SLCLS Genre Study discussion

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Sci Fi Subgenres > Near Future/ Mundane

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message 1: by Stephanie (last edited May 01, 2014 01:47PM) (new)

Stephanie | 37 comments Near future (sometimes called mundane) stories are set in the present day or within the next few years, and the technology is limited to a believable use of science as it is currently available. As a sub-genre of Science Fiction it hasn't been around long, only since 2002 or so (although books published before this can fall into it), and is a bit controversial. Some books considered as part of this category are The Death of Grass by John Christopher, and Blood Music by Greg Bear. What do you think? Should this category be considered Science Fiction? Have you read any?


message 2: by Tina (new)

Tina B (readinghonor) | 22 comments I just read Chimera: A Jim Chapel Mission. Set in the near future, this book is about an army war veteran who's been given a 'James Bond' type assignment. He has a robotic arm that works well enough to use in combat situations (but has to be plugged in to recharge every 48 hrs) and he's hunting down a group of terrorists who have genetically created/modified using animal DNA.

I think this is a thriller, not science fiction, because it's plausible enough to happen within the next 5 to 10 years.


message 3: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie | 37 comments I think that's why it's a little controversial as a genre- at this point the technology is fictional, but is probably pretty close to becoming a reality. So where does it cross the line? Is there even a line?


message 4: by Chrissy (new)

Chrissy (ladynovella) | 4 comments I know it's not a novel, but it's popular enough that some imitators could crop up - the TV show Person of Interest is all present-day, but with science fictional elements like a machine that spontaneously communicates with its handlers and even has its own free will, even though its creators never actually programmed it to do that. I'm just wondering if there are any novels like that out there yet.


message 5: by Cara (new)

Cara | 49 comments So would you include medical thrillers in this genre? some of them deal with diseases or medical discoveries that are not yet in existence but could be soon so would they be considered science fiction? I think this is a very problematic sub genre but it is obviously very popular. After all it is basically what a lot of comic books have been doing for years. (e.g. Avengers deals largely with people augmented through genetic modification, advanced robotics, or extreme training. The exception being Thor who is an Alien)


message 6: by Cherie (new)

Cherie Chrissy wrote: "I know it's not a novel, but it's popular enough that some imitators could crop up - the TV show Person of Interest is all present-day, but with science fictional elements like a machine that spont..."
I think this fits into spy-fi category.


message 7: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie | 37 comments Cara wrote: "So would you include medical thrillers in this genre? some of them deal with diseases or medical discoveries that are not yet in existence but could be soon so would they be considered science fict..."

I would think that medical thrillers like the ones you describe can fit into this sub-genre. After all, Science Fiction is about the imagined (or extrapolated) effects of science on society, and that sounds like what you've described to me.


message 8: by Jewel (new)

Jewel The Kraken Project, Douglas Preston, fits in this genre. One of the characters is the AI itself--which creates the Science Fiction. The time frame is current.


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