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III. Goodreads Readers > Has anyone as indie publisher, received a call from the publisher who rejected it before?

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message 1: by Stjepan (last edited Mar 06, 2016 10:05AM) (new)

Stjepan Cobets | 53 comments Honestly all the publishers that I sent the book refused my novel. For this reason I have published a book on Amazon. My book is maybe good, maybe not, it shall decide only readers. The question is hypothetical because I doubt that this can happen: How to react if someone from the publisher decides to contact me? Do I stay indie or not?
I would have to think hard about what I get and what I lose.
I wrote this purely out of my curiosity to talk about this topic.

Stjepan


message 2: by Mellie (last edited Mar 06, 2016 10:18AM) (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 542 comments The odds of it happening are slim - unless your book has rocketed to the top of the charts at Amazon and is dominating the USA Today/NYT bestseller lists.

Don't worry about it. Write the next book. Review the contract IF it ever happens, but first you book needs to be such a hot property that agents and publishers can't ignore it.


message 3: by Stjepan (new)

Stjepan Cobets | 53 comments A.W. wrote: "The odds of it happening are slim - unless your book has rocketed to the top of the charts at Amazon and is dominating the USA Today/NYT bestseller lists.

Don't worry about it. Write the next boo..."


I'm not worried at all, I ask out of curiosity. That will be the best-selling books for me is science fiction. :)


message 4: by Doug (new)

Doug Oudin | 168 comments I actually did receive a phone call from a small publishing company after publishing my second book. Since I had signed a two-book agreement with a vanity press publisher, I was committed to staying with that entity. The caller left me with contact information in the event that I wanted to use them with any subsequent books. If and when I do publish again, I would submit to traditional publishers, and with relatively good success from my first two books, plus the fact that I have now established at least a small platform to stand upon, I would think my chances of getting accepted have improved.


message 5: by Steve (new)

Steve Kemp | 4 comments I was accepted by a publisher only to turned out after the editing process had begun. Along the same lines of what Doug said, just the fact I'd been accepted by a publisher multiplied the number of people who looked at me the second time around.


message 6: by Stjepan (new)

Stjepan Cobets | 53 comments Doug wrote: "I actually did receive a phone call from a small publishing company after publishing my second book. Since I had signed a two-book agreement with a vanity press publisher, I was committed to stayin..."

It would be nice if someone noticed the book and offer a good chance. The dream of every writer to publish his book. But without the internet most of us would keep its books in the drawers where they gathered dust.


message 7: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Luckourt (nicole_luckourt) | 5 comments I read several indie authors (all within the romance genre) who have been approached by publishers after the sales of their books reached a certain level. These authors are definitely the exception more than the norm, but I think it demonstrates that an exceptional sales history does (on occasion) garner attention from those in the industry.


message 8: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 2189 comments If a publisher rejects your book but then sees its doing good and contacts you then consider writing another novel with them. Your published book is fine as is so if they still want your work they can always get some new work from you.


message 9: by Stjepan (new)

Stjepan Cobets | 53 comments Nicole wrote: "I read several indie authors (all within the romance genre) who have been approached by publishers after the sales of their books reached a certain level. These authors are definitely the exception..."

This surely means that books are good.


message 10: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Luckourt (nicole_luckourt) | 5 comments With the exception of one, the authors also had other books out as well. Bella Forrest has now sold over 3 million copies and, from what I can tell, has remained an indie author. I think this speaks to the different paths authors take, because I'm sure she's been approached by an agent/publisher with a sales record like that. And I've read several of her earliest books and thought they were good :)


message 11: by Zee (last edited Mar 06, 2016 09:24PM) (new)

Zee Monodee (zee_monodee) | 154 comments You have to decide whether staying indie is a better bet for you. For example, for me, I definitely make more as an indie than when I was with a publisher (makes sense when you think Amazon allows for 70% in some cases, while with publishers, it's along the range of 35-45% in most cases, so that's almost double the royalties). I also get to write my books as I want them to come out - I have a series of 12 books I started for a publisher, and Book 1 came out and I was told to bring Book2 in, but the ownership changed hands in between and the new owners didn't want to continue the series. I had already started it, with outlines all done for the whole thing, so I started going indie with it and there's no question whether the book will be rejected upon submission or not. I also get to decide my release schedule (like, I have a trilogy I released over 3 consecutive months, and it is my best-seller at the moment, but when Books1&2 were released by a publisher, there was more than a year of wait between books, and I lost readers as a consequence).
So decide if being with a publisher makes more sense for you. I am lucky that I am also a cover artist so I can make my own covers, and I'm also an editor, as is my best friend and business partner, and we edit for each other so this brings down our indie costs. If costs is a consideration, then a publisher would take those on for a greater cut of your royalties, but if you can afford to go at it yourself, then think carefully what 'better' good the publisher could bring you.


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