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May: Return of the Cold War > What does Cold War in fiction or non-fiction mean to you?

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message 1: by RWL (new)

RWL Waterloo Library (regionofwaterloolibrary) | 162 comments Mod
What ideas, tropes, settings, or characters come to mind when you think of the Cold War?


message 2: by Becca (new)

Becca | 5 comments The first thing I always think of is spies. James Bond or Jack Ryan. These archetypal characters that fit with in very specific molds. Usually they are brilliant, fearless, amoral, defined by intense national loyalty, or loyalty to none.

Also, this idea of a cat and mouse game. Each side is so cunning and equally matched that the choice is either a stalemate or all out destruction. There really isn't any middle ground. I guess that is what the idea of mutual assured destruction was based upon.


message 3: by Heather (new)

Heather Pearson (heatherpearson) | 53 comments I can't say i have ever thought about this genre. My dad used to read all sorts of Russia vs USA type books. I would pick up the occasional one that was lying about the house, but I didn't seek them out on my own.


message 4: by RWL (new)

RWL Waterloo Library (regionofwaterloolibrary) | 162 comments Mod
Do you remember the titles of any of the books you picked up?


message 5: by Heather (new)

Heather Pearson (heatherpearson) | 53 comments Can's say I do, though there was probably some Tom Clancy


message 6: by YZ (new)

YZ | 21 comments I have no interest or inclination to read about this. The politics are just too depressing. And blacklisting an all that horrid stuff holds no appeal. My parents were immigrants who survived WWII and maybe that explains why I know all about it and don't want to know more.


message 7: by Heather (new)

Heather Pearson (heatherpearson) | 53 comments YZ wrote: "I have no interest or inclination to read about this. The politics are just too depressing. And blacklisting an all that horrid stuff holds no appeal. My parents were immigrants who survived WWII a..."

Now that you mention the black listing, it does bring another, very different book to mind that I read in December. The Apothecary by Maile Meloy. A family involved in acting moved from the USA to England to avoid scrutiny and their young daughter is forced to move with them. In England she gets mixed up with others who are using 'magic' to help defeat the Russians. I have a full review on my blog. http://www.heatherpearson.com/2014/01...


message 8: by Leanne (last edited May 15, 2014 07:37PM) (new)

Leanne Clark (bookwormcook) | 47 comments Mod
Yvonne, your feelings are totally understandable and I appreciate your honesty! It's hard to find a topic that will appeal to everyone. I bet you have lots of good ideas for what we could read in the future. Please feel free to share them. :)

By the way, you are right: Watchmen is darker than what I typically read! It starts out with a mysterious murder, introducing some interesting characters (superheroes?). I get the impression the world is in need of saving, but I'm not sure why yet! Or by whom...

I read your review, Heather. Thanks for sharing that! Now this book sounds like it's really up my alley (magic + child protagonists + English setting). I'll have to check that one out for sure. I see that RWL has it as well as the sequel!
http://olco.canlib.ca/client/rwl/sear....


message 9: by Heather (new)

Heather Pearson (heatherpearson) | 53 comments thanks for the reminders about the sequel Leanne. i have now placed a request for it.


message 10: by YZ (new)

YZ | 21 comments I've just now (5 minutes ago) finished our book club's book for this month. It is "Rules of Civility" by Amor Towles. It's a first novel, set in NYC at the end of the 30's.

This has grabbed me more than anything I have read for some time. I love some of the plot twists, the descriptions of famous buildings and night spots. The layers of society and how they mesh together.

I am so glad I've come out of my dry spell and found a book that has taken me away! A winner, for sure. (and I am not necessarily a fan of "historical fiction")


message 11: by Leanne (new)

Leanne Clark (bookwormcook) | 47 comments Mod
It sounds like you're not the only one who enjoyed Rules of Civility, judging by the many glowing reviews!

If anyone else is interested, you can find it on downloadLibrary as an e-book and as an e-audiobook:
http://www.downloadlibrary.ca/5E01585...

It's also available as a "real" book on our shelves!
http://olco.canlib.ca/client/rwl/sear...

I feel like I've been in a reading dry spell of my own recently, so maybe I should try this one too! Did you like the literary allusions, Yvonne? One thing reviewers keep saying is that the characters in the book are frequently quoting famous authors. Being such a well-read individual, you probably noticed this!


message 12: by YZ (new)

YZ | 21 comments Thanks for reminding me of one of the reasons I loved this book. There were piles of books in many of the main locations (in a literal sense; the main character moves a stack of "literary" reads and replaces them with potboilers.) "Walden Pond" by Thoreau has a special meaning in the story.

I really did love this book...


message 13: by Leanne (new)

Leanne Clark (bookwormcook) | 47 comments Mod
I actually listened to the first two chapters last night while I cleaned. (Got the e-audiobook from downloadLibrary.) I'm hooked already! lol


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