Thank you, Rosemarie, for the clarity. I look forward to reading and discussing Fountainhead with the group."

Rosemarie is right Kimberly, the Buddy Read can be as little as 2 Members up to whatever. Its for books that do not have enough interest to make it to the Group Monthly Reads, but there is still interest.


message 16: by Eva (new)

Eva | 33 comments Unfortunately, I have to take myself out of this buddy reads again. It's a bit embarrassing, but... I just can't find my copy of the book!! I know I've got The Fountainhead somewhere, but I suspect it is still in one of the boxes from our last move and they are all piled high in the cellar. Cannot bring myself to search through this mess right now, so I won't read the book anytime soon. But I'll peek in from time to time to see what you lot say. Perhaps I'll be inspired to work my way through a ton of boxes after all. :))


message 17: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
Good luck unpacking. My daughter Victoria, her husband and 3 month old baby girl moved last Friday and Victoria couldn't find her clothes, and the cutlery and dishes had boxes piled on top of them. Good luck finding the book. I imagine that I will take at least 6 weeks to read the book. Peek in anytime.


message 18: by Eva (new)

Eva | 33 comments Thanks Rosemarie. Yes, unpacking is one of my least favorite things, whether it is from a move or coming back from a trip.
I don't envy your daughter at all! All that stress and having a three month old baby to deal with as well! Hope, she's enjoying her new home anyway!


message 19: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
She is, it is a much bigger place. Now they have a balcony and this building has an elevator so she can take the baby for a walk by herself.


message 20: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
I had a question from a readee about how a buddy read works, and that made me think about how we are going to read this book. So I am asking you, would you rather:
1. Read the book so many chapters a week?
or
2.At your own pace, posting spoiler alerts if you are ahead of most of the group?

Either way is fine, we can read the book as fast, or as slowly as we want.


message 21: by K☕️ren (new)

K☕️ren | 21 comments Given the linear nature of this thread, I would recommend a schedule for reading so many chapters per week. The schedule can be defined by the book's four book parts. Either choice poses a risk of spoilers. So perhaps when posting we can indicate the part/chapter we have read up to.


message 22: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
That is a good idea, Karen. That we can all keep track of our progress, since some people have more time to read than others. My copy of the book has 763 pages.
Our goal should be to read at least 50 or so pages a week. We can always change the amount if that is too slow.
What does eveyone think-- should we do about 50 to 75 pages a week? I want everyone to enjoy the read and read at a reasonable pace too.
Usually towards the end of the book I get impatient and read faster in order to finish the book.


message 23: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
Only 3 days to go. I plan to focus on finishing books that I have on the go in the next three days.


message 24: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
Welcome readers. To make things easier for everyone, please refer to chapters when quoting or commenting, since there are so many editions of this book.
Our goal is to cover around 50 to 75 pages a week. If you are reading the book at a faster rate, please use spoiler alerts, thanks.
I look forward to reading and sharing comments with you. If you have read the book not that long ago, please feel free to share your thoughts.
Please remember--NO SPOILERS!
And more importantly--HAPPY READING!
ENJOY!


message 25: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5607 comments Mod
I would like to take a moment to Thank Rosemarie!

A member suggest this Buddy Read and has not responded since.
With Members interested, Rosemarie did not want to let it go without a discussion leader for the read.

Rosemarie, Thank you so much, I am sure Members that are joining you in this Buddy Read are very grateful too!

Happy Reading everyone!!


message 26: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
I have read two chapters so far and am enjoying it. Apparently Howard Roark was very loosely bases on the American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, whose style of architecture was something entirely new and unique in the U.S.


message 27: by Jackie (new)

Jackie | 97 comments Lesle wrote: "I would like to take a moment to Thank Rosemarie!

A member suggest this Buddy Read and has not responded since.
With Members interested, Rosemarie did not want to let it go without a discussion ..."


hear hear! thank you Rosemarie


message 28: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5607 comments Mod
Jackie, I need a like button on here! √√


message 29: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
You're welcome. I am looking forward to the discussion.


message 30: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
The three young characters that appear in the book so far are Howard Roark,
Peter Keating and in chapter 4 we meet Catherine Halsey.
The theme of modern versus imitative archictecture is continued in this chapter, as well as some aspects of Peter' character. He is a self-confessed "user" who is extremely ambitious and not overly scrupulous about his road to the top.


message 31: by Jackie (new)

Jackie | 97 comments none of the main characters seem very likeable so far. Howard Roark has a clear idea of what he wants and doesn't'want to compromise, but he doesn't'connect with anyone round him.


message 32: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
Ayn Rand created her own philosophy called Objectivism. I don't agree with her philosophy, which is very "me" centred, but her novels do make you think. I read Atlas Shrugged years ago, and even though I disagree with some of her opinions, others are certainly valid today and the plot was intriguing.
I agree with your assessment of Howard Roark. In fact, when she describes him she compares his face to rocks, and even geometic shapes. He has no softness and no interest in anything except architecture.


message 33: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
I have read the first 8 chapters and can sympathize with Howard, who has modern ideas for buildings but no one will give him the chance. He definitely takes people out of their comfort zone. The whole time this is happening he never shows his feelings and acts like it doesn't matter. But it must be eating at him seeing fools and copy- cats succeeding while he sits idle.


message 34: by Jackie (new)

Jackie | 97 comments Howard Roark is a very principled, driven man which many of those around him don't understand. they wonder why he won't compromise and adapt, in order to get on. he has met a couple of like minded souls, such as henry Cameron and Mike on the construction site. Peter Keating is fascinated by Howard Roark - he admires him, but is frustrated by him. Peter Keating is hugely ambitious, and not very principled. he treats catherine (Katie) very badly - I can't see that relationship ending up well, however she seems to put up with everything and loves him unconditionally. we don't hear her pov so not 100% sure what she really thinks. I saw the film years ago, so keep picturing Gary Cooper in my mind when I read !


message 35: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
I didn't see the film itself, but saw still photos from it, and I can see Gary Cooper in my mind as well- at times.


message 36: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
I have reached chapter 12. Peter Keating is a prime example of an ambitious hypocrite who uses other people to get ahead. Howard is an honest loner who knows he has a hard road ahead. He has made a couple of friends-Mike and Henry Cameron, but is generally a loner.
Ayn Rand depicts the reactions of the architectural establishment to Howard's work. I wonder if this is based on any specific historical figures.


message 37: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
In chapter 12 we meet Dominique Francon, the daughter of Guy Francon. IMO she is one of the most unpleasant characters I have met in any novel.
In a conversation with her boss she talks about freedom. She says she wants perfection or nothing. Since she can't have perfection, she says that to have freedom, you need :
To ask nothing. To expect nothing. To depend on nothing.

What a philosphy of life!


message 38: by Jackie (new)

Jackie | 97 comments agreed Rosemarie. I'm hoping I'll warm to her, but she is off-putting. She comes across a bit spoilt and rich - she is able to be as she is because she is not dependent on her job for money, for example. Unfortunately the characters who are very self-sufficient and independent, such as Dominique and Howard Roark, are also very indifferent towards others, not a lot of kindness is exhibited.


message 39: by Lars Martin (new)

Lars Martin (lmborlaug) | 34 comments I just started reading Atlas Shrugged. I'm about 10 pages in and loving it so far, by the way. Great style.

I wish I'd started Fountainhead, though. Would've loved to participate in the discussion. But I didn't have the book in my library. Oh well. Next time.

Have a great read.


message 40: by Jackie (new)

Jackie | 97 comments Lars Martin wrote: "I just started reading Atlas Shrugged. I'm about 10 pages in and loving it so far, by the way. Great style.

I wish I'd started Fountainhead, though. Would've loved to participate in the discussion..."


I see you're from Norway Lars, are you reading "Atlas Shrugged" in English? If so, kudos!


message 41: by Lars Martin (new)

Lars Martin (lmborlaug) | 34 comments Jackie wrote: "Lars Martin wrote: "I just started reading Atlas Shrugged. I'm about 10 pages in and loving it so far, by the way. Great style.

I wish I'd started Fountainhead, though. Would've loved to participa..."


Ha, ha. Thanks :)

Yeah. I'm reading it in English.


message 42: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
Lars, feel free to comment about Atlas Shrugged if you wish. It is the same author and it would be interesting to compare some of the characters. I read it years ago and it is quite the novel. Her philosopy is unique and she had many followers. I just like her novels, even though some of her characters are incredibly selfish.


message 43: by K☕️ren (new)

K☕️ren | 21 comments I am up to chapter 7 in Fountainhead and read Atlas Shrugged in December 2009. So I too think about the latter in relation to the former and would welcome discussion about both. It seems to me that Fountainhead is focused on the individual whereas Atlas Shrugged has groups of people of certain types, i.e., one set represents Ayn Rand's ideal in contrast to a society in opposition to her ideals. As I read about each character in Fountainhead, I'm trying to sort out where or whether they fit into the groups outlined in Atlas Shrugged.


message 44: by Lars Martin (new)

Lars Martin (lmborlaug) | 34 comments Rosemarie wrote: "Lars, feel free to comment about Atlas Shrugged if you wish. It is the same author and it would be interesting to compare some of the characters. I read it years ago and it is quite the novel. Her ..."

Thanks Rosemarie.

I've read a couple of chapters now. My impression so far is that Rand's characters are unbelievable. No human being will ever be that monochrome. They all seem to be flat characters. Everyone of them seem to be caricatures.

I know where she wants to go with this. I know it's all about objectivism. But she overdoes it, in my opinion.

On the positive side, I love her prose. She could write about paint drying or grass growing, and I would still read it. For now at least.


message 45: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
Lars, I agree. Her characters are one-dimensional and she has a definite agenda, but she certainly knows how to write.


message 46: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
Peter Keating will do anything to get what he wants. I hope there is such a thing as karma in this book, because he will deserve whatever is coming to him. (I am reading chapter 15)


message 47: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
I have just finished the first section of the book, which has very ironic speech at the archictects banquet when they speak about the future and say, "But we are willing in all humility to make way for our heirs."
In reality, they treat Howard, who is the way of the future, with derision, mockery and scorn.
The theme of this section deals with ambition(Peter Keating) and the lack of compromise to one's own principles (Howard Roark).
There may be a few Howards in the world, but there are many more Peters.

How do you feel about the characters? Are they realistic or simply symbols of her philosophy? In either case, I want to know what happens next.


message 48: by Jackie (new)

Jackie | 97 comments Peter Keating is very self-satisfied and all about himself and his own ambition. do I find him a realistic character? not entirely, surely most people are more 3 dimensional than this? I don't find that you engage with any of the characters really, but I think that's intentional - the author keeps you at a slight distance, to reflect on the ideas and not be too caught up in the characters. in spite of that you do find yourself wanting to know what comes next. I have read a bit into the next section of the book, I won't give any details here, but, having introduced all the main characters, the author now starts to bring them together , to interact with each other.


message 49: by K☕️ren (new)

K☕️ren | 21 comments The characters appear to be symbols and as I read about them I am trying to sort out what they symbolize and why. This novel does not feel realistic in any sense. I am up to Part 2 Chapter X.

"Part 1 Peter Keating" introduces us to Peter Keating and Howard Roark who represent two opposing ideas -- the ambitious, career climbing for its own sake (and it could be any career) vs the truly passionate and talented interested in the work itself. When Keating requests Roark's help, Roark fixes his designs and does not resent him for it because the work is foremost for him. Their mentors Guy Fancon and Henry Cameron seem to foretell their respective futures -- one becomes hugely successful in the field though he does not design anything and the other becomes obscure. Since this is the first of four parts, clearly more is to come.


message 50: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8299 comments Mod
I have read the first two chapters of Part 2. In the first chapter, we see more of Dominique, who is still an unlikeable character, as she encounters Howard and has no idea who he really is. In chapter 2 Peter and Ellsworth meet and seem to have clicked. It is obvious that both are phonies that have so far fooled everyone.


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