Vaginal Fantasy Book Club discussion

Shades of Milk and Honey (Glamourist Histories, #1)
This topic is about Shades of Milk and Honey
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Apr 2016: The Magpie Lord > Shades of M&H - no spoilers

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message 1: by Kris (new) - rated it 1 star

Kris | 45 comments Okay so I am in about 30% of a book and it is kinda boring and painful to read. Is it going to improve? And why does Melody say LA! all the time?!


Sanasai | 326 comments I can see where it would feel really sluggish if you weren't expecting the older British comedy of manners style. It's a very Austen-inspired book, so it won't have the pace that urban fantasy rolls along. The back picks up a little, but it doesn't change style-wise. I think the La! is just a habit of speaking that they have, much like modern slang will go through periods where a word (or non-word) will just be everywhere for a while. If it's bugging you, try fitting in whatever the kids are saying dismissively in your area these days when you see it, so that it's "meh." or whatever it is now.

Also, this book has the fault of being too much setup for the series, and not enough story line for this book. Later ones get better about that, but the overall style doesn't change, it's always Austen-with-magic. I still enjoyed it, moderately, but it won't be for everyone.


Heather | 175 comments Raketka29 wrote: " And why does Melody say LA! all the time?!"
I forgot about that. That was pretty annoying.


message 4: by Kris (new) - rated it 1 star

Kris | 45 comments Sanasai wrote: "I can see where it would feel really sluggish if you weren't expecting the older British comedy of manners style."
I like Austen ... and to be honest, just the movies. To me this book is boring and nothing is going on, I continue reading though. I just skip describing part. And the "La!" I know what does it mean but first, it is annoying, second I think I might be way too old to change it for something "kids" say these days and if so, it won't be "nice" word and absolutely out of the style :D
I am around half now and finally something happens but guess I am not type of reader for long inner monologues about nothing.

Heather wrote: "Raketka29 wrote: " And why does Melody say LA! all the time?!"
I forgot about that. That was pretty annoying."

RIGHT?!


Heather Christian | 3 comments I actually loved this book! But I'm a huge Austen fan. I also listened to the audiobook, which was wonderfully done. The whole concept of glamour being a "womanly art" along the lines of needlepoint or playing the piano forte was brilliant, but then it was confusing to me that all of the master practitioners and tutors of the craft were men. I doubt there were male needlepoint tutors, so that seemed a bit off. Either it's a womanly art, or it's just art. But mostly I just enjoyed the idea of a world where you could pull folds of magic out of the ether and weave them into whatever came to mind. How I'd love to weave a little fairy light whenever I needed it. Sigh. I will definitely be checking out the rest of the series!


message 6: by Kris (new) - rated it 1 star

Kris | 45 comments I think major problem for me is that I am not native English speaker so all the eather and fold thing is for me hard to imagine or read. I will try my best to read it though but guess I am not going for Austen's book in future :D


Jen (NerdifiedJen) (NerdifiedJen) | 53 comments Heather wrote: "The whole concept of glamour being a "womanly art" along the lines of needlepoint or playing the piano forte was brilliant, but then it was confusing to me that all of the master practitioners and tutors of the craft were men. I doubt there were male needlepoint tutors, so that seemed a bit off. Either it's a womanly art, or it's just art."

I haven't actually read this book yet, but your comment made me think. When you say "it's either a womanly art or it's just art," this definitely strikes a cord. I know that the book is possibly set in the Regency Era (correct me if I'm wrong on that - but I know it is being compared to Austen), so I can see why the art was set up this way.

There is a mode of thinking, stemming mostly from Victorian roots, that when activities that originate in the domestic realm (aka the women's realm) transcend to being professions, they become part of the public realm, and therefore the privilege of men. We still see this in the present and/or recent past: cooking for the household is a traditional woman's duty, but professional chefs are primarily men. In the realm of art, a woman may paint for leisure or to become an "accomplished woman", but most famous artists throughout history have been men. We even see it in our representations of the ancient past: A woman may gather plants for the household (while the man is out hunting), but as soon as "farming" becomes a purposeful and lucrative "profession", it is assumed that the men take over. I am, of course, speaking in generalizations, and we have made a lot of progress in each of these arenas, but you can see my point.

I would love to see more fictitious storylines that break out of this mold, but I think it was probably constrained by the time period setting. Possibly having magic was anachronistic enough?

Thanks for bringing that up and making me think! I will keep that in mind while I read.


Alicia Jen (NerdifiedJen) wrote: "There is a mode of thinking, stemming mostly from Victorian roots, that when activities that originate in the domestic realm (aka the women's realm) transcend to being professions, they become part of the public realm, and therefore the privilege of men. ..."

It's definitely in that mould, yes. Of the "women make pretty cupcakes, men become Master Bakers" side of things.


message 9: by KaLee (new)

KaLee Douglas | 50 comments Is this only in ebook form?


message 10: by KaLee (new)

KaLee Douglas | 50 comments Nevermind for some reason it just was giving me a 404 for no reason.


Melani Raketka29 wrote: "I think major problem for me is that I am not native English speaker so all the eather and fold thing is for me hard to imagine or read. I will try my best to read it though but guess I am not goin..."

Do not judge Austin by this novel. Please. This is a copy, and a mediocre copy at that. It's like judging Rembrandt from a student piece. I'm not sure how much difficulty you'd have with Austin considering you're not a native English speaker, though I don't think much.


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