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Words you Hate/Love

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message 1: by Janessa (new)

Janessa (labyrinth001) Whenever I listen to an author interview, there's one question I especially enjoy: If you could ban one word, what would it be? I like to hear the reasons behind what each author chooses. I thought it would be fun to see what other people had to say on the subject.

For myself, I would ban the word "amazing." I think it is a boring adjective that has much more interesting alternatives. I think people overuse it because it so quickly comes to mind, but there are so many synonyms that can replace it.

As for a word I love, I have always enjoyed saying the word "kibitzing." As in chatting with a friend. When I was young my mom would always say I spent too much time kibitzing on the phone with my friends, and it was such a fun word to me. Just say it: Kibitzing!

Anyone else have words they hate/love?


message 2: by John (Nevets) (new)

John (Nevets) Nevets (nevets) | 1531 comments Not necessarily a word but an abbreviated phrase that gives me the wrong feeling is RIP. I very much appreciate the sentiment of "rest in peace", but the abbreviation has never sat right with me. It always makes me think of "ripping" on someone, even though I know that is not the intention. I also think it has something to do with my first interaction with RIP was on Halloween tombstones when I was very young, more scarey then respectful.

And I guess a fun word I always like the sound of is "Jezynowka". I'm not Polish, but grew up in a small community with a lot of people who were of Polish heritage. It apparently means something like "of blackberry" Most often used referring to blackberry brandy. Good stuff.


message 3: by Shaline (new)

Shaline Lopez | 42 comments I would ban "biweekly" because it's almost always used incorrectly. Biweekly means twice a week, and it drives me nuts when people say biweekly but mean bimonthly.

As for words I like, I've always thought the word "underpants" was inherently hilarious. Definitely one of my favorite words.


message 4: by Tassie Dave, S&L Historian (new)

Tassie Dave | 3495 comments Mod
Shaline wrote: "I would ban "biweekly" because it's almost always used incorrectly. Biweekly means twice a week, and it drives me nuts when people say biweekly but mean bimonthly."

I can understand your frustration but, due to the complexity of our language, it can legitimately be used for both meanings.

The word I would ban is "gaol" instead of "jail". I know it is the correct spelling for me as an Australian but it just looks wrong.


message 5: by David Sven (new)

David Sven (gorro) | 1582 comments Tassie Dave wrote: "The word I would ban is "gaol" instead of "jail". I know it is the correct spelling for me as an Australian but it just looks wrong. "

Yeah - "gaol" looks like it's better suited to the AFL football field. AFL players can't spell anyway.


message 6: by Pat (new)

Pat (patthebadger) | 100 comments I'd ban the use of 'super' as an adverb. I'm not sure why but every time i hear it or read it it really annoys me.

Also, the mispronounciation of mischievous with the extra syllable... gah!


message 7: by Isaiah (new)

Isaiah | 74 comments I think I would second banning amazing. It is overused (by myself sometimes) and there are many other words that convey the same thing. A word I like and never hear is mondegreen, a misinterpretation of a word or phrase one hears. Also defenestrate, to throw a person/thing out a window.


message 8: by AndrewP (new)

AndrewP (andrewca) | 2452 comments Shaline wrote: "I would ban "biweekly" because it's almost always used incorrectly. Biweekly means twice a week, and it drives me nuts when people say biweekly but mean bimonthly. "

What they really mean is once a fortnight :)


message 9: by Richard (new)

Richard I would ban people who misuse the word 'kibitzing'.

It is a Yiddish word, and is far more specific (and different) than the OP thinks it is.


message 10: by Janessa (new)

Janessa (labyrinth001) I think I am in love with the word defenestrate now...

Also, I am aware of the definition to which you are very kindly referring. But kibitzing has multiple definitions in this day and age and the one I have stated is perfectly acceptable ;-) Many words gain new meanings over time and it's okay to make use of them. But thank you for your input.


message 11: by Kristina (new)

Kristina | 588 comments I hate the word "trope" - i don't know why.

Love the word "implement" - i like how it feels :P it starts slow and ends fast.


message 12: by terpkristin (new)

terpkristin | 4120 comments Irregardless. I hate it because it's not a word. It needs to go away.

I love the word ubiquitous. But I used it once in a job interview and the interviewer didn't know what it meant, he had to stop me and ask me. At that point, I knew I didn't get the job. Oddly, it was an interview at the same company I currently work for, just in a different group...


message 13: by John (Nevets) (new)

John (Nevets) Nevets (nevets) | 1531 comments The made up word I use more then I should is imbetween. The funny thing is, I usually use it where between would work. Probably drives some people nuts. I also have no clue where I picked it up, but it feels like I've used it my whole life.


message 14: by Darren (new)

Darren I hate acronyms. I hate most that I use them, despite my dislike. Such a hypocrite. I like the word lugubrious, and wish it had a different meaning, so I could use it.


message 15: by Isaiah (new)

Isaiah | 74 comments terpkristin wrote: "Irregardless. I hate it because it's not a word. It needs to go away.

I love the word ubiquitous. But I used it once in a job interview and the interviewer didn't know what it meant, he had to sto..."

I actually used the word ubiquitous in a meeting at work recently, and my boss paused, told me that word was awesome and wrote it down so he could work it into his vocabulary. I was pretty happy with that.


message 16: by Eric (new)

Eric Mesa (djotaku) | 617 comments I think I'd ban awesome, at least until it got its original meaning back.

http://youtu.be/0rYT0YvQ3hs

and in case that disappears, the same thing at a different link:

http://youtu.be/SarfTyngMCE


message 17: by Dara (new)

Dara (cmdrdara) | 2693 comments I hate when people smash two words together to make one. It's mostly done with celebrity couples and marketing crap but I hate it. The new one that drives me nuts is the Sprint "framily".

I'm not crazy about "amazing" and try to use synonyms as much as possible.

I like "egregious". Not sure why. It's fun to say.


message 18: by Michele (new)

Michele | 1154 comments I hate "the feels," as in "That Hallmark card commercial made feel all the feels." Pick an emotion already.

I have, since I was a little girl, loved supercalifragilisticexpialidocious.


message 19: by Ty (new)

Ty Wilson (ShatterStar66) | 165 comments Michele wrote: "I hate "the feels," as in "That Hallmark card commercial made feel all the feels." Pick an emotion already.

I have, since I was a little girl, loved supercalifragilisticexpialidocious."


Even though the sound of it is something quite atrocious?


message 20: by Phil (new)

Phil | 1136 comments I hate all the business speak that was popular in the '90's. You don't "grow" a business, you build it damn it!
I also don't like that my kids say "pwned".

I do like gruntled, the opposite of disgruntled.
I also like awry since I learned I was pronouncing it incorrectly from an episode of That Girl over 40 years ago then found out 30 years ago that the same thing happened to my friend when he was a kid too.


message 21: by Joanna Chaplin (new)

Joanna Chaplin | 1175 comments I want to get rid of the phrase "just saying". People use it to try and mitigate offense. But if you weren't "just saying", you wouldn't have said it! Either take responsibility for your words or don't say them.

I have a number of favorites. Mostly ones with very precise meanings. Orthogonally. Predecease.

And one that's very vague. Season - a period of time of undefined length defined by a characteristic. So a season of sorrow or a season of births or a season of luck. But its length can only be defined after the fact.


message 22: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Griffin | 49 comments Eric wrote: "I think I'd ban awesome, at least until it got its original meaning back.

Eric - you are my soulmate! I refuse to utter that word! It is so overused. Not everything is awesome, unless you're watching The Lego Movie...


message 23: by Gary (new)

Gary People who, straight-faced, say ell-oh-ell or lawl when you make a joke.


message 24: by Ken (new)

Ken (kanthr) | 334 comments I dislike authors who use the "SAT words" to make them sound smarter.


message 25: by Joanna Chaplin (new)

Joanna Chaplin | 1175 comments Gary wrote: "People who, straight-faced, say ell-oh-ell or lawl when you make a joke."

I confess to using "BRB bathroom" in real life when leaving a board game for a brief break. It started as a joke and then became a habit.


message 26: by Ben (new)

Ben (bennewton_1) | 253 comments Dara wrote: "I hate when people smash two words together to make one. It's mostly done with celebrity couples and marketing crap but I hate it."

YES.


message 27: by Gary (new)

Gary Joanna wrote: "I confess to using "BRB bathroom" in real life when leaving a board game for a brief break. It started as a joke and then became a habit."

I don't think that's the worst thing in the world. The LOL thing bugs me because it seems like a lot of folks have lost their sense of irony on that one. SAYING laugh out loud instead of actually laughing out loud.... It's a little freaky.


message 28: by Eric (new)

Eric Mesa (djotaku) | 617 comments Stephanie wrote: "Eric wrote: "I think I'd ban awesome, at least until it got its original meaning back.

Eric - you are my soulmate! I refuse to utter that word! It is so overused. Not everything is awesome, unles..."


More than just based on that word, it appears. 83% similarity in book tastes, according to Goodreads


message 29: by Casey (last edited May 05, 2014 09:43AM) (new)

Casey | 654 comments Oh, too many to choose from.


Dislike:
* exactly
* absolutely
* whatever
* actually

Like:
* interstice
* paragon
* nadir

Edited to add:
Loathe:
* whatever
* as well


message 30: by Ken (new)

Ken (kanthr) | 334 comments I f'ng hate the phrase "it is what it is".


message 31: by Richard (new)

Richard Janessa wrote: "I think I am in love with the word defenestrate now...

Also, I am aware of the definition to which you are very kindly referring. But kibitzing has multiple definitions in this day and age and the..."


No, it does not for educated people who are confounded by the destruction and cheapening of language by those of your ilk.

I cannot turn up the bastardized definition you claim exists "in this day and age".

Words do not mean whatever you wish them to mean, dear Tweedledum.


message 32: by Michele (new)

Michele | 1154 comments Words mean whatever a group of people decide they represent. A word is just a grunt with an agreed upon meaning.

Language changes constantly, otherwise we'd all still be using the 1st language noises of whatever homo sapien first made the noises that meant "WTF? Cave Lion! Run!"


message 33: by Richard (new)

Richard The issue is that when one 'group' decides another group's meaning is wrong, you get things anti-semitiscm.

The Nazis were very good at changing the meaning of Yiddish words and phrases to suit themselves.


message 34: by Ty (new)

Ty Wilson (ShatterStar66) | 165 comments I think the three most useful words I can think of right now are: discourteous, ungracious and insulting.


message 35: by Richard (new)

Richard Yiddish is the language of Jews. It is centuries old and words like kibitzing (which means "offering unwelcome advice") have specific meanings for those who speak Yiddish. When others come along and decided this meaning is no longer useful, are they not desecrating this heritage?


message 36: by Ken (new)

Ken (kanthr) | 334 comments There's an increase in ignorance of etymology in this era, Richard. People simply don't know, or don't care, or both. Personally I find language history interesting and enjoy when words are used in their original formats.


message 37: by Dharmakirti (last edited May 05, 2014 11:43AM) (new)

Dharmakirti | 942 comments Isaiah wrote: "Also defenestrate, to throw a person/thing out a window."

Defenestrate is one of my favorite words and I first encountered it in one of David & Leigh Eddings' novels.

So, suck it teachers who told me I wouldn't learn anything by reading fantasy. :)


message 38: by Dharmakirti (last edited May 05, 2014 11:43AM) (new)

Dharmakirti | 942 comments Michele wrote: "Words mean whatever a group of people decide they represent. A word is just a grunt with an agreed upon meaning.

Language changes constantly, otherwise we'd all still be using the 1st language no..."


+1

For those with an interest in philosopical speculation on cognition and language, you might like R. Scott Bakker's recent posts on his blog Three Pound Brain. The first is called "Davidson’s Fork: An Eliminativist Radicalization of Radical Interpretation" and the second is "The Blind Mechanic"

In "Davidson's Fork," the author offers
an eliminativist radicalization of [Donald Davidson's] Radical Interpretation, one that characterize[s] the scene of interpreting another speaker from scratch in mechanical terms...in terms of two stochastic machines attempting to find some mutual, causally systematic accord between the causally systematic accords each maintains with their environment.


"The Blind Mechanic" is a followup to the first post and is a preliminary attempt to "...suss out the mechanical relations pertinent to reason and interpretation." In this post, the author asks and answers the following question:
What do evolved, biomechanical systems such as humans need to coordinate astronomically complex covariational regimes with little more than sound? For one, they need ways to trigger selective activations of the other’s regime for effective behavioural uptake. Triggering requires some kind of dedicated cognitive sensitivity to certain kinds of sounds—those produced by complex vocalizations, in our case. As with any environmental sensitivity, iteration is the cornerstone, here. The complexity of the coordination possible will of course depend on the complexity of the activations triggered. To the extent that evolution rewards complex behavioural coordination, we can expect evolution to reward the communicative capacity to trigger complex activations. This is where the bottleneck posed by the linearity of auditory triggers becomes all important: the adumbration of iterations is pretty much all we have, trigger-wise. Complex activation famously requires some kind of molecular cognitive sensitivity to vocalizations, the capacity to construct novel, covariational complexities on the slim basis of adumbrated iterations. Linguistic cognition, in other words, needs to be a ‘combinatorial mechanism,’ a device (or series of devices) able to derive complex activations given only a succession of iterations.



message 39: by Alan (new)

Alan | 534 comments Richard wrote: "Yiddish is the language of Jews. It is centuries old and words like kibitzing (which means "offering unwelcome advice") have specific meanings for those who speak Yiddish. When others come along an..."
I'm Jewish; my parents speak Yiddish and if someone butted in to give advice to my opponent in a game, I would definitely yell "stop kibitzing" but I don't mind if someone refers to a casual conversation with a friend as "just kibitzing around." Yiddish is just a mix of Hebrew and Low German and if it couldn't mutate a bit, it really would be a dead language (rather than just nearly dead).

As for hated words, I hate "explode" as in "the flavor exploded in my mouth" in food reviews. Blech
Words I love -- every word I had to look up while reading Gene Wolfe's books.


message 40: by Ken (new)

Ken (kanthr) | 334 comments Alan, Gene Wolfe yes! The man is a great resource for excellent words.


message 41: by Gary (new)

Gary I hate:

Weapondry
Supposubly
Dude (when directed at a woman/girl.)
Americans who pronounce "schedule" as "shejul" instead of "skedjool." For Brits, fine. Americans should get over themselves.

Words I like:

sussuration
zarf (both fun to say and funny that there's a word for that.)
cremains
omniverse

Words that kind of wig me out:

demonstration (has "demon" in it, and I can't not see it....)
conscience (the contrary of science?)

Words that I know freak people out, but shouldn't:

niggardly
gun control
liberal


message 42: by Joaquin (new)

Joaquin Garza | 37 comments I've come to hate the use and abuse of the word 'doublet'.

If it's 'velvet doublet', worse still


message 43: by Ken (new)

Ken (kanthr) | 334 comments I'm sick of 'resplendent' too.


message 44: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Griffin | 49 comments Eric wrote: "Stephanie wrote: "Eric wrote: "I think I'd ban awesome, at least until it got its original meaning back.

Eric - you are my soulmate! I refuse to utter that word! It is so overused. Not everything..."


Ha! I saw that too. :)


message 45: by Tassie Dave, S&L Historian (new)

Tassie Dave | 3495 comments Mod
Gary wrote: "Words that I know freak people out, but shouldn't:

niggardly
gun control
liberal "


I would add:
socialist and atheist.


message 46: by Ken (new)

Ken (kanthr) | 334 comments Just to be fair let's add conservative too.

A lot of words have gotten bad connotations.

I'm sick of hearing "sustainable".


message 47: by [deleted user] (new)

there arent any words I really hate, but I love the words "bizarre", "bazaar" and "nifty".


message 48: by Janessa (new)

Janessa (labyrinth001) Richard wrote: "Janessa wrote: "I think I am in love with the word defenestrate now...

Also, I am aware of the definition to which you are very kindly referring. But kibitzing has multiple definitions in this day..."


Dear lord, if I'm being criticized for "bastardizing" a single word, then we're all screwed. How many words do we use everyday that used to mean something else? How many words do we use that used to have one meaning, that now have three or four? Heck, at least the definition I gave is related to the original meaning of kibitzing. What about words that have completely morphed meanings? Etymology is the study of words and their development...how they have CHANGED. You can't look at a word's history, see that it originated as something else, and decide that is the only way it can be used.

Language isn't static. It changes. We can't live in a world where different cultures constantly collide and expect everything to stay the same. If it did, then we wouldn't have dead languages. The history of a word is a beautiful thing; I never said the original definition is "useless" or that it's not a vital part of the word. But I think it's in poor taste to see a person using a second, newer meaning (a person of my "ilk"), and say they are desecrating a whole language.

Man, I feel like I came on here and said that kibitzing means having sex in a field of cabbage...Then maybe I'd see why you seem to feel personally offended. I would be interested in hearing how you decide whether or not a word is permitted to be changed...or if you think words should change at all.


message 49: by Janessa (new)

Janessa (labyrinth001) Sebastian wrote: "there arent any words I really hate, but I love the words "bizarre", "bazaar" and "nifty"."

I also like the word bizarre...it sounds like its definition.


message 50: by Janessa (new)

Janessa (labyrinth001) Isaiah wrote: "I think I would second banning amazing. It is overused (by myself sometimes) and there are many other words that convey the same thing. A word I like and never hear is mondegreen, a misinterpretati..."

I also tend to overuse amazing, despite the fact that I hate it. It's just so easy to use.


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