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2014 Group Read Nominations > AUGUST 2014 Group Read: East Africa & Europe/Asia

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message 1: by ConnorD (last edited Jun 05, 2014 04:35AM) (new)

ConnorD | 181 comments Please nominate for books in the following regions
1. One book from an East African author of African descent, and
2. Another from Authors of African descent from Europe/Asia

EAST AFRICA
*Notes from the Hyena's Belly: An Ethiopian Boyhood
*Waiting: A Novel of Uganda's Hidden War
*The Sad Artist and Other Fairytales


EUROPE/ASIA
*The Autograph Man
*Mr Loverman
*


message 2: by ConnorD (new)

ConnorD | 181 comments My nomination for East Africa is from Ethiopia Notes from the Hyena's Belly: An Ethiopian Boyhood by Nega Mezlekia
Notes from the Hyena's Belly An Ethiopian Boyhood by Nega Mezlekia

"Part autobiography and part social history, Notes from the Hyena's Belly offers an unforgettable portrait of Ethiopia, and of Africa, during the 1970s and '80s, an era of civil war, widespread famine, and mass execution. "We children lived like the donkey," Mezlekia remembers, "careful not to wander off the beaten trail and end up in the hyena's belly." His memoir sheds light not only on the violence and disorder that beset his native country, but on the rich spiritual and cultural life of Ethiopia itself. Throughout, he portrays the careful divisions in dress, language, and culture between the Muslims and Christians of the Ethiopian landscape. Mezlekia also explores the struggle between western European interests and communist influences that caused the collapse of Ethiopia's social and political structure—and that forced him, at age 18, to join a guerrilla army. Through droughts, floods, imprisonment, and killing sprees at the hands of military juntas, Mezlekia survived, eventually emigrating to Canada. In Notes from the Hyena's Belly he bears witness to a time and place that few Westerners have understood."


message 3: by ConnorD (new)

ConnorD | 181 comments Nomination for Europe/Asia is The Autograph Man by Zadie Smith
The Autograph Man by Zadie Smith

"Alex-Li Tandem sells autographs. His business is to hunt for names on paper, collect them, sell them, and occasionally fake them�all to give the people what they want: a little piece of Fame. But what does Alex want? Only the return of his father, the end of religion, something for his headache, three different girls, infinite grace, and the rare autograph of forties movie actress Kitty Alexander. With fries."


message 4: by Beverly (new)

Beverly My nomination for East Africa is Waiting: A Novel of Uganda's Hidden War by Goretti Kyomuhendo

Set during the last year of the Ugandan dictator Idi Amin’s brutal regime, Waiting exposes the fear and courage of a small, close-knit community uncertain of what the edicts of a madman and the marauding of his uncontrollable army will bring with each coming day. As Amin’s war with Ugandan exiles and the Tanzanian army comes to an end, one family learns what it takes to survive and eventually to plan for a new life.

Goretti Kyomuhendo won the Uganda National Literary Award for Best Novel of the Year in 1999. She currently directs FEMRITE, a women’s publishing house in Uganda.

Waiting A Novel of Uganda's Hidden War by Goretti Kyomuhendo


message 5: by Beverly (new)

Beverly My nomination for Europe/Asia is Mr Loverman by Bernardine Evaristo

"In this vibrant novel, Evaristo draws wonderful character portraits of complex individuals as well as the West Indian immigrant culture in Britain."
--Booklist

“Bernardine Evaristo uncovers characters lost to history and myth and with compassion, an original and brilliant voice, and an unparalleled craft--all tinged with humor--she restores them and thus us.”
--Chris Abani, author of The Secret History of Las Vegas

Barrington Jedidiah Walker is seventy-four and leads a double life. Born and bred in Antigua, he's lived in Hackney, London, for years. A flamboyant character with a fondness for William Shakespeare, Barrington is a husband, father, grandfather—and also secretly gay. With an abundance of laugh-out-loud humor and wit, Mr. Loverman explodes cultural myths and shows the extent of what can happen when people fear the consequences of being true to themselves.

His deeply religious and disappointed wife, Carmel, thinks he sleeps with other women. When their marriage goes into meltdown, Barrington wants to divorce Carmel and live with Morris, but after a lifetime of fear and deception, will he manage to break away? With an abundance of laugh-out-loud humor and wit, Mr. Loverman explodes cultural myths and shows the extent of what can happen when people fear the consequences of being true to themselves.


message 6: by Ndiritu (new)

Ndiritu Wahome | 7 comments Hi everyone,

I would like to nominate my own book, The Sad Artist and Other Fairy Tales
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...
Thanks.


message 7: by ConnorD (last edited Jun 05, 2014 04:39AM) (new)

ConnorD | 181 comments Ndiritu wrote: "Hi everyone,

I would like to nominate my own book, The Sad Artist and Other Fairy Tales
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...
Thanks."


Hi Ndiritu, I have added your book to the list. Could you please write a short note on what the book is about (here on this East Africa thread. This will help members who vote on the polls regarding the content/nature of the book


message 8: by Ndiritu (new)

Ndiritu Wahome | 7 comments In Ndiritu Wahome’s first published book, he charms, tantalizes and engages his readers with a collection of fairytales for all ages. From a story-telling weaver bird to a chief’s son who finds the real value of life, Wahome leads his readers on a captivating journey that deifies time and reality yet remains relevant.

Wahome says his “objective was to create fantasy stories, which were infused with realism in the hope of letting young children know that even though life is full of hardships, they can overcome and achieve anything they so deemed.” But peel back another layer, and The Sad Artist and Other Fairytales has a strong message that reveals “bad leadership, appalling politics, sloth and corruption” that Wahome says is too often found in contemporary African governments.

“The Sad Artist is magical realism at its best. Wahome’s fairytales are in the tradition of Salmon Rushdie, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Ben Okri,” says publisher Catherine Rayburn-Trobaugh. “Ndiritu captures the innocence of the world through a child’s eyes to make strong statements about the modern condition.”

Although the fairytales are set in a mystical version Wahome’s native Kenya, they transcend Africa for a global perspective on the realities of life in the 21st century at the crossroads of old and new. Although Wahome’s fairytales can sometimes be cautionary, he never loses hope for both humanity and its future. His world is one that “The wicked, who seem to live the good life, in the end, suffer in their demise. The good, even though exposed to a life of poverty, wretchedness, and solitude, end up living happily ever after.”

More details of the book can be found here:http://www.wordbranch.com/the-sad-art...

Thanks.


message 9: by Donald (new)

Donald | 126 comments The polls for these two regions are now open - Please vote


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