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Crime and Punishment
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky Collection > Crime and Punishment Section 4 - Spoilers

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message 1: by Cindy (last edited May 04, 2014 07:54AM) (new)

Cindy Brown (beautygoodbook) Thank You Lisa for being our discussion leader for this book.


message 2: by MK (last edited Jun 02, 2014 12:25PM) (new) - added it

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Crime and Punishment was chosen from monthly nominations as our June 2014 Old School Classic Group Read. I hope you will join the conversation! Please take care to limit SPOILERS to appropriate threads, so so as to not to give away any plot points prematurely! :)

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message 3: by [deleted user] (last edited May 10, 2014 12:31PM) (new)

Section 4: Chapters 21-26 and Spoilers definitely allowed! :-)

Love is in the air and then it isn’t --

Part 4 Quotable:

“But, perhaps there is no God at all,” Raskolnikov answered with a sort of malignance, laughed and looked at her.

Questions to ponder:

1. Does Raskolnikov truly have feelings for Sonia and why is he drawn to her? What right does he have to judge her profession and her religious beliefs?

2. Luzhin reveals his true character through his plan to accuse Sonia of theft, but why does Semyonovitch (who has a bad reputation) come to Sonia’s defense?
Is Semyonovitch truly a decent person after all?

3. Do you think Porfiry has plans to arrest Raskolnikov before Nikolay (the painter) bursts into the room? Does Porfiry believe Nikolay’s confession?


Kelly B (kellybey) | 266 comments 1. Does Raskolnikov truly have feelings for Sonia and why is he drawn to her? What right does he have to judge her profession and her religious beliefs?

I don't think R is "in love" with Sonia per se; I think he's fascinated by her due to their common life circumstances. R can relate to Sonia since both their lives have turned out much differently than what they wanted or expected. R also sees that Sonia has taken the higher moral road, and sacrificed herself for her family. R is the opposite: in fact, he's taken advantage of his mother and sister (and others) repeatedly. Sonia lives her life for the good of others; R lives his life for himself.

I don't think R has the right to judge Sonia for anything, considering what a "scoundrel" he is himself. He does judge her though, and realizes that she's better than him from the standpoint of putting others before herself.


Kelly B (kellybey) | 266 comments 3. Do you think Porfiry has plans to arrest Raskolnikov before Nikolay (the painter) bursts into the room? Does Porfiry believe Nikolay’s confession?

I don't know of he necessarily had plans to arrest R, but I believe he wanted to shock R into a confession of sorts.

No, I don't think Porfiry believed the confession, P seemed to imply that someone convinced Nikolay to confess even though he didn't commit the murders.


message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

Kelly,

I agree that Porfiry highly suspects R but does not yet have enough solid evidence to arrest him, so he really does try to obtain a confession. It almost seems as though R and Porfiry are playing a game of cat and mouse, and R is very suspicious of everyone else too, often wondering if they know the truth.


Kelly B (kellybey) | 266 comments I agree that Porfiry highly suspects R but does not yet have enough solid evidence to arrest him, so he really does try to obtain a confession. It almost seems as though R and Porfiry are playing a game of cat and mouse, and R is very suspicious of everyone else too, often wondering if they know the truth.

I wonder if R realizes just how suspicious his actions are;-)? He certainly makes matters worse every time he talks to Porfiry.


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 1791 comments Somehow I think that RR thinks he is superior to Porfiry--that P is too stupid. I think that RRs initial conversation with P about "what he would do if he were the murderer" was a form of arrogance.

Although in the beginning I said that I thought RR was disturbed, but feel that he somehow feels he is " superior" to others.


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Great insights into R's behavior during his interactions with Porfiry.

Yes, Andrea, that sense of "superiority" does come through during the conversations between R and Porfiry; Catch me if you can --


Lesley | 46 comments I've fallen behind a little. Great thoughts above, and I agree that R has a sense of superiority.


message 11: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9117 comments Mod
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky is our 2019 2nd Quarter Long Read for the group. The group previously read the book in 2014.

This is one of seven Spoiler Threads

Reading schedule:

April 1 - 15: Part One

April 16 - 30: Part Two

May 1 - 15: Part Three

May 16- 31: Part Four

June 1 - 15: Part Five

June 16 - 30: Part Six & Epilogue

Book as a Whole

Film versions of the book.

Previous thread on translations


message 12: by Matt (new) - rated it 5 stars

Matt (mmullerm) | 678 comments Just finished part 4. I love the foreshadowing of the raising of Lazarus from the dead and how that mirrors Rodion’s struggles with Luzhin, Svidrigailov, and Porfiry Petrovich. When Raskolnikov is placed in three very unpleasant scenes and it seems like “the jig is up”, a miracle somehow falls into his lap, and he’s given “new life”.

My favorite character interaction in this part is when Rodion goes to see Porfiry. I absolutely love how Porfiry just totally seems to outwit him. Rodion (although he would probably way to cocky to actually admit it) is forced to realize that he may not be as clever as he thought himself to be.

Raskolnikov is certainly good at making enemies - it makes me wonder why Razhumikin is such a devoted friend to him. I suppose making a protagonist with no friends would have made Rodion too one-sided and not at all likable.


message 13: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9117 comments Mod
You are keeping on schedule nicely, Matt. You are down to the last third of the book.


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