Transgressive Fiction discussion

Crime and Punishment
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Crime and Punishment

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Jason (jasondenness) | 246 comments So I read this book as it was in the list of best transgressive books....

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1...

...It is a really good book, much much better than I was expecting BUT I don't see how it is considered transgressive.

Anybody here think it should be included? If so why?


message 2: by Steve (new)

Steve | 19 comments Mod
I started reading it a few years back and never finished but from what I remember it was mostly written from the perspective of the murderer, could that be why? Mind you as they are discussing in another thread, the genre isn't well defined, you can probably crowbar a tonne of things into the 'transgressive' category just by virtue of some character doing something weird or breaking rules.


Jason (jasondenness) | 246 comments Most of the book is from the murderers point of view but not much of it is about the murder.

The only thing I could think of was because he thought he had the right as an intellectual to do murder and get away with it... but that's just arrogance really, not transgressive.

Who knows, still was a good book and glad I read it.


message 4: by Guy (new)

Guy Portman (guyportman) | 156 comments Jason wrote: "Most of the book is from the murderers point of view but not much of it is about the murder.

The only thing I could think of was because he thought he had the right as an intellectual to do murder..."


I have never heard Crime and Punishment described as Transgressive Fiction before. Obviously Transgressive is a genre that is rather vague, but as I understand it Transgressive Fiction only really evolved in the middle of the 20th Century. It sounds like a good book Jason. Anna Karenina is going to be my introduction to Tolstoy, as I mentioned before. If I like it I might read Crime and Punishment.


Jason (jasondenness) | 246 comments The only reason I started off my adventure into Russian literature was because it was on the top 100 transgressive books in the above link.

It isn't a bad thing I read it as I am now moving onto War and peace. Trying to find a copy of the brothers Karamazov but my local library don't have it.


message 6: by V.M. (new)

V.M. Gautier | 15 comments I think, Jason, you'd first have to define exactly how you define "transgressive." For me at least, "transgressive" doesn't mean it celebrates transgresssion, but that it describes it, that characters live outside the norms. Crime and Punishment ultimately makes a case for spiritual redemption and reform -- the possibility of grace. In a sense many transgressive works do this, albeit in a less heavy-handed manner. Crime and Punishment does deal with characters who transgress -- Sonia forced by circumstances into prostitution, Raskolnikov is certainly transgressing society's rules by committing two senseless murders. But the point of view is that Sonia is noble and does this to keep her family from starving and Raskolnikov is temporarily insane.


Jason (jasondenness) | 246 comments Such a difficult genre to class, I think the problem I have is I keep comparing the books looking for similar transgressive features and that just isn't possible all the time.


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