The Readers Review: Literature from 1714 to 1910 discussion

101 views
2014 Group Reads - Archives > Summer 2014 Reading - American Authors

Comments Showing 1-50 of 53 (53 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Silver (new)

Silver American Authors just barely eked out ahead of Trollope, so over the course of the summer we will be focusing on reading books from various different American Authors.

Please offer up your suggestions here for any American Authors you would be most interested in reading during the summer.


message 2: by Elsbeth (new)

Elsbeth (elsbethgm) I have a few questions about this:
Do we just name one (or more?) authors, or do we also make a suggestion as to what book(s) we would like to read by them? And how many authors will we chose? How many books will we read - one for every author?

I would like to nominate:
Willa Cather Willa Cather
James Oliver Curwood James Oliver Curwood
(if it is possible to nominate more than one)


message 3: by Silver (new)

Silver You may suggest more than one, and if you want you can suggest a specific book or just name the author or authors you are interested in. I haven't decided yet if books will be chosen by polling or maybe random selection chosen from recommended authors.

I think that how many books per author we read will in part be determined by how many author suggestions we end up with.


message 4: by Elsbeth (new)

Elsbeth (elsbethgm) Silver wrote: "You may suggest more than one, and if you want you can suggest a specific book or just name the author or authors you are interested in. I haven't decided yet if books will be chosen by polling or ..."

Okay, thanks!


message 5: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments I also like Willa Cather.

Also Edith Wharton, Louisa May Alcott (her "Work" might be something different), Hawthorne, Poe (Dupin mysteries might be fun).

And I know that James Fenimore Cooper's books have been dissed a bit here :-) but I like them.

Lastly, Jack London's Call of the Wild might be different for the group as well.


message 6: by Xan (new)

Xan  Shadowflutter (shadowflutter) | 101 comments Jack London
L. Frank Baum


message 7: by Jenny (new)

Jenny | 56 comments Mark Twain


message 8: by Hedi (new)

Hedi | 960 comments I have wanted to read something by Henry David Thoreau for a while, e.g. Walden or Civil Disobedience and Other Essays


message 9: by Elsbeth (last edited May 06, 2014 01:57AM) (new)

Elsbeth (elsbethgm) I'd like to nominate: Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser. I don't know if it is a good book...


message 10: by Silver (new)

Silver Elsbeth wrote: "I'd like to nominate: Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser. I don't know if it is a good book..."

I really enjoyed it when I read it.


message 11: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2632 comments Elsbeth wrote: "I'd like to nominate: Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser. I don't know if it is a good book..."

Well worth reading -- but if I was to pick only one version, it would be the restored original, not the one first printed. Better yet, read both and contrast for an understanding about censorship pressures on an author. His An American Tragedy, however, may be the book considered his masterpiece, if my memory serves me correctly.

http://www.library.upenn.edu/collecti...

Here is an excellent, no, let me call it superb, web site at the University of Pennsylvania on Dreiser.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5... -- As far as I know, only Penguin Classics has printed the restored version. I had to search a bit to get a copy at the time I read it (I bought it within my driving area rather than ordering online).


message 12: by Lily (last edited May 06, 2014 10:01AM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2632 comments The works of several of these authors extend well into the 1900's, i.e., well beyond 1910. I don't believe Willa Cather has any novels published prior to 1910. Several of Edith Wharton's works are beyond that date. I haven't checked others, but depending on the guidelines established for the summer read, such may be a consideration both for nominations and for voting.

P.S. Even Dreiser's An American Tragedy is 1925.

Charlotte Perkins Gilman is solidly within our time period.


message 13: by Elsbeth (new)

Elsbeth (elsbethgm) Lily wrote: "The works of several of these authors extend well into the 1900's, i.e., well beyond 1910. I don't believe Willa Cather has any novels published prior to 1910. Several of Edith Wharton's works ar..."

Okay, I didn't really think about what time the books were published - good of you to remind me of that! Well, we already have so many nominations, it would make the choice only easier when a few of them wouldn't qualify ;)


message 14: by Elsbeth (new)

Elsbeth (elsbethgm) I just checked: most of Willa Cather's novels were published in the 1920's - so we can't chose her. Sister Carrie was published in 1900.


message 15: by Elsbeth (new)

Elsbeth (elsbethgm) James Oliver Curwood's books are also from a decade later...
Just forget I nominated them... :)


message 16: by Elsbeth (new)

Elsbeth (elsbethgm) I would love to read The Yellow Wallpaper!


message 17: by Linda (new)

Linda | 228 comments Elsbeth wrote: "I would love to read The Yellow Wallpaper!"

That looks really interesting!


message 18: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 269 comments The Yellow Wallpaper is a fascinating story!


message 19: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4467 comments Mod
Lily wrote: "The works of several of these authors extend well into the 1900's, i.e., well beyond 1910. I don't believe Willa Cather has any novels published prior to 1910. Several of Edith Wharton's works ar..."

One of my fav authors.


message 20: by Hippystick (new)

Hippystick | 17 comments I'd love The Yellow Wallpaper too, it's been hanging around my bookcase for far too long. Also there's what's described as Louisa May Alcott's "sensation novel" Behind A Mask which I fancy too.


message 21: by Elsbeth (new)

Elsbeth (elsbethgm) Hippystick wrote: "I'd love The Yellow Wallpaper too, it's been hanging around my bookcase for far too long. Also there's what's described as Louisa May Alcott's "sensation novel" Behind A Mask which I fancy too."

Do you mean: Behind a Mask, Or, a Woman's Power? I'd like that, too!


message 22: by Hippystick (new)

Hippystick | 17 comments Elsbeth wrote: "Hippystick wrote: "I'd love The Yellow Wallpaper too, it's been hanging around my bookcase for far too long. Also there's what's described as Louisa May Alcott's "sensation novel" Behind A Mask wh..."

Yes I do. I've never read her before, never really fancied Little Women etc but I do like the look of this one. I loved Lady Audley's Secret and I'd like to investigate Victoria scandal novels more.


message 23: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2632 comments Personally, I don't much care for The Yellow Wallpaper, but it is one of those books that ought to be read. If anyone knows more of Charlotte Perkins Gilman oeuvre and what to suggest, I should think it could be very interesting to read at least two of her works.

In her recent and popular The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk Kidd draws our attention to Sarah Grimké, one of ~1,000 women honored in Judy Chicago’s Dinner Party, a 1970's feminist art installation now at the Brooklyn Museum. I don't know how easy it is to obtain nor how readable her writings are, but Kidd and Wikipedia alerted me that Grimké was the most broadly published abolitionist author prior to Harriet Beecher Stowe.


message 24: by Lily (last edited May 08, 2014 08:11AM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2632 comments This doesn't touch on that fertile period in American literature from 1900 to 1910, but is from a syllabus of "American Literature before 1900" at California State University, East Bay:

https://www20.csueastbay.edu/class/de...

This may also be of interest in thinking about American literature as a whole:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American...


message 25: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 269 comments The Invention of Wings was an amazing novel. I loved it! It would be interesting to read Sarah Grimke's work!


message 26: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4467 comments Mod
Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman would be a nice companion piece. Her short stories are excellent as well.


message 27: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey | 41 comments No, I believe Dinner Party was in the early 80´s. I met two of its participants in the late 80´s and they had just gotten married having worked with Judy on the Project.


message 28: by Lily (last edited May 08, 2014 05:20PM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2632 comments Geoffrey wrote: "No, I believe Dinner Party was in the early 80´s. I met two of its participants in the late 80´s and they had just gotten married having worked with Judy on the Project."

Geoffrey -- according to the Brooklyn Museum, the date is 1974-79. I think it was on tour for sometime? And it was probably in the '80's before it was installed at Brooklyn? Possibly with original participants working on the installation? Don't know that part of its history in detail and am not up to ferreting it out right now.

http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibit...

http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/... -- a good link for some exploring


message 29: by Lily (last edited May 15, 2014 07:59AM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2632 comments Looks to me as if the installation at Brooklyn Museum wasn't until after the turn of the century, and that was when Kidd was inspired. I suspect there are some fun stories among those who worked on the project -- originally, on tour, during the installation, even on-going.


message 30: by Geoffrey (last edited May 17, 2014 09:54AM) (new)

Geoffrey | 41 comments On the website it says the first critical reports on the DINNER PARTY didn´t come about until 1980, so I will assume that was when it was first shown


message 31: by Lily (last edited May 19, 2014 10:51AM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2632 comments Geoffrey wrote: "On the website it says the first critical reports on the DINNER PARTY didn´t come about until 1980, so I will assume that was when it was first shown"

Sounds about right. This fun article, by Mia Fineman for Slate who says she saw its installation in Brooklyn in 1980 (when she was fourteen) and wrote this article after seeing its return in 2007, indicates the first installation was in San Diego.

http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/ar...

This piece says there was an early showing at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art:

http://books.google.com/books?id=4v0D...


message 32: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey | 41 comments Please Lilly
In the future when you enter a link for a magazine article don´t include the entire magazine. I would have liked to have read the article but I am not going to wade through an entire magazine to find it.


message 33: by Lily (last edited May 20, 2014 04:40AM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2632 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Please Lilly
In the future when you enter a link for a magazine article don´t include the entire magazine. I would have liked to have read the article but I am not going to wade through an entire m..."


Sorry -- that's the way it came to me. Like most magazines, the article should be easy to find. When I get a chance, I may recheck if there is a better link -- if I remember. [g] Or, you might try google -- mag name, date, Judy Chicago would probably do it.


message 34: by Silver (new)

Silver Based upon all of your suggestions posted here, I have randomly selected our first American Author which we will begin reading on June 21st.

We will be starting with Jack London. Being that he has such a large body of work I have randomly selected five of his books which have been placed in a poll where you can now go vote for which book you would most like to read.

Because many of his Jack London's books are relatively short I may choose more than one of his works to be read in our first month of our Summer Reading project.

You will have until the end of this month to vote.


message 35: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey | 41 comments Sounds good. I may have read a short story of his years ago, but I am not familiar with any of the tales. Just the name.


message 36: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2632 comments Jack London is a character, along with Upton Sinclair, in Joyce Carol Oates' book The Accursed. (Don't consider that a recommendation to read, but it is a fun aspect of the book.)


message 37: by Silver (new)

Silver Lily wrote: "Jack London is a character, along with Upton Sinclair, in Joyce Carol Oates' book The Accursed. (Don't consider that a recommendation to read, but it is a fun aspect o..."

When I was in middle school I think it was I did a report on a biography of Jack London, I always enjoyed his books, loved Call of the Wild and White Fang. He did lead quite the interesting life and I found him to be rather fascinating.

I am quite looking forward to reading more of his work.


message 38: by Linda2 (last edited May 21, 2014 10:06AM) (new)

Linda2 | 3742 comments Lily wrote: "The works of several of these authors extend well into the 1900's, i.e., well beyond 1910. I don't believe Willa Cather has any novels published prior to 1910. ..."

I'm late to the party.

Cather had many magazine stories published in that period, unless we want to stick strictly to novels.


message 39: by Silver (new)

Silver Short Stories can be included.


message 40: by Ronald (new)

Ronald Roumanis The Octopus, by Frank Norris is very American and came out in 1901. Early Dreiser is long but good.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Edith Wharton completely falls within this group's time-frame too; and one could easily spend a lifetime--and I am--studying, reading, and re-reading her novels, novellas, and short stories. IMHO, Edith Wharton is one of America's literary giants!


message 42: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3742 comments Another vote here for her short stories written for magazines. We could cherry-pick the ones up to 1910.

http://readbookonline.net/stories/Wha...

I sometimes wonder why this group stopped at 1910 instead of 1914, when the war began.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Rochelle wrote: "Another vote here for her short stories written for magazines. We could cherry-pick the ones up to 1910.

http://readbookonline.net/stories/Wha...

I sometimes wonder why this group stopped at..."


Or, why didn't we go to 1930, or something...


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Rochelle wrote: "Another vote here for her short stories written for magazines. We could cherry-pick the ones up to 1910.

http://readbookonline.net/stories/Wha...

I sometimes wonder why this group stopped at..."


I have all of her short stories--all of them, mind you--in various collections, but my favorite collection is the two-volume Library of America hardback set. They are wonderful to dive into, and all of her short stories are presented in chronological order. I highly recommend these editions!


message 45: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4467 comments Mod
I've always enjoyed her. It would be nice to include her in the American authors.


message 46: by Linda2 (last edited Aug 15, 2014 12:33PM) (new)

Linda2 | 3742 comments Christopher wrote: "Or, why didn't we go to 1930, or something... "

No, nothing arbitrary, but I don't think 1910 is a dividing line of anything the way 1914 is. Just a thought.

I'll have to rely on the online texts, and I'm grateful for them.


message 47: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4467 comments Mod
So maybe we should consider modifying the time line?


message 48: by Silver (new)

Silver Christopher wrote: "Or, why didn't we go to 1930, or something... .."

We could extend the timeline


message 49: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments Are we starting House of the Seven Gables tomorrow? I haven't seen any threads for the book, and wanted to make sure before I purchased the book.

Thanks.


message 50: by Silver (new)

Silver Lynnm wrote: "Are we starting House of the Seven Gables tomorrow? I haven't seen any threads for the book, and wanted to make sure before I purchased the book.

Thanks."


Sorry about that, having been away on vacation things have been a bit hectic here getting caught up on stuff and readjusting. I haven't been able to put together a proper reading schedule but we will be starting House of Seven Gables as planned and I will have the threads for the discussion posted soon.


« previous 1
back to top